PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Phytophthora “the plant destroyer” meets its match with a new identification tool

Phytophthora “the plant destroyer” meets its match with a new identification tool
2023-05-24
(Press-News.org) Known as the “plant destroyer,” the genus Phytophthora is considered one of the most important groups of plant pathogens—causing significant economic and environmental losses throughout history and into today. There are over 200 identified species in the Phytophthora genus. These pathogens, and those yet to be identified, can spread quickly due to the increasing rate of global trade, e-commerce, and travel. Rapid identification is therefore critical for effective plant disease management.

While several international online resources for Phytophthora identification currently exist, in some instances they contain incorrect sequences submitted to the National Center of Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which is open to the public with no vetting process. These incorrect NCBI sequences have been filtered into the Phytophthora online resources, perpetuated, and multiplied over the years. Dr. Z. Gloria Abad and other members of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s (APHIS) Plant Pathogen Confirmatory Diagnostics Laboratory and Pest Identification Technology Laboratory have collaborated with relevant experts for nearly a decade to develop an alternate, robust identification tool that avoids the pitfalls of its counterparts. Abad and colleagues shared this innovative online tool, called “IDphy,” in the journal Plant Disease for the correct and timely identification of Phytophthora species.

IDphy is the first online tool for molecular and morphological identification that uses the data of the ex-type cultures, which are the duplicates of the original type specimen (mostly a single dry culture deposited in a single herbarium collection) for identifying plant pathogens. This increases its reliability and accuracy compared to other resources that rely on photographs, sequences, or descriptions alone. The online tool covers all described species with primary focus on those that cause diseases of economic and environmental impact. Additionally, IDphy includes an interactive Lucid key and a tabular key; factsheets with information on structural and molecular features of each species; information on new species and hybrid descriptions, as well as the status of specimens and availability of whole genome sequences of the ex-types; a mobile app (free for Android and iOS); and a computer-based model and phylogenetic sequence analysis with seven genes.

These features, which will be regularly updated, make IDphy a comprehensive, “one-stop shop” for the accurate identification of Phytophthora species. “The ability to accurately identify plant pathogens is critical for research on the biology and ecology of these organisms aimed at developing strategies for managing plant diseases,” Abad explains. “By providing access to a large database of information on Phytophthora species, including molecular and morphological features, IDphy can help researchers quickly and accurately identify the species they are working with. This, in turn, can help accelerate research by reducing the time and effort needed for accurate identification.” The tool will also be a huge asset to diagnostic labs identifying Phytophthora species of regulatory concern, which is an essential first step to reducing their impact on agriculture and the environment, says Abad.

The development of IDphy can significantly impact the diagnostics and management of plant diseases in agriculture and natural ecosystems, hopefully inspiring researchers worldwide to develop similar resources for other plant pathogens.

 

For more information on this free ID tool, read IDphy: An International Online Resource for Molecular and Morphological Identification of Phytophthora, published in Vol. 107, No. 4 / April 2023 of Plant Disease.

 

Learn more about this work on social media

USDA APHIS Twitter and LinkedIn: @USDA_APHIS and USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

USDA APHIS Facebook: USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University Twitter: @NCSU_DEPP

Phytophthora Science and Management Facebook: The Centre for Phytophthora Science and Management

 

Follow us on Twitter @PlantDiseaseJ and visit https://apsjournals.apsnet.org/journal/pdis to learn more.

END

[Attachments] See images for this press release:
Phytophthora “the plant destroyer” meets its match with a new identification tool

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Engineers at UMass Amherst harvest abundant clean energy from thin air, 24/7

Engineers at UMass Amherst harvest abundant clean energy from thin air, 24/7
2023-05-24
Researchers describe the “generic Air-gen effect”—nearly any material can be engineered with nanopores to harvest, cost effective, scalable, interruption-free electricity AMHERST, Mass. – A team of engineers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has recently shown that nearly any material can be turned into a device that continuously harvests electricity from humidity in the air. The secret lies in being able to pepper the material with nanopores less than 100 nanometers in diameter. The research appeared in the journal Advanced Materials. “This is very exciting,” ...

Multifunctional interface enables manipulation of light waves in free space

Multifunctional interface enables manipulation of light waves in free space
2023-05-24
Recent technological advances have given us a remarkable ability to manipulate and control light waves, opening up numerous applications in various fields, such as optical communication, sensing, imaging, energy, and quantum computing. At the heart of this progress are photonic structures that can control light waves, either at the chip level in the form of photonic integrated circuits (PICs) or in free space as meta-optics. Combining these structures allows for the creation of compact optical systems. The PICs can be used to make subtle changes to the light wave, ...

Harvard professor and entrepreneur Tim Springer donates $210 million to the Institute for Protein Innovation

Harvard professor and entrepreneur Tim Springer donates $210 million to the Institute for Protein Innovation
2023-05-24
BOSTON, March 29, 2023 — The Institute for Protein Innovation (IPI), a nonprofit research organization, announced today a $210 million gift from Tim Springer, Ph.D., veteran entrepreneur and professor at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital, who founded IPI in 2017 with Andrew Kruse, Ph.D. The gift will advance protein science and accelerate research to improve human health.  The philanthropic gift—made by Springer, his wife Chafen Lu, Ph.D., and their children—adds ...

New research prizes will give $2.5 million to top scientists in Texas

New research prizes will give $2.5 million to top scientists in Texas
2023-05-24
DALLAS – Texas scientists will receive $2.5 million in funding to advance their research thanks to a new prize program from Lyda Hill Philanthropies and TAMEST (Texas Academy of Medicine, Engineering, Science and Technology). The Hill Prizes, funded by Lyda Hill Philanthropies, will accelerate high-risk, high-reward research ideas with significant potential for real-world impact. The Prizes will celebrate top Texas innovators and researchers whose work could significantly impact science and society in five categories: Medicine, Engineering, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences ...

Morressier joins the fight for science with federated integrity suite for authors and publishers

2023-05-24
Berlin and Washington DC, May 24, 2023 – Morressier announced today an integrity suite that will be offered as part of its end-to-end platform, designed to increase the quality of and trust in the outputs of scientific research. Pre-flight checks for authors will flag potential quality issues, check for completeness of submissions, and provide recommendations for improvements in areas such as language. Publishers using the Morressier platform now have access to a powerful suite of automated tools to help them identify integrity issues early and at scale. Plagiarism detection tools in the Morressier platform, for instance, indicate phrases in submissions that may ...

SEngine Precision Medicine demonstrates potential of PARIS® Test to find unexpected therapeutic options for treating cancer

2023-05-24
SEngine Precision Medicine, the precision oncology innovator matching patients to medicines based on their own tumor samples, announces the publication of a new case report showing a patient’s remarkable response to an off-label therapy identified by its PARIS® Test. Despite standard-of-care chemotherapy and two surgeries, the patient’s low-grade serous ovarian cancer (LGSOC) was progressing and her prognosis was terminal. But by testing a range of therapies in organoids grown from the patient’s own tumor sample, SEngine’s PARIS® Test identified as ...

Logging on for health: More older adults use patient portals, but access and attitudes vary widely

2023-05-24
Far more older adults these days log on to secure websites or apps to connect with their health information or have a virtual health care appointment, compared with five years ago, a new poll shows. Overall, 78% of people aged 50 to 80 have used at least one patient portal, up from 51% in a poll taken five years ago, according to findings from the University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging. Of those with portal access, 55% had used it in the past month, and 49% have accounts on more than one portal. But the poll also reveals major disparities, with some groups of older adults less likely to use patient portals, or more likely ...

Life stressors may contribute to multiple sclerosis flares, disability

2023-05-24
A Michigan Medicine-led study finds that stressors across the lifespan — including poverty, abuse and divorce — are associated with worsening health and functional outcomes for people with multiple sclerosis. Using survey data from more than 700 people with MS, researchers discovered that stressful events occurring both in childhood and adulthood contributed significantly to participants’ level of disability. The results are published in Brain and Behavior. “MS is the leading cause of non-traumatic ...

Existing drugs point to first treatment for strokes linked to dementia

2023-05-24
People who experience a type of stroke linked with nearly half of all dementias could be treated for the first time by repurposing two cheap and common drugs, a trial shows.   Researchers found that isosorbide mononitrate and cilostazol, which are already used to treat other heart and circulatory diseases, can safely improve the debilitating outcomes people experience after lacunar stroke.   The two drugs, which were found to be even more effective when used in combination, could be available as a treatment for lacunar strokes within five years, if the results are ...

Long or short menstrual cycles linked to higher risk of CVD including atrial fibrillation

2023-05-24
Research Highlights: An analysis of data for more than 58,000 women in the U.K. Biobank found that both short (less than 21 days) or long (more than 35 days) menstrual cycles were associated with the development of cardiovascular disease, heart attack or atrial fibrillation (AFib). Short or long menstrual cycle length was associated with a 19% higher risk of heart disease among those women compared to women with menstrual cycle length between 22 to 34 days. Irregular menstrual cycle length was associated with a 40% higher risk of atrial ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Many older adults receiving home care do not receive palliative care before death

Reforestation schemes are not enough to recover the carbon created by harvesting wood, research suggests

Antidepressant dispensing to adolescents and young adults surges during pandemic

Healthcare leaders plea to reinstate the Canadian hypertension control program to prevent death and disability

Drug limits dangerous reactions to allergy-triggering foods, Stanford Medicine-led study of kids finds

Measuring the properties of light: Scientists realise new method for determining quantum states

For faster access to gene and cell therapies in Europe

Scientists deliver portable total chemical analysis without pumps and tubes

A very long, winding road: Developing novel therapeutics for metastatic tumors

Unlocking health: How In Our DNA SC is pioneering genetic screening for South Carolinians

Down Under Demo: ONR touts additive manufacturing tech at Australian event

Study shows benralizumab is effective as a treatment for eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, a rare form of vasculitis

Researchers identify new choice of therapy for rare autoimmune disease EGPA

Powering nitrogenases

NJIT marketing experts measure brain waves and skin current to predict emotions

Babies use immune system differently, but efficiently

Cloud clustering causes more extreme rain

Mindfulness at work protects against stress and burnout

Scientists closer to solving mysteries of universe after measuring gravity in quantum world

Revolutionary brain stimulation technique shows promise for treating brain disorders

Global warming increases the diversity of active soil bacteria

Patient mindset training helps care teams

Dual-energy harvesting device could power future wireless medical implants

Study: ‘Hexaplex’ vaccine aims to boost flu protection

New structural insights could lead to mechanical enhancement in alloys

New research challenges conventional picture of Parkinson's disease

Dairy cows fed botanicals-supplemented diets use energy more efficiently

Aston University receives nearly half a million pounds to create safer and greener batteries

New study shows glycan sugar coating of IgG immunoglobulin can predict cardiovascular health

Sir Peter Rigby appointed as honorary chair of Aston University’s new Digital Futures Institute

[Press-News.org] Phytophthora “the plant destroyer” meets its match with a new identification tool