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World leader in photonics gives talk at Aston University

World leader in photonics gives talk at Aston University
2023-05-26
(Press-News.org) Talk by one of the leading lights in optical communications Dr. Ming-Jun Li is currently a corporate fellow at Corning Incorporated He discussed installed optical fibres for ultra-wideband transmission systems.  

26 May 2023 | Birmingham, UK

Aston University has hosted one of the leading lights in optical communications and speciality optical fibres at its second international photonics workshop.

 

Dr. Ming-Jun Li is currently a corporate fellow at Corning Incorporated in the USA and headed up the event by giving the opening keynote presentation.

 

The workshop was designed to address some of the key challenges in optical communication specifically ultra-wide band optical transmission systems. It was held on 18 and 19 May to fall on the same week as the International Light Day, which celebrates the impact photonics has had on the world.

 

Dr Li holds over 260 U.S. patents, has published seven book chapters and has authored over 350 technical papers. This year he received the 2023 John Tyndall Award and last year was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame. He is also a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of Optica and IEEE.

 

In his presentation he reviewed the designs and physical characteristics of installed optical fibres for ultra-wideband transmission systems and explored future directions for development of optical fibres beyond current limits of physical performance.
 

As well as Dr Li, the workshop attracted speakers from Nokia Bell Labs USA, British Telecom, Deutsche Telecom, Infinera Germany, KDDI Japan, NICT Japan, and multiple leading UK and EU universities.

 

The two-day event was organised by researchers Dr Alex Donodin and Dr Pratim Hazarika of Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies (AiPT) part of the College of Physical Sciences and Engineering. The Institute is one of the world’s leading photonics research centres. Professor Wladek Forysiak, deputy director of AIPT, who chaired the plenary session said: “It was a pleasure to host Dr Li and the other speakers.

“Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies is home to a range of photonics experts from world-leading academics to early career researchers.

“Events such as this help to strengthen our reputation and our links with our key stakeholders, research partners and global industry.”

AIPT coordinates more than 60 national and international, research and industrial projects and offers postgraduate courses.

 

ENDS

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[Press-News.org] World leader in photonics gives talk at Aston University