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Aspergillus fumigatus is a saprotrophic fungus that can cause serious life-threatening invasive infections in immunocompromised individuals

By constructing a recombination map, this study shows that A. fumigatus produces the highest number of crossovers

Aspergillus fumigatus is a saprotrophic fungus that can cause serious life-threatening invasive infections in immunocompromised individuals
2023-09-14
(Press-News.org)

Aspergillus fumigatus is a saprotrophic fungus that can cause serious life-threatening invasive infections in immunocompromised individuals; by constructing a recombination map, this study shows that A. fumigatus produces the highest number of crossovers per chromosome ever described (~30 per chromosome pair).

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In your coverage, please use this URL to provide access to the freely available paper in PLOS Biology:   http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.3002278

Article Title: The human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus can produce the highest known number of meiotic crossovers

Author Countries: the Netherlands, United Kingdom

Funding: This work was supported by the Nederlands Wetenschappelijk Organisatie (ALWGR.2017.010 to BA), The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases 2018 Research Grant (3184200058 to ES), and the Wellcome Trust (219551/Z/19/Z to JR, FAS, PSD, MCF). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. The other authors received no specific funding for this work. MCF is a CIFAR Fellow in the Fungal Kingdom programme.

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[Press-News.org] Aspergillus fumigatus is a saprotrophic fungus that can cause serious life-threatening invasive infections in immunocompromised individuals
By constructing a recombination map, this study shows that A. fumigatus produces the highest number of crossovers