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Social determinants of health and perceived barriers to care in diabetic retinopathy screening

JAMA Ophthalmology

2023-11-16
(Press-News.org) About The Study: This study of 11,000 participants with type 2 diabetes found that food insecurity, housing insecurity, mental health concerns, and the perceived importance of practitioner concordance were associated with a lower likelihood of receiving eye care. Such findings highlight the self-reported barriers to seeking care and the importance of taking steps to promote health equity.

Authors: Sophia Y. Wang, M.D., M.S., of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/ 

(doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2023.5287)

Editor’s Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

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Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2023.5287?guestAccessKey=1a6ec4f0-e9b3-4729-9957-4b638065fec8&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=111623

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[Press-News.org] Social determinants of health and perceived barriers to care in diabetic retinopathy screening
JAMA Ophthalmology