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App-based interventions for moderate to severe depression

JAMA Network Open

2023-11-20
(Press-News.org) About The Study: In this systematic review and meta-analysis of 13 randomized clinical trials of app interventions with 1,470 participants, the feasibility and efficacy of mobile app interventions were supported in treating moderate and severe depression, and practical implications were also provided for developing effective app-based interventions in clinical practice. 

Authors: Ji-Won Hur, Ph.D., of Korea University in Seoul, Republic of Korea, is the corresponding author. 

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/ 

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.44120)

Editor’s Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

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Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.44120?utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_term=1120          23

About JAMA Network Open: JAMA Network Open is an online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. On weekdays, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication. 

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[Press-News.org] App-based interventions for moderate to severe depression
JAMA Network Open