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Bentham Science announces release of "Amazon Web Services: The Definitive Guide for Beginners and Advanced Users"

2023-11-20
(Press-News.org)

In a world driven by digital transformation, Amazon Web Services (AWS) has emerged as a powerhouse, providing on-demand cloud computing platforms and APIs to individuals, companies, and governments. Bentham Science is delighted to unveil "Amazon Web Services: The Definitive Guide for Beginners and Advanced Users," a comprehensive text that simplifies the complexities of AWS, making it accessible to graduate students, professionals, and academic researchers in computer science, engineering, and information technology.

Key Features: 

Hands-On Approach for Beginners:  The book adopts a practical, hands-on approach, ensuring that beginners can dive into AWS with confidence. It covers fundamental topics such as Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, Elastic Load Balancing, Auto Scaling Groups, and Amazon Simple Storage Service, providing a solid foundation for users. Identity and Access Management (IAM) and Attribute-Based Access Control:  Understanding IAM is crucial in the AWS landscape. The guide delves into AWS's identity and access management resources, emphasizing attribute-based access control to empower users with the knowledge to manage permissions effectively. Comprehensive Coverage of AWS Services:   From serverless computing services and Virtual Private Cloud to Amazon Aurora, Amazon Comprehend, and more, the book offers a thorough exploration of AWS's extensive service offerings. It provides readers with insights into the capabilities and applications of these services. AWS Free Tier, Marketplace, and EC2:  Beginners often seek cost-effective ways to explore AWS. The text addresses this by explaining AWS Free Tier, the Marketplace for third-party applications, and the EC2 Service, allowing users to make informed decisions about their AWS journey. Security and High-Performance Computing:  Security is a top priority in any cloud environment. The book elucidates security measures in AWS, introducing readers to the shared responsibility model. Additionally, it explores high-performance computing on AWS, catering to users with advanced computing needs.  

How to Get the Book: 

"Amazon Web Services: The Definitive Guide for Beginners and Advanced Users" is available through Bentham Science. https://benthambooks.com/book/9789815165821/contributors/

 

 

  About the Authors: 

1.   Parul Dubey: 

Parul Dubey is an AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner and an author of books and tutorials on Amazon Web Services. As an Assistant Professor, at the Department of AI, G H Raisoni College of Engineering, Nagpur, Dubey has 15 Indian patents and 10 scholarly publications to her credit.

 

2.   Arvind Kumar Tiwari

Arvind Kumar Tiwari teaches computer science at the Department of CS & IT, Dr. C V Raman University, Bilaspur.

 

3.   Rohit Raja: 

Rohit Raja is an Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Information Technology, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur, India. Raja is an active academic, having published 100 research papers in international and national journals.

END



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[Press-News.org] Bentham Science announces release of "Amazon Web Services: The Definitive Guide for Beginners and Advanced Users"