PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Novel research unveils methodological approach to study why some individuals are prone to weight gain, while others are protected from weight gain

2023-11-21
(Press-News.org) ROCKVILLE, Md.—Even though it’s known that people who have a higher genetic risk for obesity generally have a higher body mass index (BMI), researchers have unveiled a new methodological approach to find out why some individuals are more susceptible to weight gain than others for reasons not related to their genetic liability to obesity, according to a study published in Obesity, The Obesity Society’s (TOS) flagship journal. The study is the first of its kind to determine in a pair of twins with large intrapair BMI differences whom of the co-twins had acquired a BMI that deviated from their genetically-informed BMI.

“This novel approach opens doors to uncover the protective and detrimental factors that precede weight gain, offering valuable insights into how people can maintain a healthy weight,” said Bram J. Berntzen, PhD, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, University of Helsinki, Finland. Berntzen is the corresponding and first author of the study.

In previous research, scientists have studied adult monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs with large within-twin-pair differences in BMI. However, these studies were cross-sectional and did not consider the genetic pre-disposition to obesity. Earlier studies on twin pairs with large intrapair BMI differences have also not established whether the co-twin with higher or lower BMI is the one who deviates more from genetic pre-disposition. In the current research, the study’s authors investigated 36-year BMI trajectories in twins whose BMI in young adulthood was below, within or above their genetically-predicted BMI. Below prediction means resilience against weight gain while above indicates susceptibility to weight gain prior to study inclusion.

Researchers selected the twin pairs from the Older Finnish Twin Co-hort, a group consisting of twins born before 1958 and alive in 1974 in Finland. Surveys conducted in 1975 and 1981 targeted all twins in the co-hort, whereas a 1990 survey was restricted to twins born between 1930 and 1957.

Genotype data were collected mainly from the late 1990’s onwards. Based on twins participating in 1975, 3,227 complete same-sex twin pairs (34% monozygotic) around their 30’s had genotype data. The 2011 data collection targeted twins born between 1945 and 1957 with 943 of them (44% monozygotic) having genotype data.

Zygosity or twin characteristics were confirmed through genotyping information derived from blood samples. Personal characteristics were self-reported through a questionnaire. BMI was also self-reported through weight and height measurements. BMI was categorized as underweight, normal weight, overweight and obesity. The polygenic risk score for BMI was based on 996,919 common single nucleotide polymorphisms.

In monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs with large intrapair BMI differences, two-thirds of co-twins with a higher observed BMI in 1975 deviated above predicted BMI compared to one-third of co-twins with a lower BMI who deviated below prediction. Each deviating individual had a twin sibling who followed their genetic pre-disposition to obesity. Individuals below, within and above prediction in 1975 reached, respectively, normal weight, overweight and obesity by 2011, with a mean BMI increase of 4.5.

Additionally, Berntzen noted the BMI of twins when they were a young adult played an important role in whether they reached a healthy body weight after 36 years since everyone generally gained weight with aging. Berntzen added “for this reason, it’s vital to study the reasons for weight gain already during childhood before they become young adults.” Future studies may examine characteristics of children over time, calculating their genetically-informed BMI as they reach young adulthood to understand the factors affecting their weight gain trajectories, he said.

The study’s authors noted that the determinants and health implications of regular BMI trajectories instead of PRS-enriched BMI trajectories require further research.

Other authors of the study include Teemu Palviainen and Jaakko Kaprio, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, University of Helsinki, Finland; Karri Silventoinen, Faculty of Social Sciences, Population Research Unit, University of Helsinki; and Kirsi H. Pietiläinen, Obesity Research Unit, Research Program for Clinical and Molecular Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki and HealthyWeightHub, Endocrinology, Abdominal Center, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki. 

The authors declared no conflict of interest.

The study, titled “Polygenic Risk of Obesity and BMI Trajectories over 36 Years: A Longitudinal Study of Adult Finnish Twins,” will be published in the print issue of Obesity in December 2023.

#  #  #

The Obesity Society (TOS) is the leading organization of scientists and health professionals devoted to understanding and reversing the epidemic of obesity and its adverse health, economic and societal effects. Combining the perspective of researchers, clinicians, policymakers and patients, TOS promotes innovative research, education and evidence-based clinical care to improve the health and well-being of all people with obesity. For more information, visit www.obesity.org.

END



ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Trial to prevent sudden death after a heart attack enrols first patient

2023-11-21
Sophia Antipolis – 21 November 2023:  The first clinical trial to challenge the routine implantation of a defibrillator in myocardial infarction survivors with heart failure has enrolled its first patient. The PROFID EHRA trial is part of the EU-funded PROFID project, which aims to personalise the prevention of sudden cardiac death after myocardial infarction and involves a consortium of 21 multidisciplinary partners including the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Sudden cardiac death is a major public health problem ...

High temperatures may have caused over 70,000 excess deaths in Europe in 2022

2023-11-21
The burden of heat-related mortality during the summer of 2022 in Europe may have exceeded 70,000 deaths according to a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a research centre supported by the “la Caixa” Foundation. The authors of the study, published in The Lancet Regional Health – Europe, revised upwards initial estimates of the mortality associated with record temperatures in 2022 on the European continent. In an earlier study, published in Nature Medicine, the same team used epidemiological models applied to weekly temperature and mortality data in 823 regions in 35 European countries and estimated the number ...

Toward sustainable energy applications with breakthrough in proton conductors

Toward sustainable energy applications with breakthrough in proton conductors
2023-11-21
Donor doping into a mother material with disordered intrinsic oxygen vacancies, instead of the widely used strategy of acceptor doping into a material without oxygen vacancies, can greatly enhance the conductivity and stability of perovskite-type proton conductors at intermediate and low temperatures of 250–400 °C, as demonstrated by Tokyo Tech scientists (e.g. 10 mS/cm at 320 °C). This innovative approach provides a new design direction for proton conductors for fuel cells and electrolysis cells. Many countries in the world are pushing for the development ...

Apology psychology: Breaking gender stereotypes leads to more effective communication

2023-11-21
Saying "I'm sorry," especially in the workplace, can be tricky terrain. Delivering an effective apology can help resolve conflicts, restore trust and promote collaboration among coworkers. But what works best? A research team including a University of Arizona faculty member says that to make your next apology more effective, use language that goes against gender stereotypes. Sarah Doyle, associate professor in the Department of Management and Organizations in the Eller College of Management, said the team wanted to ...

Poor nutrition contributes to poor mental health and risk of diabetes

2023-11-21
People with diabetes (Diabetes Mellitus) are two-to-three times more likely to have depression than people without, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Current treatment includes therapy, medicine, or both. However, the understanding of the multifaceted relationship between nutrition, mental health, and DM is relatively new in scientific discourse. Mason researchers sought to learn about the connection between nutrition, diabetes, and mental health.  Two literature reviews from assistant ...

Ochsner participates in study showing aspirin may not be necessary with LVAD

Ochsner participates in study showing aspirin may not be necessary with LVAD
2023-11-21
A groundbreaking study recently published in JAMA indicates that aspirin may not be necessary as part of an antithrombotic regimen for patients with a fully magnetically levitated left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Ochsner Health surgical director for the Mechanical Assist Device Circulatory Support Program, Dr. Aditya Bansal, was a contributing author on the study known as the ARIES-HM3 trial. The ARIES-HM3 trial, a randomized trial involving 628 patients with advanced heart failure, compared the outcomes of patients who received aspirin (100 mg/d) with those who received a placebo in addition to a vitamin K antagonist ...

Caring is sharing: Call for more openness on cancer drug trial results

2023-11-21
Development of potential or improved anti-cancer treatments are being blocked or slowed down by lack of transparency in data sharing between pharmaceutical companies and research groups, according to cancer clinicians, researchers and consumers.   The multidisciplinary team led by Flinders University researchers Mr Natansh Modi and Dr Ashley Hopkins evaluates the literature and policy developments since the 2013 data sharing commitments were struck by US and European regulators, including the commitment to publish clinical trial results.   The agreement forged by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers ...

Calls for improved support about menstruation changes during perimenopause

2023-11-21
Perimenopausal women need better education and support about how their periods might change towards the end of their reproductive life, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The research, published in Post Reproductive Health, highlighted how as women approach the menopause, their periods may become unpredictable, heavy and cause worse premenstrual symptoms – including mood swings, breast tenderness and headaches. The team of researchers from the UCL EGA Institute of Women’s Health and Centre for Reproductive Health, University of Edinburgh, ...

Why emotions stirred by music create such powerful memories

2023-11-20
Key takeaways UCLA psychologists used music to manipulate emotions of volunteers and found the dynamics of their emotions molded otherwise neutral experiences into memorable events. The tug of war between integrating memories and separating them helps to form distinct memories, allowing people to understand and find meaning in their experiences, and retain information. These findings could hold therapeutic promise in helping people with PTSD and depression. Time flows in a continuous stream — yet our ...

Low-quality studies on early interventions for autism dominate the field, says researchers

Low-quality studies on early interventions for autism dominate the field, says researchers
2023-11-20
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that autism is becoming more common in young children. In an effort to improve the challenges young autistic children face as part of their early development, researchers have focused on developing and evaluating nonpharmaceutical interventions that can be provided in early childhood. Micheal Sandbank, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Health Sciences at the UNC School of Medicine, is an expert on the research supporting these early interventions, which informs clinical practice across the United States. A new comprehensive meta-analysis, led by Sandbank, shows that many low-quality ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

12.5, the 1st Impact Factor of COMMTR released!

Circadian clock impact on cluster headaches funded by $2.4M NIH grant for UTHealth Houston research

Study identifies first drug therapy for sleep apnea

How old is your bone marrow?

Boosting biodiversity without hurting local economies

ChatGPT is biased against resumes with credentials that imply a disability — but it can improve

Simple test for flu could improve diagnosis and surveillance

UT Health San Antonio researcher awarded five-year, $2.53 million NIH grant to study alcohol-assisted liver disease

Giving pre-med students hands-on clinical training

CAMH research suggests potential targets for prevention and early identification of psychotic disorders

Mapping the heart to prevent damage caused by a heart attack

Study challenges popular idea that Easter islanders committed ‘ecocide’

Chilling discovery: Study reveals evolution of human cold and menthol sensing protein, offering hope for future non-addictive pain therapies.

Elena Beccalli, new rector of Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, takes office on 1st July

Pacific Northwest Research Institute uncovers hidden DNA mechanisms of rare genetic diseases

Empowering older adults: Wearable tech made easier with personalized support

Pennington Biomedical researchers partner on award-winning Long Covid study

Cooling ‘blood oranges’ could make them even healthier – a bonus for consumers

Body image and overall health found important to the sexual health of older gay men, according to new studies

Lab-grown muscles reveal mysteries of rare muscle diseases

Primary hepatic angiosarcoma: Treatment options for a rare tumor

Research finds causal evidence tying cerebral small-vessel disease to Alzheimer’s, dementia

Navigating the Pyrocene: Recent Cell Press papers on managing fire risk

Restoring the Great Salt Lake would have environmental justice as well as ecological benefits

Cannabis, tobacco use, and COVID-19 outcomes

A 5:2 intermittent fasting meal replacement diet and glycemic control for adults with diabetes

Scientists document self-propelling oxygen decline in the oceans

Activating molecular target reverses multiple hallmarks of aging

Cannabis use tied to increased risk of severe COVID-19

How to make ageing a ‘fairer game’ for all wormkind

[Press-News.org] Novel research unveils methodological approach to study why some individuals are prone to weight gain, while others are protected from weight gain