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University of Houston and Scotland’s Heriot-Watt University forge strategic energy alliance

University of Houston and Scotland’s Heriot-Watt University forge strategic energy alliance
2024-04-12
(Press-News.org) HOUSTON, April 10, 2024 - The University of Houston (UH) and Scotland’s Heriot-Watt University (HWU) signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) today, marking the beginning of their partnership to foster global collaboration in education, research and innovation in the energy sector and beyond.

At the heart of the MoU lies a commitment to advance research that helps society deliver a just energy transition, with a particular emphasis on hydrogen – a critical element in the transition to sustainable energy solutions.

UH, a Carnegie-designated Tier One public research university, boasts several energy-focused research centers. Located in Houston, home to more than 4,500 energy companies and a pivotal international oil and gas hub, UH is uniquely positioned to build on the area’s existing expertise and demonstrate solutions at scale.

Founded in 1821, HWU is a research-led university with active programs in clean energy and next generation energy technologies. It is a global university with campuses in Scotland, the UAE and Malaysia.

By leveraging each other's strengths and resources, UH and HWU aim to create transformative opportunities for students, faculty researchers and industry partners on both sides of the Atlantic.

"I am thrilled to witness the official celebration of our shared commitment to advancing transformative energy solutions,” said Ramanan Krishnamoorti, vice president for energy and innovation at UH. “Through this partnership, we aim to harness our collective expertise to address pressing energy challenges and drive sustainable innovation on a global scale."

Professor Gillian Murray, deputy principal of business and enterprise at HWU, highlighted the significance of the partnership and its potential to propel scientific understanding.

“This agreement represents a pivotal milestone in the international development of our global research institutes, forging a new partnership to address the most pressing societal challenges that lie ahead,” Murray said.

The MOU was signed by UH President Renu Khator and Principal, Vice-Chancellor and Professor of HWU Richard A. Williams.

The signing was followed by a two-day technology workshop with sessions conducted by faculty members from both institutions exploring key areas of collaboration and future projects, including making, transporting and storing hydrogen and molecular modeling. The event also included tours of various UH research labs.

With a shared vision of addressing global challenges and driving innovation, UH and HWU are poised to collaborate on various initiatives spanning interdisciplinary research, student exchange programs, joint degree offerings and industry partnerships. By joining together, the universities seek to amplify their impact and make meaningful contributions for the greater good.

Both institutions are home to a diverse student body, reflecting their commitment to fostering inclusive learning environments that nurture talent from all backgrounds and prepare them to be the leaders of the future. Through this partnership, they aim to further enhance their international reach and provide students with greater opportunities for cross-cultural exchange and experiential learning.

*** To schedule an interview, please contact Rashda Khan: rkhan20@uh.edu or (c)325-656-2824. ***

About the University of Houston

The University of Houston is a Carnegie-designated Tier One public research university recognized with a Phi Beta Kappa chapter for excellence in undergraduate education. UH serves the globally competitive Houston and Gulf Coast Region by providing world-class faculty, experiential learning and strategic industry partnerships. Located in the nation's fourth-largest city and one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse regions in the country, UH is a federally designated Hispanic- and Asian-American-Serving institution with enrollment of more than 47,000 students.

About Heriot-Watt University

Heriot-Watt University (HWU) is a global research-led university based in the UK, with five campuses in Edinburgh, the Scottish Borders, Orkney, Dubai and Malaysia. Around 27,000 students from 154 countries are currently studying with us. We have 159,000 alumni in 190 countries. HWU was founded in Edinburgh in 1821 as the world’s first mechanics institute. In 1966, it became a university by Royal Charter. The university is named after 18th century Scottish engineer and inventor James Watt and 16th century Scottish philanthropist and goldsmith George Heriot. 

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University of Houston and Scotland’s Heriot-Watt University forge strategic energy alliance

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[Press-News.org] University of Houston and Scotland’s Heriot-Watt University forge strategic energy alliance