PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Study finds ChatGPT shows promise as medication management tool, could help improve geriatric health care

2024-04-18
(Press-News.org) Polypharmacy, or the concurrent use of five or more medications, is common in older adults and increases the risk of adverse drug interactions. While deprescribing unnecessary drugs can combat this risk, the decision-making process can be complex and time-consuming. Increasingly, there is a need for effective polypharmacy management tools that can support short-staffed primary care practitioners.

In a new study, researchers from the Mass General Brigham MESH Incubator found that ChatGPT, a generative artificial intelligence (AI) chatbot, showed promise as a tool to manage polypharmacy and deprescription. These findings, published April 18th in the Journal of Medical Systems, demonstrate the first use case of AI models in medicine management.

To evaluate its utility, the investigators provided ChatGPT with different clinical scenarios and asked it a set of decision-making questions. Each scenario featured the same elderly patient taking a mixture of medications but included variations in cardiovascular disease history (CVD) and degree of impairment in activities of daily living (ADL).

When asked yes or no questions about reducing prescribed drugs, ChatGPT consistently recommended deprescribing medications in patients without a history of CVD. However, it was more cautious when overlying CVD was introduced, and more likely to keep the patient’s medication regimen unchanged. In both cases, the researchers observed that ADL impairment severity did not seem to affect decision outcomes.

The team also noted that ChatGPT had a tendency to disregard pain and favored deprescribing pain medications over other drug types like statins or antihypertensives. In addition, ChatGPT responses varied when presented with the same scenario in new chat sessions — which the authors suggest could reflect inconsistency in commonly reported clinical deprescribing trends on which the model was trained.

More than 40 percent of older adults meet the criteria for polypharmacy. The rate of seniors on Medicare seeing more specialists on their care teams has increased in recent years, leaving primary care providers to oversee medication management. An effective AI tool could help aid this practice, according to the researchers. 

“Our study provides the first use case of ChatGPT as a clinical support tool for medication management,” said senior corresponding author Marc Succi, MD, Associate Chair of Innovation and Commercialization at Mass General Brigham Radiology and Executive Director of the MESH Incubator.  “While caution should be taken to increase accuracy of such models, AI-assisted polypharmacy management could help alleviate the increasing burden on general practitioners. Further research with specifically trained AI tools may significantly enhance the care of aging patients.”

Arya Rao, lead author, MESH researcher and Harvard Medical student, added “Our findings suggest that AI-based tools can play an important role in ensuring safe medication practices for older adults; it is imperative that we continue to refine these tools to account for the complexities of medical decision-making.”

in the Journal of Medical Systems.

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Heart failure, not stroke is the most common complication of atrial fibrillation

2024-04-18
The lifetime risk of atrial fibrillation (a heart condition that causes an irregular and often abnormally fast heart rate) has increased from one in four to one in three over the past two decades, finds a study from Denmark in The BMJ today. And among those with the condition, two in five are likely to develop heart failure over their remaining lifetime and one in five encounter a stroke, with little or no improvement in risk evident over the 20 year study period. As such, the researchers say stroke and heart failure prevention strategies are needed for people with atrial fibrillation. Atrial ...

Antipsychotics for dementia linked to more harms than previously acknowledged

2024-04-18
Antipsychotic use in people with dementia is associated with elevated risks of a wide range of serious adverse outcomes including stroke, blood clots, heart attack, heart failure, fracture, pneumonia, and acute kidney injury, compared with non-use, finds a study published by The BMJ today. These findings show a considerably wider range of harms associated with antipsychotic use in people with dementia than previously acknowledged in regulatory alerts, with risks highest soon after starting the drugs, ...

Health improvements occurred worldwide since 2010 despite COVID-19 pandemic, but progress was uneven

2024-04-18
Rates of early death and poor health caused by HIV/AIDS and diarrhea have been cut in half since 2010, and the rate of disease burden caused by injuries has dropped by a quarter in the same time period, after accounting for differences in age and population size across countries, based on a new study published in The Lancet. The study measures the burden of disease in years lost to early death and poor health. The findings indicate that total rates of global disease burden dropped by 14.2% between 2010 and 2019. However, the researchers found that the COVID-19 pandemic ...

Mind the gender gap – Met police least trusted by women

2024-04-18
Across England, confidence lowest among women and ethnic minorities Tory voters more trusting of police   Across all England’s regions, a study out in the journal Policing & Society spotlights London’s Metropolitan Police as the area where women trust the least.  Researchers surveyed more than 8,000 men and women between July 2022 and September 2023 and found women generally trust police more than men. But among the nine English regions surveyed, compared with men, women’s trust is at its lowest in London. It comes after a 2023 investigation triggered by outrage at the rape, abduction and murder of Sarah Everard by a serving officer, uncovered ...

Surrey engineers help Mauritius spot illegal fishing from space

2024-04-18
Authorities in Mauritius will begin combatting illegal fishing with satellite technology thanks to a partnership between the University of Surrey and the Mauritius Research and Innovation Council (MRIC).   The Nereus project combines satellite images with other ship location data. It uses artificial intelligence (AI) to detect anomalies, spotting ships of interest and working out where they are headed. Authorities can then check whether illegal fishing is taking place.   Dr Raffaella Guida, Reader in Satellite Remote Sensing at the Surrey Space Centre, at the University of Surrey, said: "Catching vessels illegally fishing off an island ...

Opioid dependence remains high but stable in Scotland, new surveillance report finds

2024-04-18
Opioid dependence in Scotland remains high but largely stable, according to a new University of Bristol-led analysis published in Addiction today [18 April] and by Public Health Scotland. The study is the first to estimate the number of people dependent on opioid drugs (such as heroin), and who are in or could benefit from drug treatment, among Scotland’s population since 2015/2016 estimates were published. Scotland has one of the highest rates of drug-related deaths in Europe, with the number of these more than doubling between 2011 and 2020. At 250-300 per million population in 2021-22, Scotland’s rate of drug-related deaths was ...

Protecting brain cells with cannabinol

Protecting brain cells with cannabinol
2024-04-18
LA JOLLA (April 17, 2024)—One in every 10 individuals above the age of 65 develops an age-related neurological disorder like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s, yet treatment options remain sparse for this population. Scientists have begun exploring whether cannabinoids—compounds derived from the cannabis plant, like well-known THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol)—may offer a solution. A third, lesser-known cannabinoid called CBN (cannabinol) has recently piqued the interest of researchers, who have begun exploring the clinical potential of the milder, less ...

Calorie restriction study reveals complexities in how diet impacts aging

2024-04-18
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Penn State researchers may have uncovered another layer of complexity in the mystery of how diet impacts aging. A new study led by researchers in the Penn State College of Health and Human Development examined how a person’s telomeres — sections of genetic bases that function like protective caps at the ends of chromosomes — were affected by caloric restriction. The team published their results in Aging Cell. Analyzing data from a two-year study of caloric restriction in humans, the researchers found that people who restricted their calories lost telomeres at different rates ...

Atom-by-atom: Imaging structural transformations in 2D materials

Atom-by-atom: Imaging structural transformations in 2D materials
2024-04-18
Silicon-based electronics are approaching their physical limitations and new materials are needed to keep up with current technological demands. Two-dimensional (2D) materials have a rich array of properties, including superconductivity and magnetism, and are promising candidates for use in electronic systems, such as transistors. However, precisely controlling the properties of these materials is extraordinarily difficult. In an effort to understand how and why 2D interfaces take on the structures they do, researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign have developed a method ...

How 3D printers can give robots a soft touch

How 3D printers can give robots a soft touch
2024-04-18
Soft skin coverings and touch sensors have emerged as a promising feature for robots that are both safer and more intuitive for human interaction, but they are expensive and difficult to make. A recent study demonstrates that soft skin pads doubling as sensors made from thermoplastic urethane can be efficiently manufactured using 3D printers. “Robotic hardware can involve large forces and torques, so it needs to be made quite safe if it’s going to either directly interact with humans or be used in human environments,” said project lead Joohyung Kim, a professor of electrical & computer engineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

A unified account of Darwinism’s varieties

Marketers can manage 'feature creep'

Intermittent fasting shows promise in improving gut health, weight management

Scientists identify gene that could lead to resilient ‘pixie’ corn

Utilizing medical assistants to manage patient portal messages shown to support practice and physician efficiency

Study shows clinic continuity associated with reduced hospital and emergency visits

Recognizing the range of experiences among individuals of Latino, Hispanic, and/or Spanish origin is an essential step toward health equity

study reveals decline in reported medicare outpatient procedures by family physicians amid an aging population

COVID-19 pandemic leads to drop in breast cancer screenings, especially among older and racial minority women

Translating the Surgeon General’s framework on social isolation and loneliness to actionable steps in primary care

Point/counterpoint: Is prediabetes overdiagnosed?

Primary care clinics can help low-income families receive nutritional support benefits

The wall of evidence for continuity of care

Parents of children with serious illness from Somali, Hmong, and Latin American communities desire better communication and support in pediatric health care

Primary care can improve hygienic practices while reducing waste

HKUST researchers enhance performance of eco-friendly cooling applications by developing sustainable strategy to manipulate interfacial heat transfer

Variations in medical assistant to primary care clinician staffing ratios may reflect differences in practice ownership and organizational culture

Better disciplinary structures in schools can help reduce hate speech directed against Asian American students

Bringing back an ancient bird

Wistar research identifies mechanisms for selective multiple sclerosis treatment strategy

Fatherhood’s hidden heart health toll

The importance of integrated therapies on cancer: Silibinin, an old and new molecule

Texas A&M-led team creates first global map of seafloor biodiversity activity

Light therapy increases brain connectivity following injury

Power imbalance in health care reveals impact of race and role on team dynamics and DEI efforts

NRG Oncology appoints new vice-chairs for their patient advocate committee

Why do Dyeing poison frogs tap dance?

UC Irvine study reveals circadian clock can be leveraged to enhance cancer immunotherapy

Cell-targeting technology allows researchers to isolate neuronal subpopulations and link them to behavioral states

When should you neuter or spay your dog?

[Press-News.org] Study finds ChatGPT shows promise as medication management tool, could help improve geriatric health care