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UNC Greensboro researcher approved for NCInnovation grant funding for lithium refining research

UNC Greensboro researcher approved for NCInnovation grant funding for lithium refining research
2024-05-17
(Press-News.org) UNC Greensboro researcher Hemali Rathnayake, Ph.D., has been approved for grant funding from NCInnovation to continue her work in developing a cost-effective and efficient lithium refining process for converting lithium into battery-grade lithium carbonate.

The grant approval is conditioned on standard next steps, including executed grant agreements and formal notification to government partners. This funding is part of NCInnovation’s larger mission to unlock the innovative potential of North Carolina’s world-class universities.

“From mobile phones to automobiles, our everyday modern lifestyle relies on lithium batteries. Purification of lithium is key to battery production, a critical emerging industry at home in Greensboro, our state and surrounding region, and globally. UNC Greensboro is proud of Dr. Hemali Rathnayake and the pioneering research she leads in the development of a cost-effective and efficient lithium refining process. The funding support from state legislators and NCInnovation is vital to continuing this applied research,” said Chancellor Franklin D. Gilliam, Jr.

“Dr. Rathnayake’s lithium refining solutions show incredible promise for North Carolina’s economy,” said Michelle Bolas, NCInnovation Executive Vice President and Chief Innovation Officer. “This work has the capability to help advance our mission to make North Carolina THE innovation state.”

Dr. Rathnayake has led the development of a cost-effective and efficient lithium refining process for converting lithium into battery-grade lithium carbonate (LCE). The global demand for lithium is experiencing substantial growth for its primary role in energy storage, electronic bikes, electrification of tools, and other battery-intense applications. North Carolina has a large and growing lithium and battery industry. Rathnayake’s refining technology has the potential to boost a sustainable domestic supply chain for lithium-based products.

UNC Greensboro researcher Hemali Rathnayake, Ph.D., has been approved for grant funding from NCInnovation to continue her work in developing a cost-effective and efficient lithium refining process for converting lithium into battery-grade lithium carbonate.

The grant approval is conditioned on standard next steps, including executed grant agreements and formal notification to government partners. This funding is part of NCInnovation’s larger mission to unlock the innovative potential of North Carolina’s world-class universities.

“From mobile phones to automobiles, our everyday modern lifestyle relies on lithium batteries. Purification of lithium is key to battery production, a critical emerging industry at home in Greensboro, our state and surrounding region, and globally. UNC Greensboro is proud of Dr. Hemali Rathnayake and the pioneering research she leads in the development of a cost-effective and efficient lithium refining process. The funding support from state legislators and NCInnovation is vital to continuing this applied research,” said Chancellor Franklin D. Gilliam, Jr.

“Dr. Rathnayake’s lithium refining solutions show incredible promise for North Carolina’s economy,” said Michelle Bolas, NCInnovation Executive Vice President and Chief Innovation Officer. “This work has the capability to help advance our mission to make North Carolina THE innovation state.”

Dr. Rathnayake has led the development of a cost-effective and efficient lithium refining process for converting lithium into battery-grade lithium carbonate (LCE). The global demand for lithium is experiencing substantial growth for its primary role in energy storage, electronic bikes, electrification of tools, and other battery-intense applications. North Carolina has a large and growing lithium and battery industry. Rathnayake’s refining technology has the potential to boost a sustainable domestic supply chain for lithium-based products.

UNC Greensboro researcher Hemali Rathnayake, Ph.D., has been approved for grant funding from NCInnovation to continue her work in developing a cost-effective and efficient lithium refining process for converting lithium into battery-grade lithium carbonate.

The grant approval is conditioned on standard next steps, including executed grant agreements and formal notification to government partners. This funding is part of NCInnovation’s larger mission to unlock the innovative potential of North Carolina’s world-class universities.

“From mobile phones to automobiles, our everyday modern lifestyle relies on lithium batteries. Purification of lithium is key to battery production, a critical emerging industry at home in Greensboro, our state and surrounding region, and globally. UNC Greensboro is proud of Dr. Hemali Rathnayake and the pioneering research she leads in the development of a cost-effective and efficient lithium refining process. The funding support from state legislators and NCInnovation is vital to continuing this applied research,” said Chancellor Franklin D. Gilliam, Jr.

“Dr. Rathnayake’s lithium refining solutions show incredible promise for North Carolina’s economy,” said Michelle Bolas, NCInnovation Executive Vice President and Chief Innovation Officer. “This work has the capability to help advance our mission to make North Carolina THE innovation state.”

Dr. Rathnayake has led the development of a cost-effective and efficient lithium refining process for converting lithium into battery-grade lithium carbonate (LCE). The global demand for lithium is experiencing substantial growth for its primary role in energy storage, electronic bikes, electrification of tools, and other battery-intense applications. North Carolina has a large and growing lithium and battery industry. Rathnayake’s refining technology has the potential to boost a sustainable domestic supply chain for lithium-based products.

UNC Greensboro researcher Hemali Rathnayake, Ph.D., has been approved for grant funding from NCInnovation to continue her work in developing a cost-effective and efficient lithium refining process for converting lithium into battery-grade lithium carbonate.

The grant approval is conditioned on standard next steps, including executed grant agreements and formal notification to government partners. This funding is part of NCInnovation’s larger mission to unlock the innovative potential of North Carolina’s world-class universities.

“From mobile phones to automobiles, our everyday modern lifestyle relies on lithium batteries. Purification of lithium is key to battery production, a critical emerging industry at home in Greensboro, our state and surrounding region, and globally. UNC Greensboro is proud of Dr. Hemali Rathnayake and the pioneering research she leads in the development of a cost-effective and efficient lithium refining process. The funding support from state legislators and NCInnovation is vital to continuing this applied research,” said Chancellor Franklin D. Gilliam, Jr.

“Dr. Rathnayake’s lithium refining solutions show incredible promise for North Carolina’s economy,” said Michelle Bolas, NCInnovation Executive Vice President and Chief Innovation Officer. “This work has the capability to help advance our mission to make North Carolina THE innovation state.”

Dr. Rathnayake has led the development of a cost-effective and efficient lithium refining process for converting lithium into battery-grade lithium carbonate (LCE). The global demand for lithium is experiencing substantial growth for its primary role in energy storage, electronic bikes, electrification of tools, and other battery-intense applications. North Carolina has a large and growing lithium and battery industry. Rathnayake’s refining technology has the potential to boost a sustainable domestic supply chain for lithium-based products.

END

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UNC Greensboro researcher approved for NCInnovation grant funding for lithium refining research

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[Press-News.org] UNC Greensboro researcher approved for NCInnovation grant funding for lithium refining research