PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Translating the Surgeon General’s framework on social isolation and loneliness to actionable steps in primary care

2024-05-28
(Press-News.org) Background & Goal: Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, 20% of adult primary care patients identified as lonely, representing a higher prevalence than many diseases commonly seen in primary care such as diabetes. Social isolation and loneliness are increasing over time, which is not only associated with increased health care utilization in primary care patients, but also with increased risk of chronic health conditions. Social isolation is reported to be equivalent to smoking 15 cigarettes per day in terms of premature death. The U.S. Surgeon General recently released an advisory entitled, “Our Epidemic of Loneliness and Isolation,” presenting a framework for action that includes three main pillars for the health care sector: 1) train health care clinicians, 2) assess and support patients, and 3) expand public health surveillance and interventions. In this paper, the authors summarize the Surgeon General’s framework and present actionable steps for implementing the framework in primary care.

Why This Matters: All health care professionals will encounter social isolation and loneliness in clinical settings. While social isolation and loneliness were historically not considered within the scope of clinical care—and hence, few systematic attempts have been made to address social isolation and loneliness—we are now at a critical juncture where the health care workforce must recognize this as a medical issue. Infrastructural support is needed, and the primary care sector can be instrumental in addressing this epidemic through prevention, early identification, education, and intervention.

The Role of Primary Care in the Social Isolation and Loneliness Epidemic

Sebastian T. Tong, MD, MPH, et al

Department of Family Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

PRE-EMBARGO LINK (Link expires at 5 p.m. EDT May 28th, 2024)

PERMANENT LINK 

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Point/counterpoint: Is prediabetes overdiagnosed?

2024-05-28
Background: Prediabetes, a diagnosis intended to identify high-risk persons and prevent progression to diabetes, has been a topic of ongoing debate, and experts continue to disagree about its screening criteria, interpretation, and implications. Author Stance: An epidemiologist and health services researcher argues that prediabetes is overdiagnosed. A prediabetes diagnosis for patients like herself who are at low risk of developing type 2 diabetes can cause more harm than good. They may experience undue distress, undergo unnecessary consultations and tests, and pay additional health care costs. It may be implied—incorrectly—that ...

Primary care clinics can help low-income families receive nutritional support benefits

2024-05-28
A research team designed a standardized process for helping low-income families navigate applications for federal nutrition support programs. Within a brief tablet-based nutrition screener completed at pediatric primary care visits, families were asked if they would like help applying for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. If they did, clinic staff followed up by telephone with application assistance. One limitation of this innovation is that some families were not able to be reached by telephone. Connecting ...

The wall of evidence for continuity of care

2024-05-28
Background: A long-term relationship between a patient and their doctor, known as continuity of care, has seen a decline in recent decades in both the UK and the U.S. This decline has negatively impacted patient and physician health outcomes and  well-being. Editorial Stance: Building on Terrence McDonald and colleagues' research, which distinguishes between the continuity contributions of a practice and an individual clinician, increased physician continuity has been linked to reduced emergency department ...

Parents of children with serious illness from Somali, Hmong, and Latin American communities desire better communication and support in pediatric health care

2024-05-28
Background and Goal: Nearly 500,000 children in the U.S. live with serious or life-threatening illnesses. Family caregivers, especially parents, face the challenges of managing complex medical needs, navigating the health system, and advocating for their children. This often leads to psychological distress, depression, and anxiety for caregivers. Understanding the experiences of parents of children with serious illnesses, especially those who are racially and ethnically diverse, remains limited. This study examined the experiences of Somali, Hmong, and Latin American parents in pediatric serious illness care, aiming to identify improvements and reduce disparities in pediatric ...

Primary care can improve hygienic practices while reducing waste

2024-05-28
Background & Goal: Exam table paper is perceived as necessary for hygienic care; however, there is limited evidence for its efficacy. It may not stop disease transmission, and it may create a false sense of cleanliness. The Ontario Guidelines for Prevention & Control of Infection in Healthcare Settings do not endorse exam table paper, but rather recommend cleaning with specific low-level disinfectants (for example, 0.5% accelerated hydrogen peroxide). Additionally, there are negative economic and climate change impacts of using exam table paper. The average clinic seeing ...

HKUST researchers enhance performance of eco-friendly cooling applications by developing sustainable strategy to manipulate interfacial heat transfer

HKUST researchers enhance performance of eco-friendly cooling applications by developing sustainable strategy to manipulate interfacial heat transfer
2024-05-28
Researchers at the School of Engineering of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have developed a sustainable and controllable strategy to manipulate interfacial heat transfer, paving the way for improving the performance of eco-friendly cooling in various applications such as electronics, buildings and solar panels. As demand for effective cooling solutions continues to grow due to the rising global temperature, scientists worldwide have been actively exploring energy-saving cooling technologies that are more effective. Compared to active cooling, which entirely depends on energy consumption ...

Variations in medical assistant to primary care clinician staffing ratios may reflect differences in practice ownership and organizational culture

2024-05-28
Background and goal: Medical assistants (MAs) are among the fastest growing occupations within the U.S. primary care workforce, and many practices have expanded the roles and caregiving responsibilities of primary care MAs. However, little is known about organizational factors associated with MA support levels for primary care clinicians (PCCs).  Study Approach: This study analyzed the current ratio of medical assistants (MAs) to primary care clinicians based on responses to the second National Survey of Healthcare Organizations and Systems (NSHOS II), a 52-question survey ...

Better disciplinary structures in schools can help reduce hate speech directed against Asian American students

2024-05-28
Asian Americans have been the targets of hate speech for generations, particularly during the COVID pandemic. But new research by the University of California, Davis, suggests that Asian American adolescents experience fewer incidents of hate speech in schools with stronger disciplinary structures and adult support.  A new study looks at hate speech experiences even before COVID, during the period between 2015 and 2019. The article, “Hate Speech Against Asian American Youth: Pre-Pandemic Trends and The Role of School Factors,” was published May 4 in the Journal of Youth and Adolescents. “Although hate against Asian American and Pacific Islander communities ...

Bringing back an ancient bird

Bringing back an ancient bird
2024-05-28
Using ancient DNA extracted from the toe bone of a museum specimen, Harvard biologists have sequenced the genome of an extinct, flightless bird called the little bush moa, shedding light into an unknown corner of avian genetic history. Published in Science Advances, the work is the first complete genetic map of the turkey-sized bird whose distant living cousins include the ostrich, emu, and kiwi. It is one of nine known species of moa, all extinct for the last 700 years, that inhabited New Zealand before the late 1200s and the arrival of Polynesian human settlers. “We’re pulling ...

Wistar research identifies mechanisms for selective multiple sclerosis treatment strategy

Wistar research identifies mechanisms for selective multiple sclerosis treatment strategy
2024-05-28
PHILADELPHIA — (May 28, 2024) — The Wistar Institute’s Paul M. Lieberman, Ph.D., and lab team led by senior staff scientist and first author, Samantha Soldan, Ph.D., have demonstrated how B cells infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can contribute to a pathogenic, inflammatory phenotype that contributes to multiple sclerosis (MS); the group has also shown how these problematic B cells can be selectively targeted in a way that reduces the damaging autoimmune response of multiple sclerosis. The lab’s findings were published in Nature Microbiology in the paper, “Multiple sclerosis patient derived spontaneous B cells have distinct EBV and ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Discovery of spontaneous inflow and outflow states of high-temperature plasma by energetic ions

Tax the rich, say a majority of adults across 17 G20 countries surveyed

Semaglutide leads to greater weight loss in women than men with HF, improves HF symptoms in both sexes

12.5, the 1st Impact Factor of COMMTR released!

Circadian clock impact on cluster headaches funded by $2.4M NIH grant for UTHealth Houston research

Study identifies first drug therapy for sleep apnea

How old is your bone marrow?

Boosting biodiversity without hurting local economies

ChatGPT is biased against resumes with credentials that imply a disability — but it can improve

Simple test for flu could improve diagnosis and surveillance

UT Health San Antonio researcher awarded five-year, $2.53 million NIH grant to study alcohol-assisted liver disease

Giving pre-med students hands-on clinical training

CAMH research suggests potential targets for prevention and early identification of psychotic disorders

Mapping the heart to prevent damage caused by a heart attack

Study challenges popular idea that Easter islanders committed ‘ecocide’

Chilling discovery: Study reveals evolution of human cold and menthol sensing protein, offering hope for future non-addictive pain therapies.

Elena Beccalli, new rector of Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, takes office on 1st July

Pacific Northwest Research Institute uncovers hidden DNA mechanisms of rare genetic diseases

Empowering older adults: Wearable tech made easier with personalized support

Pennington Biomedical researchers partner on award-winning Long Covid study

Cooling ‘blood oranges’ could make them even healthier – a bonus for consumers

Body image and overall health found important to the sexual health of older gay men, according to new studies

Lab-grown muscles reveal mysteries of rare muscle diseases

Primary hepatic angiosarcoma: Treatment options for a rare tumor

Research finds causal evidence tying cerebral small-vessel disease to Alzheimer’s, dementia

Navigating the Pyrocene: Recent Cell Press papers on managing fire risk

Restoring the Great Salt Lake would have environmental justice as well as ecological benefits

Cannabis, tobacco use, and COVID-19 outcomes

A 5:2 intermittent fasting meal replacement diet and glycemic control for adults with diabetes

Scientists document self-propelling oxygen decline in the oceans

[Press-News.org] Translating the Surgeon General’s framework on social isolation and loneliness to actionable steps in primary care