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Ocular assessments of newborns gestationally exposed to maternal COVID-19 infection

2021-04-07
(Press-News.org) What The Study Did: 
This case series examines whether maternal SARS-CoV-2 is associated with outcomes in the eyes of their newborns.

Authors:
Olívia Pereira Kiappe, M.D., M.Sc., of Universidade Federal de São Paulo in Brazil, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study:
Visit our For The Media website at this link
https://media.jamanetwork.com/ 

(doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2021.1088)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

INFORMATION:

Media advisory:
The full study is  linked to this news release.

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https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2021.1088?guestAccessKey=58613df6-e322-4424-bab0-d75dc07bed3b&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=040721



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[Press-News.org] Ocular assessments of newborns gestationally exposed to maternal COVID-19 infection