PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Childbearing delay among physicians, nonphysicians

2021-05-03
(Press-News.org) What The Study Did: Researchers compared the likelihood of delayed childbearing among physicians and nonphysicians.

Authors: Andrea N. Simpson, M.D., of the University of Toronto, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2021.1635)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflicts of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

INFORMATION:

Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/jamainternmed.2021.1635?guestAccessKey=6be9292e-9b69-41e4-9fd2-11e7ca562036&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=050321



ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Mating with relatives? Not a big deal in nature

2021-05-03
We usually assume that inbreeding is bad and should be avoided under all circumstances. But new research performed by researchers at Stockholm University, published in Nature Ecology and Evolution, shows that there is little support for this assumption. The idea that animals should avoid mating with relatives has been the starting point for hundreds of scientific studies performed among many species. But it turns out the picture is more complicated. "People assume that animals should avoid mating with a relative when given the chance", says Raïssa de Boer, researcher in zoology at Stockholm University. "But evolutionary theory has been telling us that animals should tolerate, or even prefer, mating with relatives under a broad range of conditions for more than four ...

Human organ chips enable COVID-19 drug repurposing

2021-05-03
A Wyss Institute-led collaboration spanning four research labs and hundreds of miles has used the Institute's organ-on-a-chip (Organ Chip) technology to identify the antimalarial drug amodiaquine as a potent inhibitor of infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The Organ Chip-based drug testing ecosystem established by the collaboration greatly streamlines the process of evaluating the safety and efficacy of existing drugs for new medical applications, and provides a proof-of-concept for the use of Organ Chips to rapidly repurpose existing drugs for new medical applications, including future pandemics. The research is reported in Nature Biomedical Engineering. While many groups around the ...

Earthquake, tsunami hazards from subduction zones might be higher than current estimates

Earthquake, tsunami hazards from subduction zones might be higher than current estimates
2021-05-03
Two of the most destructive forces of nature - earthquakes and tsunamis - might actually be more of a threat than current estimates according to new research conducted by scientists at The University of New Mexico and the Nanyang Technological University published today in Nature Geoscience. The researchers developed a new method to assess earthquake and tsunami hazards represented by the most distant part of offshore subduction zones and found that the hazard might have been systematically underestimated in some areas, meaning that tsunami risk assessments should be redone given the ...

GM grass cleanses soil of toxic pollutants left by military explosives, new study shows

GM grass cleanses soil of toxic pollutants left by military explosives, new study shows
2021-05-03
A grass commonly used to fight soil erosion has been genetically modified to successfully remove toxic chemicals left in the ground from munitions that are dangerous to human health, new research shows. The study - led by the University of York- demonstrates that genetically modified switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) can detoxify residues of the military explosive, RDX, left behind on live-fire training ranges, munitions dumps and minefields. RDX has been a major component of munitions since WW2 which are still used extensively on military training grounds. This use has now resulted in widespread pollution of groundwater. Researchers generated the plants by inserting two genes from bacteria able to breakdown RDX. The plants were then grown in RDX contaminated ...

Researchers wirelessly record human brain activity during normal life activities

Researchers wirelessly record human brain activity during normal life activities
2021-05-03
Researchers are now able to wirelessly record the directly measured brain activity of patients living with Parkinson's disease and to then use that information to adjust the stimulation delivered by an implanted device. Direct recording of deep and surface brain activity offers a unique look into the underlying causes of many brain disorders; however, technological challenges up to this point have limited direct human brain recordings to relatively short periods of time in controlled clinical settings. This project, published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, was funded by the National Institutes of Health's ...

CityU scientists invent cryomicroneedles for intradermal therapeutic cell delivery

2021-05-03
A research team led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) scientists recently developed a new generation of microneedles technology which allows the intradermal delivery of living cells in a minimally invasive manner. Their experiment showed that vaccination using therapeutic cells through this ground-breaking technology elicited robust immune responses against tumours in mice, paving the way for developing an easy-to-use cell therapy and other therapeutics against cancers and other diseases. The study was led by Dr Xu Chenjie, Associate Professor at the Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) at CityU. The latest findings have been published in the scientific journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, titled "Cryomicroneedles for Transdermal Cell Delivery". The new technology ...

Scientists find small molecule cocktail to improve stem cell use in research, medicine

2021-05-03
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have devised a four-part small-molecule cocktail that can protect stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from stress and maintain normal stem cell structure and function. The researchers suggest that the cocktail could enhance the potential therapeutic uses of stem cells, ranging from treating diseases and conditions -- such as diabetes, Parkinson's disease and spinal cord injury -- to genome editing. Human pluripotent stem cells are cells that, in theory, can grow forever and serve as an inexhaustible source for specialized cells, such as brain, kidney and heart cells. But stem cells are sensitive, and their potential uses in ...

Mini 3D brain models could speed up search for MS treatments

2021-05-03
Tiny 3-D models that mimic vital aspects of the human nervous system have been developed in a step that could accelerate drug research for neurological conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The millimetre-wide models - created using stem cells from human skin samples - will be used to study myelin, an insulating substance that helps nerve cells communicate with each other. Researchers say the models are the most natural representation of human myelination developed in a lab and are a promising platform for studying neurological diseases and for testing drugs for conditions linked to myelin loss, including MS. Nerve cells are found in the brain and the spinal cord and connect to each other with ...

COVID-19 conspiracy beliefs increased among users of conservative and social media

2021-05-03
PHILADELPHIA - Belief in conspiracies about the COVID-19 pandemic increased through the early months of the U.S. outbreak among people who reported being heavy users of conservative and social media, a study by Annenberg Public Policy Center (APPC) researchers has found. ...

Stress and mental health problems during first COVID-19-lockdown

2021-05-03
Many people in Switzerland experienced considerable psychological distress during the first COVID-19 lockdown from mid-March to the end of April 2020. Researchers from the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy at the University Hospital of Psychiatry Zurich (PUK) and the University of Zurich in collaboration with the La Source School of Nursing have now examined the most common sources of stress among children, adolescents, their parents and young adults. For their study, the researchers used representative samples in Switzerland of 1,627 young adults aged 19 to 24 as well as 1,146 children and adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 and their parents. Uncertainty, disruption, postponement "Uncertainty during last year's lockdown was considerable ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Worldwide network develops SARS-CoV-2 protocols for research laboratories

Sharks in protected area attract illegal fishers

Molecular tweezers that attack antibiotic resistant bacteria developed by Ben-Gurion U.

Cricket bats should be made from bamboo not willow, Cambridge study finds

Future-proofing mental health -- Experts set out research roadmap to prioritise key areas

Body mass index during childhood linked with risk of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa in later life

Combining BMI with body shape better predictor of cancer risk, suggests

Higher BMI, body fat, and larger waist and hips pose similar risk for

Higher BMI in childhood may help protect women against breast cancer in later life, both before and after the menopause

Research shows for the first time that protein complexes 'inflammasomes' are linked to obesity-related colon cancer

New Strep A human challenge model paves the way to test vaccines against the deadly bacteria

How proteins control information processing in the brain

Study supports recommendations to avoid pregnancy for at least 12 months after obesity surgery

Most comprehensive studies to date find 'insufficient evidence' to support herbal and dietary supplements for weight loss

Vegetarians have healthier levels of disease markers than meat-eaters

Switch of breast tumors to HER2-low in recurrence may provide greater therapeutic options

Mild COVID-19 infection is very unlikely to cause lasting heart damage

Ice core data show why, despite lower sulfur emissions in US and Western Europe, air pollution is dropping more slowly

The Lancet Rheumatology: Largest study to date confirms non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications do not result in worse COVID-19 outcomes

The legume family tree

New research sets stage for development of salmonella vaccine

New study examines social network's relation to binge drinking among adults

Archaeologists pinpoint population for the Greater Angkor region

Stop the genetic presses!

Sleep disorders tally $94.9 billion in health care costs each year

Turning a pancreatic cancer cell's addiction into a death sentence

How viruses and bacteria can reach drinking water wells

Latest peer-reviewed research: Immediate global ivermectin use will end COVID-19 pandemic

The structure of DNA is found to be actively involved in genome regulation

New innovation successfully treats neonatal hypothermia

[Press-News.org] Childbearing delay among physicians, nonphysicians