PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Tropical ginger treatment for blocking inflammation

Researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology identify antioxidant properties of a ginger-derived compound that may help fight inflammatory diseases

Tropical ginger treatment for blocking inflammation
2021-05-07
(Press-News.org) Ikoma, Japan - Many natural compounds have various anti-inflammatory and other beneficial properties that humans have been utilizing for medicinal purposes for hundreds of years. However, the specific molecular mechanisms behind these health-promoting effects are not always clear. One such compound is 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, or ACA, which comes from the tropical ginger Alpinia plant. Now, researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) have identified how ACA can help in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

In a report published in International Immunology, they found that ACA attenuates mitochondrial damage through decreasing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), blocking activation of a crucial protein complex known as the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Many inflammatory diseases, like inflammatory bowel disease, display improper and chronic activation of this complex.

Previous work has suggested that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a significant role in promoting inflammation by secreting a molecule called IL-1?. This acts as a messenger that recruits various immune cells to the site of injury or infection. Additional studies described how production of ROS can help trigger activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Because other groups showed that ACA can reduce ROS production in certain immune cells, the NAIST researchers became curious how this compound would impact the NLRP3 inflammasome and its functions.

"Many disease pathogeneses involve dysregulation of the inflammasome," says Daisuke Ori, co-lead author on the study. "Blood cells from people suffering from rheumatoid arthritis or other autoimmune disorders frequently have increased levels of inflammasome-derived IL-1?. Therefore, targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome with a compound like ACA may be a promising therapeutic strategy."

The researchers grew immune cells in culture that were obtained from mouse bone marrow, and also used a mouse model of colitis. ACA was added to the growing cells and the live mice were given the compound in their food. The researchers then examined the effects on ROS production, secretion of IL-1?, and other markers of inflammation.

"Cells treated with ACA had significantly reduced IL-1? production, as well as lower levels of ROS," explains Taro Kawai, senior author. "ACA could also inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the colitis mouse model." These in vivo results are promising, as they suggest ACA has the potential to treat or prevent the development of inflammatory diseases. "Interestingly, we did not observe high levels of immune cell death when using ACA, which means that it may be relatively safe," continues Ori.

This work provides novel evidence for a specific molecular mechanism governing the previously observed anti-inflammatory properties of ACA. Furthermore, it highlights the potential of ACA for therapeutic use in diseases mediated by IL-1? molecules, or associated with cytokine storm occurrence, as seen in patients suffering from severe COVID-19.

INFORMATION:

Resource

Title: 1?-acetoxychavicol acetate inhibits NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation via mitochondrial ROS suppression

Authors: Sophia P. M. Sok, Daisuke Ori, Ayana Wada, Haruna Okude, Takumi Kawasaki, Masatoshi Momota, Noor Hasima Nagoor & Taro Kawai

Journal: International Immunology

DOI: 10.1093/intimm/dxab016

Information about the Molecular Immunobiology Laboratory can be found at the following website: https://bsw3.naist.jp/eng/courses/courses209.html


[Attachments] See images for this press release:
Tropical ginger treatment for blocking inflammation

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Small apoptotic bodies: Nirvana, birth and death

2021-05-07
Scientists from Nanjing University and University of Macau have discovered nano-scaled apoptotic bodies (ABs) as a new brain-targeting drug carrier, bringing new promise for the Parkinson's Disease as well as other brain diseases. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the most restrictive barrier that keeps most biomolecules and drugs from the brain, setting "barriers" for the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. With the increasingly serious ageing problem, the treatment of brain diseases now faces tough challenges, and therefore efficient brain drug delivery ...

Supernovae twins open up new possibilities for precision cosmology

Supernovae twins open up new possibilities for precision cosmology
2021-05-07
Cosmologists have found a way to double the accuracy of measuring distances to supernova explosions - one of their tried-and-true tools for studying the mysterious dark energy that is making the universe expand faster and faster. The results from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) collaboration, led by Greg Aldering of the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), will enable scientists to study dark energy with greatly improved precision and accuracy, and provide a powerful crosscheck of the technique across vast distances ...

Researchers develop artificial intelligence that can detect sarcasm in social media

Researchers develop artificial intelligence that can detect sarcasm in social media
2021-05-07
Computer science researchers at the University of Central Florida have developed a sarcasm detector. Social media has become a dominant form of communication for individuals, and for companies looking to market and sell their products and services. Properly understanding and responding to customer feedback on Twitter, Facebook and other social media platforms is critical for success, but it is incredibly labor intensive. That's where sentiment analysis comes in. The term refers to the automated process of identifying the emotion -- either positive, negative or neutral -- associated with text. While ...

Having a ball: New English Premier League soccer ball more stable, drags more

Having a ball: New English Premier League soccer ball more stable, drags more
2021-05-07
Tsukuba, Japan - Scientists from the Faculty of Health and Sports Sciences at the University of Tsukuba used aerodynamics experiments to empirically test the flight properties of a new four-panel soccer ball adopted by the English Premier League this year. Based on projectile and wind-tunnel data, they computed the drag and side forces and found that the new ball was marginally more stable than previous versions but may not fly as far. This work may help improve the design of future sports equipment. Sports players know that millions of dollars in salary and potential endorsement deals can be at stake during each match. Soccer players often complain about the aerodynamic ...

Winning gene combination takes all

Winning gene combination takes all
2021-05-07
Researchers have traced the remaining last steps of the biological pathway that gives oats resistance to the deadly crop disease take-all. The discovery creates opportunities for new ways of defending wheat and other cereals against the soil-borne root disease. The research team have already taken the first step in this aim by successfully reconstituting the self-defence system in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. Further experiments to establish the avenacin biosynthetic pathway in wheat's more complex genome, to test if it will provide the same resistance ...

Hologram experts can now create real-life images that move in the air

Hologram experts can now create real-life images that move in the air
2021-05-07
They may be tiny weapons, but Brigham Young University's holography research group has figured out how to create lightsabers -- green for Yoda and red for Darth Vader, naturally -- with actual luminous beams rising from them. Inspired by the displays of science fiction, the researchers have also engineered battles between equally small versions of the Starship Enterprise and a Klingon Battle Cruiser that incorporate photon torpedoes launching and striking the enemy vessel that you can see with the naked eye. "What you're seeing in the scenes we create is real; there is nothing computer generated about them," said lead researcher Dan Smalley, a professor of electrical engineering at BYU. "This is not like the movies, where the lightsabers ...

Navigating the COVID-19 crisis to prevent pressure injuries: Learning health system helped one hospital adapt and update care in real time

2021-05-07
May 7, 2021 - Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare systems scrambled to modify patient care processes - particularly when it came to strategies aimed at reducing the risk of hospital-related complications. A look at how one hospital applied its learning health system (LHS) framework to respond to a COVID-19-related increase in hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs) is presented in the May/June Journal for Healthcare Quality (JHQ), the peer-reviewed journal of the National Association for Healthcare Quality (NAHQ). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. "Given the significant challenges ...

Cutting-edge: New and improved drug to counter spinal anesthesia blues during C-sections

Cutting-edge: New and improved drug to counter spinal anesthesia blues during C-sections
2021-05-07
Today, deliveries via cesarean sections, or c-sections, have become quite common globally. Sometimes, c-sections are a medical necessity when normal deliveries become risky either for the mother or the baby. At other times, it can be a choice. C-sections today have become a considerably safer procedure than it was a few decades ago, but there is need to refine it further. In a END ...

New study determines cystic fibrosis therapy is safe and effective for young children

New study determines cystic fibrosis therapy is safe and effective for young children
2021-05-07
Children ages two to five who have the most common form of cystic fibrosis (CF), caused by two copies of the F508 gene mutation, have not had any modulator treatments available to them until recently. A new study authored by researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado and published May 6, 2021, in Lancet Respiratory Medicine shows that the CFTR modulator - lumacaftor/ivacaftor - can be safe and well-tolerated for this age range for up to 120 weeks, allowing younger children to begin proactive treatment of CF earlier in their lives. CF affects more than 70,000 people worldwide and is a chronic, progressive, life-shortening genetic disease caused by an absent or defective protein called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, resulting from mutations in both copies ...

Emissions from human activity modify biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation

Emissions from human activity modify biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation
2021-05-07
Despite their extremely small size, submicron atmospheric aerosols are critical pollutants with climate change, air quality, and human health implications. Of these particles, secondary organic aerosols (SOA) form when volatile organic compounds (VOCs) oxidize to lower volatility products that bond with and increase aerosol particle size, or in some cases, they may simply exist by themselves. SOA constitutes a significant fraction of the global aerosol mass. Scientists are attempting to improve future aerosol modeling, but several discrepancies still exist between model-simulated and field-observed SOA budgets. ''Large uncertainties in model assessments of SOA budgets and correspondingly, its climate effects, ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Scientists model 'true prevalence' of COVID-19 throughout pandemic

New breakthrough to help immune systems in the fight against cancer

Through the thin-film glass, researchers spot a new liquid phase

Administering opioids to pregnant mice alters behavior and gene expression in offspring

Brain's 'memory center' needed to recognize image sequences but not single sights

Safety of second dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines after first-dose allergic reactions

Changes in disparities in access to care, health after Medicare eligibility

Use of high-risk medications among lonely older adults

65+ and lonely? Don't talk to your doctor about another prescription

Exosome formulation developed to deliver antibodies for choroidal neovascularization therapy

Second COVID-19 mRNA vaccine dose found safe following allergic reactions to first dose

Plant root-associated bacteria preferentially colonize their native host-plant roots

Rare inherited variants in previously unsuspected genes may confer significant risk for autism

International experts call for a unified public health response to NAFLD and NASH epidemic

International collaboration of scientists rewrite the rulebook of flowering plant genetics

Improving air quality reduces dementia risk, multiple studies suggest

Misplaced trust: When trust in science fosters pseudoscience

Two types of blood pressure meds prevent heart events equally, but side effects differ

New statement provides path to include ethnicity, ancestry, race in genomic research

Among effective antihypertensive drugs, less popular choice is slightly safer

Juicy past of favorite Okinawan fruit revealed

Anticipate a resurgence of respiratory viruses in young children

Anxiety, depression, burnout rising as college students prepare to return to campus

Goal-setting and positive parent-child relationships reduce risk of youth vaping

New research identifies cancer types with little survival improvements in adolescents and young adul

Oncotarget: Replication-stress sensitivity in breast cancer cells

Oncotarget: TERT and its binding protein: overexpression of GABPA/B in gliomas

Development of a novel technology to check body temperature with smartphone camera

The mechanics of puncture finally explained

Extreme heat, dry summers main cause of tree death in Colorado's subalpine forests

[Press-News.org] Tropical ginger treatment for blocking inflammation
Researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology identify antioxidant properties of a ginger-derived compound that may help fight inflammatory diseases