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How a unique sponge 'goes with the flow' could improve man-made structures

Collaborative project taps one of the world's most powerful supercomputers to reveal the water-bending skills of the Venus basket sponge. Insights could have implications for man-made craft and structures

2021-07-21
(Press-News.org) BROOKLYN, New York, Weekday, Month xx, 2021 - The remarkable structural properties of the Venus' flower basket sponge (E. aspergillum) might seem fathoms removed from human-engineered structures. However, insights into how the organism's latticework of holes and ridges influences the hydrodynamics of seawater in its vicinity could lead to advanced designs for buildings, bridges, marine vehicles and aircraft, and anything that must respond safely to forces imposed by the flow of air or water.

While past research has investigated the structure of the sponge, there have been few studies of the hydrodynamic fields surrounding and penetrating the organism, and whether, besides improving its mechanical properties, the skeletal motifs of E. Aspergillum underlie the optimization of the flow physics within and beyond its body cavity.

A collaboration across three continents at the frontiers of physics, biology, and engineering co-led by END


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[Press-News.org] How a unique sponge 'goes with the flow' could improve man-made structures
Collaborative project taps one of the world's most powerful supercomputers to reveal the water-bending skills of the Venus basket sponge. Insights could have implications for man-made craft and structures