PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

NASA announces future launch for USU-led space weather mission

The Atmospheric Waves Experiment, led by USU's SDL and College of Science, is set for a December launch

NASA announces future launch for USU-led space weather mission
2023-03-17
(Press-News.org) NORTH LOGAN, UTAH - NASA has announced that the launch of the Utah State University Space Dynamics Laboratory and College of Science-led Atmospheric Waves Experiment, or AWE, is scheduled for December 2023. The NASA-funded instrument will launch from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station to the International Space Station.

AWE Principal Investigator Michael Taylor from USU’s College of Science leads a team of scientists that will provide new details about how the weather on Earth interacts with, and affects, space weather. To do that, the AWE instrument, measuring about 54 centimeters by 1 meter and weighing less than 57 kilograms, will peer into Earth’s upper atmosphere from an orbit of about 400 kilometers above to provide unprecedented images of Earth’s gravity waves as they rise through the mesopause, the mesosphere’s upper boundary, and into other parts of the ionosphere.

Atmospheric gravity waves are generated by weather events on Earth, including strong winds that shoot upward as they collide with large mountains, hurricanes that create gravity waves directly through high winds and indirectly by interacting with underlying topography, and seismic activities such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

Impacts from atmospheric gravity waves and space weather can adversely affect satellites that provide seemingly ubiquitous services across the globe and for human spaceflight missions. Communications, banking, navigation and entertainment largely depend on spacecraft that receive ground data and beam information to Earth. New knowledge from AWE will help scientists more accurately forecast the effect of atmospheric gravity waves and space weather on satellite communications and enable mission planners and satellite operators to plan contingencies.

“The mesopause is our porthole to space weather, through which Earth’s atmospheric gravity waves that affect space weather must pass,” said Taylor, professor in USU’s Department of Physics. “From Earth, as in space, we can sometimes see this region of the atmosphere when it produces colorful bands of light known as airglow. Scientists have been studying atmospheric gravity waves from the ground for decades. AWE will allow for observations from space for the first time and provide us with new information about interactions between the waves and space weather.”

USU’s Space Dynamics Laboratory is responsible for AWE’s total project management, systems engineering, safety and mission assurance, and on-orbit operations.

“Following a rigorous calibration and test campaign to ensure that the science instrument is flight ready, SDL is making preparations for AWE’s safe storage until it is shipped to Cape Canaveral,” said Burt Lamborn, SDL’s AWE project manager. “SDL is looking forward to the December launch of AWE, but our work will not be finished. We are honored to work with NASA’s Heliophysics team and Dr. Taylor as SDL leads mission operations once the instrument is launched and integrated onto the ISS.”

USU has been involved in space research for nearly seven decades and is a NASA Space Grant university. However, AWE is a major milestone for USU. It represents the first time the university has served as a total mission provider for a major NASA program. USU is providing the principal investigator, manufacturing the science instrument, and leading on-orbit and mission operations management.

AWE is a Mission of Opportunity under NASA’s Heliophysics Explorers Program, which conducts innovative, streamlined scientific investigations by developing instrumentation to answer focused science questions that augment and complement the agency’s larger missions. AWE joins a fleet of heliophysics missions positioned at key places around the solar system, which together seek to understand the way the constant outflow of energy and particles from our sun affects interplanetary space — information that not only teaches us more about our astrophysical neighborhood, but helps protect astronauts and technology in space.

USU’s Department of Physics is among six academic departments of the College of Science. As part of a land- and space-grant university, the college’s mission is to create, share, and apply new knowledge to inspire scientific solutions to global challenges. USU physics students develop valuable research and critical thinking skills with professors engaged in world-class research programs. For more information, visit www.physics.usu.edu.

Headquartered on Utah State University’s Innovation Campus in North Logan, Utah, the Space Dynamics Laboratory is a nonprofit organization and a Department of Defense University Affiliated Research Center owned by USU. More than 1,000 dedicated SDL engineers, scientists, business professionals, and student employees solve technical challenges faced by the military, science community, and industry and support NASA’s vision to explore the secrets of the universe for the benefit of all. SDL has field offices in Albuquerque, New Mexico; Chantilly, Virginia; Dayton, Ohio; Huntsville, Alabama; Ogden, Utah; and Stafford, Virginia. For more information, visit www.sdl.usu.edu.

The material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Contract Number 80GSFC18C0007. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of NASA.

END

[Attachments] See images for this press release:
NASA announces future launch for USU-led space weather mission

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Quantum sensing in outer space: New NASA-funded research will build next-gen tech to better measure climate

Quantum sensing in outer space: New NASA-funded research will build next-gen tech to better measure climate
2023-03-17
Texas Engineers are leading a multi-university research team that will build technology and tools to improve measurement of important climate factors by observing atoms in outer space.  They will focus on the concept of quantum sensing, which use quantum physics principles to potentially collect more precise data and enable unprecedented science measurements. These sensors could help satellites in orbit collect data about how atoms react to small changes in their environment, and using that to infer the ...

Scientists identify the mechanisms leading to resistance to lung cancer treatment with Sotorasib, the first KRAS inhibitor

Scientists identify the mechanisms leading to resistance to lung cancer treatment with Sotorasib, the first KRAS inhibitor
2023-03-17
A collaborative study carried out by the groups of Matthias Drosten, principal investigator at the Cancer Research Center (CSIC- University of Salamanca), and Mariano Barbacid, head of the Experimental Oncology group at the CNIO, reveals the mechanisms responsible for the development of tumor resistance to Sotorasib, the first approved inhibitor against the KRAS oncogene. The study, recently published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, shows that lung tumor cells can rapidly adapt to this drug by increasing the number of copies of the mutated KRAS gene targeted by the treatment and by increased expression of xenobiotic pathways that limit ...

Fossil site is ‘Rosetta Stone’ for understanding early life

Fossil site is ‘Rosetta Stone’ for understanding early life
2023-03-17
Fossil site is ‘Rosetta Stone’ for understanding early life Leading edge technology has uncovered secrets about a world-renowned fossil hoard that could offer vital clues about early life on earth. Researchers who analysed the 400 million-year-old-cache, found in rural north-east Scotland, say their findings reveal better preservation of the fossils at a molecular level than was previously anticipated. Fresh scrutiny of the exquisitely preserved treasure trove from Aberdeenshire has enabled scientists to identify the chemical fingerprints of the various organisms within ...

3D-printed revolving devices can sense how they are moving

3D-printed revolving devices can sense how they are moving
2023-03-17
Integrating sensors into rotational mechanisms could make it possible for engineers to build smart hinges that know when a door has been opened, or gears inside a motor that tell a mechanic how fast they are rotating. MIT engineers have now developed a way to easily integrate sensors into these types of mechanisms, with 3D printing. Even though advances in 3D printing enable rapid fabrication of rotational mechanisms, integrating sensors into the designs is still notoriously difficult. Due to the complexity of the rotating parts, sensors are typically embedded manually, after the device has already ...

Tackling gambling harm among Armed Forces veterans

Tackling gambling harm among Armed Forces veterans
2023-03-17
Swansea University News Release 17 March 2023 £1 million for projects involving Swansea experts to tackle gambling harm among Armed Forces veterans Research to tackle gambling harm among Armed Forces veterans has received a major boost with three awards, totalling £1 million, for new projects in the field that involve Swansea University experts. The projects include evaluating a smartphone app for veterans with gambling disorder and PTSD, which is aimed at reducing symptoms,  The three projects ...

Rivers and streams in the Andean Cordillera are hot spots for greenhouse gases emissions

2023-03-17
A new scientific study by researchers from the University of Liège (Belgium) shows that rivers in the Andean mountains contribute 35% and 72% of riverine emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and methane (CH4 ) in the Amazon basin, the world's largest river. This study is published in the journal Communications Earth & Environment. Rivers contribute substantially to global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). The Amazon River, the World's largest river, plays an important role in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It is the largest river on the planet in terms of freshwater flow," explains Alberto Borges, ...

Dual-task walking performance may be an early indicator of accelerated brain aging

2023-03-17
Boston, MA -- Walking is a complex task that is most commonly performed while completing other tasks like talking, reading signs, or making decisions. For most, after the age of 65, such “dual tasking” worsens walking performance and may even cause unsteadiness. Intriguingly, older adults that are more affected by dual tasking are at higher risk of suffering adverse health outcomes, including both falls and dementia.   A new research study published in Lancet Healthy Longevity has reported that the ability to dual task when walking starts to decline by the age of 55, up to a decade before ‘old ...

New study counts the environmental cost of managing Japanese knotweed

New study counts the environmental cost of managing Japanese knotweed
2023-03-17
New Swansea University research has looked at the long-term environmental impact of different methods to control Japanese knotweed. The invasive species has been calculated to cost more than £165 million to manage every year in the UK alone. Its presence can blight property purchases for households across the country. This has led to the development of different ways of trying to control it but with sustainability becoming increasingly important, understanding the effect of these management methods is vital. A new study, led by biosciences lecturer Dr Sophie Hocking and looking ...

Discovery of an unexpected function of blood immune cells : Their ability to proliferate !

Discovery of an unexpected function of blood immune cells : Their ability to proliferate !
2023-03-17
The ability of a cell to divide, to proliferate, is essential for life and gives rise to the formation of complex organisms from a single cell. It also allows the replacement of used cells from a limited number of “stem” cells, which then proliferate and specialize. In cancer, however, cell proliferation is no longer controlled and becomes chaotic. Researchers from the GIGA Institute at the University of Liège have discovered that, in a healthy individual, certain blood immune cells, the monocytes, ...

Women working rotating shifts especially likely to be frail, York study finds

2023-03-17
March 17, 2023, TORONTO —  A new study led by researchers at York University has found a link between shift work and frailty among middle-aged and older workers in Canada, especially for women on rotating shifts.  While there is a large body of research suggesting the disruptions to circadian rhythms that shift workers experience are linked to various illnesses, this study was the first to take a comprehensive or “holistic” look at the connection between shift work and frailty.  “We cannot ignore the negative health outcomes related to shift work, including cardiovascular diseases, ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Polymer research aims to expand possibilities in sensor technology

New therapeutic avenues in bone repair

Socioeconomic status transition throughout life and risk of dementia

Climbing the social ladder slows dementia, Japanese study reveals

Researchers discover hidden step in dinosaur feather evolution

Studies reveal cell-by-cell changes caused when pig hearts and kidneys are transplanted into humans

SRI earns FDA Orphan Drug Designation for pancreatic cancer

A new gene-editing system tackles complex diseases

Tracking down toxic metals from tobacco smoke

Clarifying the cellular mechanisms underlying periodontitis with an improved animal model

Age, race impact AI performance on digital mammograms

SwRI leads courses at 2024 Society of Tribologists & Lubrication Engineers Annual Meeting

Hope for a cure for visceral leishmaniasis, an often fatal infectious disease

How AI helps programming a quantum computer

New research reveals that prehistoric seafloor pockmarks off the California coast are maintained by powerful sediment flows

AI can help improve ER admission decisions, Mount Sinai study finds

Matcha mouthwash inhibits bacteria that causes periodontitis

Oncology events in Poland solidify collaboration with NCCN

City of Hope awarded $5.4 million CIRM grant to create a stem cell laboratory and expand access to state-of-the-art disease models and technology among a diverse scientific community

Meeting preview: Hot topics at NUTRITION 2024

Study models how ketamine’s molecular action leads to its effects on the brain

A diaspora-based model of human migration

Black and Hispanic Americans experience wider temperature swings

Gamers say they hate ‘smurfing,’ but admit they do it

How immune cells recognize the abnormal metabolism of cancer cells

How plants mate for life and repel other suitors

3D printing robot uses AI machine learning for US Army research

Ruptured Achilles tendon shows faster repair amid plasma irradiation treatment

Screen time not the main factor making parent-child interactions worse, study finds

Improving the effectiveness of earthquake early warning systems

[Press-News.org] NASA announces future launch for USU-led space weather mission
The Atmospheric Waves Experiment, led by USU's SDL and College of Science, is set for a December launch