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Does birth by cesarean section affect children’s academic performance and intelligence?

2023-03-22
(Press-News.org) In a study of Danish children born between 1978–2000, chances of graduating from lower and upper secondary education were significantly lower for children born by cesarean section (CS). However, differences in grade point averages and intelligence scores were very small. The study, which is published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, also found that males born by CS had a lower likelihood of appearing before a conscription board for drafting into the military.

In Denmark, most students are 6–16 years old while in lower secondary education (LSE) and 16–17 years old when initiating upper secondary education (USE). Also, all Danish male citizens must appear before a Danish conscription board for military or civil service, unless one of the board’s doctors declares the person unfit for service prior to the examination.

“Cesarean section is a fairly common procedure. Luckily children born by cesarean section do not seem to perform less in the Danish educational and conscription system compared with children born by vaginal delivery; however, they do seem to have lower chances of attending education and conscription,” said first author Agnes Kielgast Ladelund, MD, of Herlev Hospital in Denmark. “These are interesting results, relevant for the nationwide discussion of pros and cons concerning cesarean section.”

URL upon publication: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/aogs.14535

 

Additional Information
NOTE: The information contained in this release is protected by copyright. Please include journal attribution in all coverage. For more information or to obtain a PDF of any study, please contact: Sara Henning-Stout, newsroom@wiley.com.

About the Journal
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica is an international journal dedicated to providing the very latest information on the results of both clinical, basic and translational research work related to all aspects of women’s health from around the globe.

About Wiley
Wiley is one of the world’s largest publishers and a global leader in scientific research and career-connected education. Founded in 1807, Wiley enables discovery, powers education, and shapes workforces. Through its industry-leading content, digital platforms, and knowledge networks, the company delivers on its timeless mission to unlock human potential. Visit us at Wiley.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram.

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[Press-News.org] Does birth by cesarean section affect children’s academic performance and intelligence?