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Does care during pregnancy differ based on patient race in the United States?

2023-03-22
(Press-News.org) In an analysis of perinatal care provided in the United States, investigators found few differences by race for care that was based on guidelines or expert recommendations; however, discretionary care (for which professional recommendations or guidelines do not exist) varied by race.

The analysis, which is published in Birth, included information from the electronic health records for 7,056 women who delivered infants within a large hospital system between 2012 and 2018. Compared with Non-Hispanic white women, Non-Hispanic Black women were 20% less likely to receive a prenatal depression screen and 60% more likely to have a urine drug test when denying drug use, while Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Asian women were 40% and 60% less likely, respectively, to have a urine drug test completed when denying drug use.

“Greater efforts need to be made to identify and mitigate providers’ implicit and explicit biases; expanded professional guidelines may offer some protections against inequitable, discretionary care,” the authors wrote.

URL upon publication: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/birt.12717

 

Additional Information
NOTE: The information contained in this release is protected by copyright. Please include journal attribution in all coverage. For more information or to obtain a PDF of any study, please contact: Sara Henning-Stout, newsroom@wiley.com.

About the Journal
Birth is a multidisciplinary, refereed journal devoted to issues and practices in the care of childbearing women, infants, and families. It is written by and for professionals in maternal and neonatal health, nurses, midwives, physicians, public health workers, doulas, social scientists, childbirth educators, lactation counselors, epidemiologists, and other health caregivers and policymakers in perinatal care.

About Wiley
Wiley is one of the world’s largest publishers and a global leader in scientific research and career-connected education. Founded in 1807, Wiley enables discovery, powers education, and shapes workforces. Through its industry-leading content, digital platforms, and knowledge networks, the company delivers on its timeless mission to unlock human potential. Visit us at Wiley.com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram.

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[Press-News.org] Does care during pregnancy differ based on patient race in the United States?