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SwRI’s Dr. Peter Lee named STLE Fellow

Lee was recognized for contributions to tribology, lubrication engineering at 2023 STLE annual meeting, May 21-25

SwRI’s Dr. Peter Lee named STLE Fellow
2023-05-24
(Press-News.org) SAN ANTONIO — May 24, 2023 —Dr. Peter Lee of Southwest Research Institute’s Tribology Research and Evaluations Section has been named a Fellow of the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE).

An STLE fellowship recognizes society members with significant contributions over 20 years of active practice in the field of tribology and lubrication engineering. These contributions must meet a standard considered by STLE above and beyond those typically expected of a scientist or engineer. Tribology is the study of lubrication, friction and wear, and STLE Fellows are considered authorities in the field. As of 2022, only 187 individuals have been granted this recognition.

Lee founded SwRI’s tribology laboratory in 2011. The lab’s work has helped the Institute become an internationally recognized center for cutting-edge tribology research and testing.

“It is an honor to be recognized by my colleagues in the tribology and lubrication engineering field,” Lee said. “SwRI’s tribology team comes to work every day to tackle the diverse challenges that our dynamic field presents. It is heartening to know that our efforts are being seen and acknowledged by our peers.”

Lee holds the title of Institute Engineer at SwRI. Alongside Institute Scientist, Institute Engineer is the highest technical level for SwRI’s research staff. Institute engineers and scientists are recognized for their extensive knowledge and achievements and serve as leaders within the SwRI community. They also serve on the SwRI Advisory Committee for Research, which oversees the Institute’s internal research program.

Originally from the United Kingdom, Lee holds a bachelor’s degree in automotive engineering and a Ph.D. in engine tribology from the University of Leeds, where he was a Royal Academy of Engineering Research Fellow. His principal research interest is in the field of energy efficiency, primarily achieved using tribology.

Lee has helped grow SwRI’s tribology laboratory from a 530-square-foot facility with two employees to more than 3,000 square feet of tribology laboratory space and roughly a dozen employees. These facilities include several tribometers and custom rigs designed by Lee and his SwRI colleagues to meet specific customer requirements. The laboratory offers testing, consultation, training and failure analysis for clients in a variety of industries from automotive research to cosmetics.

Lee holds eight patents with six pending, has published 30 papers and presented more than 110 technical papers and seminars domestically and abroad. In 2018, he was named a Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, the highest level of membership within the organization.

Lee is a director of the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers, and he is a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the American Society of Testing Materials. He is an adjunct professor at Texas A&M University, serves on several editorial boards for tribology journals and is a life member of the Tribology Society of India.

Lee and the rest of the 2023 STLE Fellow cohort was recognized at a special dinner during the 77th STLE Annual Meeting and Exhibition in Long Beach, California, May 21-25. STLE Fellows must be society members for 10 years, have over 20 years of active practice in a science or engineering profession, be nominated by the Fellows Committee and be approved by the STLE’s Board of Directors.

For more information, visit https://www.swri.org/fuels-lubricants/tribology.

END

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SwRI’s Dr. Peter Lee named STLE Fellow

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[Press-News.org] SwRI’s Dr. Peter Lee named STLE Fellow
Lee was recognized for contributions to tribology, lubrication engineering at 2023 STLE annual meeting, May 21-25