PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Cannabis use disorder and subsequent risk of psychotic and nonpsychotic unipolar depression and bipolar disorder

JAMA Psychiatry

2023-05-24
(Press-News.org) About The Study: This study of 6.6 million individuals in Demark found that cannabis use disorder was associated with an increased risk of psychotic and nonpsychotic bipolar disorder and unipolar depression. These findings may inform policies regarding the legal status and control of cannabis use.

Authors: Oskar Hougaard Jefsen, M.D., of Aarhus University Hospital–Psychiatry in Aarhus, Denmark, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2023.1256)

Editor’s Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

#  #  #

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2023.1256?guestAccessKey=67aec3cc-eee4-495d-8e74-316ead89de34&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=052423

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Quantum matter breakthrough: Tuning density waves

Quantum matter breakthrough: Tuning density waves
2023-05-24
“Cold atomic gases were well known in the past for the ability to ‘program’ the interactions between atoms,” says Professor Jean-Philippe Brantut at EPFL. “Our experiment doubles this ability!” Working with the group of Professor Helmut Ritsch at the University of Innsbruck, they have made a breakthrough that can impact not only quantum research but quantum-based technologies in the future. Density waves Scientists have long been interested in understanding how materials self-organize into complex structures, such as crystals. In the often-arcane world of quantum physics, ...

Fewer suicides among boys in regions with more bipolar diagnoses

2023-05-24
Bipolar disorder underlies roughly five percent of all suicides among young people. Previous studies also show that there is often a long delay between the onset of bipolarism and its correct diagnosis and treatment. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet now show that fewer boys commit suicide in Swedish regions where bipolar diagnoses are more common. The study, which is published in JAMA Psychiatry, could contribute to more proactive care for reducing the number of suicides. “Bipolar disorder is often more distressing for people who develop it early in life and is one of the psychiatric disorders most associated with suicide risk,” says ...

Scientists find first evidence for new superconducting state in Ising superconductor

Scientists find first evidence for new superconducting state in Ising superconductor
2023-05-24
In a ground-breaking experiment, scientists from the University of Groningen, together with colleagues from the Dutch universities of Nijmegen and Twente and the Harbin Institute of Technology (China), have discovered the existence of a superconductive state that was first predicted in 2017. They present evidence for a special variant of the FFLO superconductive state on 24 May in the journal Nature. This discovery could have significant applications, particularly in the field of superconducting electronics. The lead author of the paper is Professor Justin Ye, who heads the Device Physics of Complex Materials group at the University of Groningen. Ye and his team have ...

Where do our limbs come from?

2023-05-24
For Immediate Release Contact:  Mark Couch, 303-724-5377, mark.couch@cuanschutz.edu   Where Do Our Limbs Come From?             AURORA, Colo. (May 24, 2023) – An international collaboration that includes scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has uncovered new clues about the origin of paired appendages – a major evolutionary step that remains unresolved and highly debated. The researchers describe their study in an article published today in the journal Nature. “This has become ...

In resistance training, focusing on load or number of repetitions leads to same muscle growth

2023-05-24
Which kind of resistance training promotes more muscle growth: low load with many repetitions or high load with fewer repetitions? According to a study conducted at the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) in São Paulo state, Brazil, it makes no difference.  The study lasted eight weeks and involved 18 volunteers in two different training protocols. One group performed high-load (HL) exercises with fewer repetitions, while the other did low-load (LL) exercises with more repetitions. Muscle mass was measured in the first and last exercise sessions. A comparison of the two groups did not show any difference in muscle growth or metabolic stress, measured in an ...

Why do some long Covid patients continue to have difficulty exercising?

2023-05-24
While some patients recover from the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection, others have experienced the aftereffects of COVID-19 long after the initial infection. One of these long COVID symptoms is reduced exercise capacity. But questions remain about the mechanisms underlying why some COVID patients continue to experience diminished exercise capacity while others recover without this condition. In a study recently published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, a team of researchers from UC San Francisco found that lower than expected exercise capacity was common ...

AI used to advance drug delivery system for glaucoma and other chronic diseases

2023-05-24
Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have used artificial intelligence models and machine-learning algorithms to successfully predict which components of amino acids that make up therapeutic proteins are most likely to safely deliver therapeutic drugs to animal eye cells.   The project, a collaboration with researchers from the University of Maryland, holds promise for advancing new and more tolerable drug treatments for common chronic blinding eye diseases, including glaucoma and macular degeneration, which affect 3 million and about 20 million people in the United States, respectively. Current drug therapies ...

Epigenetic profiling identifies potential COPD treatment targets

2023-05-24
Impaired function of lung fibroblast is considered causative for symptoms of the incurable lung disease COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). Using high-resolution epigenetic profiling, German and British scientists have now identified potential targets for COPD treatment. The team detected early epigenetic changes in the genome of COPD fibroblasts, providing new insights into the disease pathogenesis and potential therapeutic avenues. COPD, affecting approximately 600 million people globally, is characterized by chronic inflammation, progressive airway narrowing, and alveolar destruction. Despite its global prevalence, ...

CHOP researchers comprehensively assess the safety of using your head in youth soccer

2023-05-24
Philadelphia, May 24, 2023 – Repeatedly heading a soccer ball has been previously associated with negative long-term brain health for professional players. However, in a new study from researchers at the Minds Matter Concussion Program at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), a small number of repeated soccer headers equivalent to a throw-in did not cause immediate neurophysiological deficits for teens, suggesting that limited soccer heading exposure in youth sports may not result in irreversible harm if players are properly trained. The ...

Case study reveals potentially lethal side effects of lecanemab for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Case study reveals potentially lethal side effects of lecanemab for treatment of Alzheimers disease
2023-05-24
Amsterdam, May 24, 2023 – In a noteworthy case study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease investigators report autopsy findings in a 65-year-old woman with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) who received three open label infusions of the experimental anti-amyloid beta (Aβ) antibody drug lecanemab. Four days after the last infusion, she experienced stroke symptoms and died several days later due to multifocal intracerebral hemorrhage despite attempts at therapeutic intervention. Neuropathologic findings reflected ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Federal Trade Commission actions on prescription drugs, 2000-2022

Fluoride exposure during pregnancy linked to increased risk of childhood neurobehavioral problems, study finds

The Ukraine war caused migrating eagles to deviate from their usual flight plan

Endangered migrating eagles impacted by Ukraine war

Study explores association between fluoride exposure in pregnancy and neurobehavioral issues in young children

Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy to design safer, higher-performance lithium batteries

Should your exercise goals be in minutes or steps? Study suggests they are equally beneficial

Racial and ethnic inequities in cancer care continuity during the COVID-19 pandemic among those with SARS-CoV-2

Effect of sleep restriction on adolescent cognition by adiposity

Webb Telescope offers first glimpse of an exoplanet’s interior

Alkyl-aromatic hybrid micelles formed from emergent umbrella-shaped molecules

First study from the African Ancestry Neuroscience Research Initiative identifies key genes in the brain that account for higher rates of some brain disorders in Black Americans

NIH awards Coast-to-Coast Consortium $5.6 million for All of Us Research Program

Ben-Gurion University scientist hunts for drug candidate to treat brain tumors

New Health Blueprint maps healthier future for rural, underserved Southwest Virginia

Survival benefit associated with participation in clinical trials of anticancer drugs

Expanding on the fundamental principles of liquid movement

Chemical Insights Research Institute partners with Duke University and the East-West Center to examine dust and ash from devastating Hawai’ian wildfires

NCCN publishes new resource for patients with intestinal cancer type most have never heard of before diagnosis

Subduction zone splay faults compound hazards of great earthquakes

Record low Antarctic sea ice ‘extremely unlikely’ without climate change

After hundreds of years, study confirms Bermuda now home to cownose rays

Scientists uncover promising treatment target for resistant brain cancer

Revolutionizing cancer treatment by intracellular protein delivery using hybrid nanotubes

Chemist Julian West makes C&EN magazine’s ‘Talented 12’ list

Robot-phobia could exasperate hotel, restaurant labor shortage

Study offers new detail on how COVID-19 affects the lungs

Body’s ‘message in a bottle’ delivers targeted cancer treatment

1 in 4 parents say their teen consumes caffeine daily or nearly every day

What makes some brown algae shimmer and others not?

[Press-News.org] Cannabis use disorder and subsequent risk of psychotic and nonpsychotic unipolar depression and bipolar disorder
JAMA Psychiatry