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U.S. teens who are food insecure are more likely to engage in emotional eating and consume sugar-sweetened beverages and junk foods

U.S. teens who are food insecure are more likely to engage in emotional eating and consume sugar-sweetened beverages and junk foods
2023-05-24
(Press-News.org) Article URL:  https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0285446

Article Title: Psychosocial correlates in patterns of adolescent emotional eating and dietary consumption

Author Countries: USA

Funding: The authors received no specific funding for this work.

END

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U.S. teens who are food insecure are more likely to engage in emotional eating and consume sugar-sweetened beverages and junk foods U.S. teens who are food insecure are more likely to engage in emotional eating and consume sugar-sweetened beverages and junk foods 2 U.S. teens who are food insecure are more likely to engage in emotional eating and consume sugar-sweetened beverages and junk foods 3

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[Press-News.org] U.S. teens who are food insecure are more likely to engage in emotional eating and consume sugar-sweetened beverages and junk foods