PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Winners of Applied Microbiology International Horizon Awards are announced

2023-11-16
(Press-News.org) The winners of the Applied Microbiology International Horizon Awards were announced at the prestigious Environmental Microbiology lecture 2023, held at BMA House in London on November 16.

The prizes, awarded by Applied Microbiology International, celebrate the brightest minds in the field and promote the research, group, projects, products and individuals who continue to help shape the future of applied microbiology.

Dr Christopher Stewart of Newcastle University in the UK was named as this year’s winner of the WH Pierce Prize, which is presented to a scientist who has used microbiology to make a significant contribution to One Health advancements.

The primary goal of his research programme is to define how breastmilk bioactive components and the gut microbiome contribute to short- and long-term health in preterm infants. 

Ocean biodiversity The Rachel Carson Prize has been awarded to Dr Raquel Peixoto of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia. It recognises a scientist who has used microbiology to help further our understanding of ocean biodiversity or directly in solutions that conserve and sustainably use marine resources for sustainable development. 

Dr Peixoto’s pioneering research focuses on microbiome restoration and rehabilitation of coral reefs through the use of probiotics, generating the baseline data to allow the creation of the only sustainable medicine currently being considered to protect and restore the habitat.

Dr Ben Swift of the Royal Veterinary College in the UK was named as this year’s winner of the Basil Jarvis Prize, which goes to a microbiologist who has made a significant contribution to the expansive field of food safety, food fermentations and food security.

A microbiologist whose research has been focussed on the development of improved diagnostic tests for mycobacterial infections in animals and humans, Dr Swift was part of a team that has invented and commercialised a bacteriophage-based technology to rapidly detect slow growing mycobacteria responsible for diseases such as Bovine TB and Johne’s disease that cause economic and social hardship to farmers worldwide. 

Clean water Dr Thomas Thompson of Queen’s University Belfast in Northern Ireland has been named as winner of the inaugural John Snow Prize, which is awarded to a scientist who has made a significant contribution to the expansive field of clean water and sanitation, such as the management of surface and groundwater contamination or human exposure to pathogens.

His work focuses on the potential of using cold plasma to improve water quality, both chemically and biologically.

The inaugural Christiana Figueres Prize has been awarded to Dr Taniya RoyChowdhury of Woodwell Climate Research Center in the US. This award recognises a scientist who has used microbiology to help further our understanding of climate change or directly in solutions that can lower greenhouse gas emissions or turn renewable resources into low-carbon and low-cost electricity, fuels, chemicals or materials. 

Her work uses a multi-dimensional approach and comprehensive understanding of diverse ecosystems to provide valuable insights into the factors influencing climate vulnerability, soil health and sustainability.

Global ecosystem Distinguished Professor Brajesh Singh of Western Sydney University was named as this year’s winner of the Dorothy Jones Prize, which is awarded to a scientist who has used microbiology to make a significant contribution to our understanding of terrestrial life, rhizospheres and soil microbiomes, or to the preservation of our global ecosystem.

A global expert in the field of microbial functional ecology at Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, he spent ten years honing his knowledge in Scotland before relocating to Australia and joining the Institute, becoming Director of the Global Centre for Land-Based Innovation in 2015.

To find out more about AMI’s Grants and Awards programme, visit https://appliedmicrobiology.org/membership-community/grants-awards.html.

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Highlights from the journal CHEST®, November 2023

Highlights from the journal CHEST®, November 2023
2023-11-16
Glenview, Illinois – Published monthly, the journal CHEST® features peer-reviewed, cutting-edge original research in chest medicine: Pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine and related disciplines. Journal topics include asthma, chest infections, COPD, critical care, diffuse lung disease, education and clinical practice, pulmonary vascular disease, sleep, thoracic oncology and the humanities. The November issue of the  CHEST  journal contains 48 articles, including clinically relevant research, reviews, case series, commentary and more. Each month, the journal also offers complementary resources, including visual ...

Three-pronged approach discerns qualities of quantum spin liquids

Three-pronged approach discerns qualities of quantum spin liquids
2023-11-16
In 1973, physicist Phil Anderson hypothesized that the quantum spin liquid, or QSL, state existed on some triangular lattices, but he lacked the tools to delve deeper. Fifty years later, a team led by researchers associated with the Quantum Science Center headquartered at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has confirmed the presence of QSL behavior in a new material with this structure, KYbSe2.   QSLs — an unusual state of matter controlled by interactions among entangled, or intrinsically linked, magnetic atoms called spins — excel at stabilizing quantum mechanical activity in KYbSe2 and other delafossites. These materials are prized for ...

Cancer therapy shows promise against tuberculosis

Cancer therapy shows promise against tuberculosis
2023-11-16
A promising new cancer therapy also appears extremely potent against one of the world’s most devastating infectious diseases: tuberculosis (TB). Scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) found the therapy dramatically reduces TB growth, even for bacteria that are drug-resistant. The findings, reported in the journal Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, were made in novel cellular models featuring TB-infected human cells that can help accelerate screening of potential TB drugs and therapies like this one. The therapy evaluated in this study combines two ...

Theoretical computer scientists awarded the John von Neumann Theory Prize

Theoretical computer scientists awarded the John von Neumann Theory Prize
2023-11-16
Computer Science Professors Christos Papadimitriou and Mihalis Yannakakis received the John von Neumann Theory Prize for their research in computational complexity theory that explores the boundaries of efficiently solving decision and optimization problems crucial to operations research and management sciences. The recipients were presented with the prize at the 2023 INFORMS Annual Meeting in October in Phoenix, AZ. The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) first awarded the prize in 1975 to honor a body of work that has proven its lasting value in operations research and management sciences. ...

Heat tolerant coral may trade fast growth for resilience

Heat tolerant coral may trade fast growth for resilience
2023-11-16
Algae living within the soft tissue of coral supply much of the energy needed by their hosts, and some symbiotic algae help coral withstand warmer water better than others. In a recently published study led by the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, researchers found that there was a tradeoff for corals dominated by the thermally sensitive algae—they have higher growth, but only in cooler water.  “As the ocean continues to warm, understanding how symbionts and environmental factors affect coral growth and health will help predict reef futures and inform conservation interventions where coral stocks are selected ...

Genomic tug of war could boost cancer therapy

2023-11-16
Some patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, like acute myeloid leukemia, benefit from a chemotherapy drug called decitabine that stunts cancer growth. But many others are resistant to decatibine’s effects or become resistant over time. Wilmot Cancer Institute researchers have uncovered a “genomic tug of war” in animal studies that could influence how well certain patients—or certain cancers—respond to decitabine. In a study published in the journal Development, ...

New research questions the nature and meaning of "psychic-channeling" experiences

2023-11-16
The question of disembodied consciousness or the afterlife has received much scientific scrutiny over the last several years. One line of research involves so-called "channelers" or mediums who claim to receive and communicate information that they believe comes from some other being or dimension of reality that differs from everyday reality. Now, an international team of scientists has critically examined these claims. New research published in the Journal of Scientific Exploration asked 15 pre-vetted channelers to access the same "nonphysical being or spirit" source and answer a structured set of 10 questions from the scientific team. The statistical ...

Drug manufacturers use FDA, patent strategies to keep insulin prices high

Drug manufacturers use FDA, patent strategies to keep insulin prices high
2023-11-16
Over the last four decades, insulin manufacturers have extended their periods of market exclusivity on brand-name insulin products by employing several strategies, including filing additional patents on their products after FDA approval and obtaining many patents on delivery devices for their insulin products. That is the conclusion of a new analysis of FDA and patent records carried out by William Feldman of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, USA, and colleagues, and published November 16th in the open access journal PLOS Medicine. Insulin is the primary, life-saving treatment for type 1 and some type 2 diabetes but remains costly in the US even ...

Growing income inequities in the utilization of healthcare resources, Swedish study finds

Growing income inequities in the utilization of healthcare resources, Swedish study finds
2023-11-16
Swedish people with the lowest incomes utilize primary and outpatient care on par with those with the highest incomes despite having significantly higher mortality rates, according to a new study published November 16th in the open access journal PLOS Medicine by Pär Flodin of Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, and colleagues. Socioeconomic differences in healthcare utilization have persisted in modern welfare states even with universal healthcare. In recent decades, Sweden has witnessed a rise in income inequalities, accompanied by shifts in the sociodemographic composition of the population ...

Love thy neighbor: Cooperation extends beyond one’s own group in wild bonobos

Love thy neighbor: Cooperation extends beyond one’s own group in wild bonobos
2023-11-16
A new study published this week in Science challenges the notion that only humans are capable of forming strong and strategic cooperative relationships and sharing resources across non-family groups. Researchers from Harvard University and the German Primate Center examined the pro-social behavior of bonobos (Pan paniscus), one of humanity’s closest living relatives, finding that their cooperation extends beyond one’s own group to societal cooperation with different groups. Studying humans' two closest living relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, can help reconstruct ancestral human traits like cooperation and conflict. Despite living in similar ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

12.5, the 1st Impact Factor of COMMTR released!

Circadian clock impact on cluster headaches funded by $2.4M NIH grant for UTHealth Houston research

Study identifies first drug therapy for sleep apnea

How old is your bone marrow?

Boosting biodiversity without hurting local economies

ChatGPT is biased against resumes with credentials that imply a disability — but it can improve

Simple test for flu could improve diagnosis and surveillance

UT Health San Antonio researcher awarded five-year, $2.53 million NIH grant to study alcohol-assisted liver disease

Giving pre-med students hands-on clinical training

CAMH research suggests potential targets for prevention and early identification of psychotic disorders

Mapping the heart to prevent damage caused by a heart attack

Study challenges popular idea that Easter islanders committed ‘ecocide’

Chilling discovery: Study reveals evolution of human cold and menthol sensing protein, offering hope for future non-addictive pain therapies.

Elena Beccalli, new rector of Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, takes office on 1st July

Pacific Northwest Research Institute uncovers hidden DNA mechanisms of rare genetic diseases

Empowering older adults: Wearable tech made easier with personalized support

Pennington Biomedical researchers partner on award-winning Long Covid study

Cooling ‘blood oranges’ could make them even healthier – a bonus for consumers

Body image and overall health found important to the sexual health of older gay men, according to new studies

Lab-grown muscles reveal mysteries of rare muscle diseases

Primary hepatic angiosarcoma: Treatment options for a rare tumor

Research finds causal evidence tying cerebral small-vessel disease to Alzheimer’s, dementia

Navigating the Pyrocene: Recent Cell Press papers on managing fire risk

Restoring the Great Salt Lake would have environmental justice as well as ecological benefits

Cannabis, tobacco use, and COVID-19 outcomes

A 5:2 intermittent fasting meal replacement diet and glycemic control for adults with diabetes

Scientists document self-propelling oxygen decline in the oceans

Activating molecular target reverses multiple hallmarks of aging

Cannabis use tied to increased risk of severe COVID-19

How to make ageing a ‘fairer game’ for all wormkind

[Press-News.org] Winners of Applied Microbiology International Horizon Awards are announced