PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Anti-bias police training improved performance and reduced discrimination-based complaints significantly

2023-11-20
(Press-News.org) In recent years, many police departments have mandated or encouraged anti-bias training. This has occurred in response to government-imposed measures such as consent decrees or as a proactive attempt to enhance public perceptions of police following actions that have raised concerns about racially motivated and other discriminatory practices. In a new study, researchers evaluated the effectiveness of an anti-bias training intervention in one Californian jurisdiction. The study found that officers who received the training had improved performance scores (measured by Body Worn Camera footage), decreased disparity in how they treated different groups of people, and fewer discrimination-based complaints. Results were small but significant.

The study, by researchers at Washington State University (WSU) and RTI International, is published in Policing: An International Journal.

Through anti-bias training programs, police departments seek to promote fairness in police decision making, enhance public perceptions of police, and ultimately improve interactions between police and community members. Many programs target bias, with two methods used most frequently: implicit bias training (classroom-based training with lectures on the science of bias, strategies to recognize bias, and scenarios for practicing strategies) and counter-bias training (simulation-based training in which officers respond to scenarios to facilitate their recognition of biases in behavior and practice unbiased decision making).

“Despite concerns around bias and departmental commitments to anti-bias training, there is limited evidence on the impact of the trainings on officers’ behavior and decision making in interactions with the community,” explains Lois James, Assistant Dean of Research at WSU’s College of Nursing, who led the study. James is an expert whose work is promoted by the NCJA Crime and Justice Research Alliance, which is funded by the National Criminal Justice Association.

            Between 2019 and 2021, James and her colleagues evaluated the effects of an anti-bias intervention that combined implicit and counter-bias training on two distinct outcomes: officers’ performance as measured by coded body worn camera (BWC) footage of encounters with community members and discrimination-based citizen complaints issued against the police.

Fifty patrol officers from the Sacramento Police Department were randomly selected to participate in the anti-bias intervention. Before and after the intervention, researchers coded a random selection of BWC videos from the intervention group and from a control group of officers who did not take part in the training to assess police performance in interactions with the public. They also collected discrimination-based complaints by community members before and after the intervention for both groups.

            Officers who participated in the anti-bias training had a small but significant increase (approximately 5%) in performance scores compared to officers who did not take part in the training. In addition, officers who were trained had a reduction (approximately 50%) in discrimination-based complaints compared to officers who were not trained.

The improvements in officers’ performance scores appeared to be driven by reductions in disparities in how officers treated community members who were suffering homelessness. The study did not find disparities in how officers interacted with community members based on race, but disparities were observed for gender, with officers receiving lower performance scores in interactions with men than with women.

            “Although our results are from a single municipal police department, ours is the first study to suggest that anti-bias training could have a positive behavioral impact on officers’ behaviors during interactions with the public and on public perceptions of biased treatment by officers,” notes Stephen James, Assistant Professor in WSU’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine, who coauthored the study. “As such, this is a tentatively encouraging step forward in demonstrating the effectiveness of anti-bias training.”

“However, our findings should be interpreted with caution and do not necessarily mean that anti-bias training will be successful in improving police interactions with the public,” adds Renée Jean Mitchell, who was a senior research scientist at RTI when she coauthored the study. “Other factors could contribute to these findings and so we encourage more research on this important issue.”

            Moreover, the authors caution that the combined effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the civil unrest of 2020 might have influenced results in ways that are difficult to account for, even with a no-training control group. The way police in the jurisdiction studied dealt with these factors might have differed from how other departments dealt with them, so the findings might not generalize to other jurisdictions.

The study was funded by the National Institute of Justice.

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Analysis of cyberstalking research identifies factors associated with perpetration, victimization

2023-11-20
The widespread use of digital technologies and the Internet has spurred a new type of personal intrusion, known as cyberstalking. Incidences of cyberstalking have risen, with the U.S. Department of Justice estimating that more than 1.3 million people experience this type of victimization annually. A new study explored research to identify the factors associated with perpetration and victimization in cyberstalking. The study’s findings can inform the development of efforts to prevent and address cyberstalking. Conducted by a researcher at Sam Houston State ...

Massive 2022 eruption reduced ozone levels

2023-11-20
When the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano erupted on January 15, 2022 in the South Pacific, it produced a shock wave felt around the world and triggered tsunamis in Tonga, Fiji, New Zealand, Japan, Chile, Peru and the United States. It also changed the chemistry and dynamics of the stratosphere in the year following the eruption, leading to unprecedented losses in the ozone layer of up to 7% over large areas of the Southern Hemisphere, according to a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National ...

Remarkably detailed view of “teenage galaxies” from just 2 to 3 billion years after the Big Bang revealed by JWST

Remarkably detailed view of “teenage galaxies” from just 2 to 3 billion years after the Big Bang revealed by JWST
2023-11-20
Pasadena, CA—Galaxies that formed just 2 to 3 billion years after the Big Bang are unusually hot and glow with light from surprising elements, like nickel, according to new work led by Carnegie’s Gwen Rudie and Northwestern University’s Allison Strom. Studying “teenage galaxies” from the ancient universe can teach scientists about how these massive systems of stars mature and evolve. Their findings, published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters, are part of the CECILIA (Chemical Evolution Constrained using Ionized Lines in Interstellar Aurorae) ...

Litigating the Pandemic

2023-11-20
When the COVID-19 pandemic spread across the United States, healthcare workers faced new demands, childcare and grocery store workers became essential workers, businesses shut down, and churches and school doors closed. The pandemic also arrived amidst protests over police violence. Deep partisan divisions and record natural disasters amplified these challenges. The national government offered new funding for businesses and individuals and public health guidance, and local governments issued guidelines for gathering in public.  Litigating the Pandemic (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2023), a new book by Susan Sterett, professor ...

Personalized cancer medicine: humans make better treatment decisions than AI

Personalized cancer medicine: humans make better treatment decisions than AI
2023-11-20
Treating cancer is becoming increasingly complex, but also offers more and more possibilities. After all, the better a tumor’s biology and genetic features are understood, the more treatment approaches there are. To be able to offer patients personalized therapies tailored to their disease, laborious and time-consuming analysis and interpretation of various data is required. Researchers at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin have now studied whether generative artificial intelligence ...

Genomic study links cannabis abuse to multiple health problems

2023-11-20
New Haven, Conn. — A Yale-led analysis of the genomes of more than 1 million people has shed light on the underlying biology of cannabis use disorder and its links to psychiatric disorders, abuse of other substances such as tobacco, and possibly even an elevated risk of developing lung cancer. For the study, researchers examined a genome-wide set of genetic variants in individuals from multiple ancestry groups enrolled in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ Million Veteran Program, one of the world’s largest genetic databases, and ...

Younger people are more vulnerable to the effects of cardiovascular risk associated with high blood cholesterol and hypertension

Younger people are more vulnerable to the effects of cardiovascular risk associated with high blood cholesterol and hypertension
2023-11-20
Young people may be more susceptible to the effects of the risk factors for developing atherosclerosis. According to a study carried out at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), younger people are especially vulnerable to the damaging effects of elevated blood cholesterol and hypertension, two of the major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. These findings, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, underline the need to implement aggressive control of cardiovascular risk factors at younger ages, requiring a change in primary prevention strategies to include “surveillance of subclinical atherosclerosis ...

Creativity in the age of generative AI: a new era of creative partnerships

2023-11-20
Recent advancements in generative artificial intelligence (AI) have showcased its potential in a wide range of creative activities such as to produce works of art, compose symphonies, and even draft legal texts, slide presentations or the like. These developments have raised concerns that AI will outperform humans in creativity tasks and make knowledge workers redundant. These comments are most recently underlined by a Fortune article entitled ‘Elon Musk says AI will create a future where ‘no job is needed’: ‘The AI will be able to do everything’. In ...

Ambegaonkar studying physical & mental workload & recovery in collegiate dancers

2023-11-20
Ambegaonkar Studying Physical & Mental Workload & Recovery In Collegiate Dancers  Jatin Ambegaonkar, Professor, School of Kinesiology, received funding for the project: "Physical and mental workload and recovery in collegiate dancers."  He and his collaborators, Kelley Wiese (PhD Student, CEHD – Kinesiology concentration) and Dr. Jena Hansen-Honeycutt (School of Dance, CVPA) aim to comprehensively assess the workload in collegiate dancers over the academic year.   Specifically, they are examining objective physical activity demands ...

Big-data study explores social factors affecting child health

2023-11-20
A team led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine has used an AI-based approach to uncover underlying patterns among the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age, termed social determinants of health (SDoH), and then linked each pattern to children’s health outcomes. Compared with traditional approaches, the strategy, in principle, provides a more objective and comprehensive picture of potential social factors that affect child health, which in turn, can enable better targeted interventions. As reported Oct. 16 in JAMA Pediatrics, the researchers analyzed data on more than 10,500 American children, in communities across 17 U.S. ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Bioinformatics approach could help optimize soldiers’ training for improved readiness and recovery

Earth scientists describe a new kind of volcanic eruption

Warmer wetter climate predicted to bring societal and ecological impact to the Tibetan Plateau

Feeding infants peanut products protects against allergy into adolescence

Who will like beetle skewers? What Europeans think about alternative protein food

ETRI wins ‘iF Design Award’ for mobile collaborative robot

Combating carbon footprint: novel reactor system converts carbon dioxide into usable fuel

Investigating the origin of circatidal rhythms in freshwater snails

Altering cellular interactions around amyloid plaques may offer novel Alzheimer’s treatment strategies

Brain damage reveals part of the brain necessary for helping others

Surprising properties of elastic turbulence discovered

Study assesses cancer-related care at US hospitals predominantly serving minority populations compared with non-minority serving hospitals

First in-human investigator-initiated clinical trial to launch for refractory prostate cancer patients: Novel alpha therapy targets prostate-specific membrane antigen

Will generative AI change the way universities communicate?

Artificial Intelligence could help cure loneliness, says expert

Echidnapus identified from an ‘Age of Monotremes’

Semaglutide may protect kidney function in individuals with overweight or obesity and cardiovascular disease

New technique detects novel biomarkers for kidney diseases with nephrotic syndrome

Political elites take advantage of anti-partisan protests to disrupt politics

Tiny target discovered on RNA to short-circuit inflammation, UC Santa Cruz researchers find

Charge your laptop in a minute? Supercapacitors can help; new research offers clues

Scientists discover CO2 and CO ices in outskirts of solar system

Theory and experiment combine to shine a new light on proton spin

PKMYT1, a potential ‘Achilles heel’ of treatment resistant ER+ breast cancers with the poorest prognosis

PH-binding motifs as a platform for drug design: Lessons from protease-activated receptors (PARs)

Virginia Tech researcher creates new tool to move tiny bioparticles

On repeat: Biologists observe recurring evolutionary changes, over time, in stick insects

Understanding a broken heart

Genetic cause of rare childhood immune disorders discovered

With wobbling stars, astronomers gauge mass of 126 exoplanets and find 15 new ones

[Press-News.org] Anti-bias police training improved performance and reduced discrimination-based complaints significantly