PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

New method is better able to map immune response and paves way for new treatments

2023-12-07
(Press-News.org) A new method, developed at Karolinska Institutet, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and SciLifeLab in Sweden, can identify unique immune cell receptors and their location in tissue, a study published in the journal Science reports. The researchers predict that the method will improve the ability to identify which immune cells contribute to disease processes and open up opportunities to develop novel therapies for numerous diseases.

Immune cells such as T and B cells are central to the body’s defence against both infections and tumours. Both types of immune cells express unique receptors that specifically recognise different parts of unwanted and foreign elements, such as bacteria, viruses and tumours. Each immune cell and its progeny has its own specific receptors, and in each human body there are billions of different immune cells with unique receptors.

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and SciLifeLab have now developed a method that is able to both identify the different B and T cell receptors and reveal their location in human tissue.

Many areas of application

“Since activated immune cells are often found close to the targets that they attack, we want to be able to map the cells that are indeed closest to a tumour or infection,” says Camilla Engblom, assistant professor at the Department of Medicine (Solna), Karolinska Institutet and one of the study’s three lead authors along with Kim Thrane, KTH/SciLifeLab, and Qirong Lin, Karolinska Institutet. “It hasn’t been possible to identify both B och T cell receptors in their microenvironments using previous methods.”

According to Dr Engblom, there is a wide range of areas in which the new technique can be put to clinical use in the future.

“In cancer, the method can identify T cells that potentially attack the tumour,” she says. “They could then be used as cell therapy against cancer. We can also identify unique receptors on the B cells that are released as antibodies in specific areas of the tumour. These antibodies can be produced in the lab with relative ease and eventually give rise to novel therapies. Another field is autoimmune diseases, where the immune system attacks healthy tissue. The new technique could be used to identify the immune cells that do this and increase the chances of finding exactly what it is they attack.”

An important step forward

Jeff Mold, one of the principal investigators of the study and researcher at the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology at Karolinska Institutet, sees the new method as an important step forward.

“Identifying these unique immune receptors is like trying to find a needle in a haystack, especially when it comes to autoimmune diseases,” he says. “With most current methods, you destroy the tissue, which means not only that you get different immune cells mixed up, but also that some cells die in the process. With this method, we preserve the cells where they are and we can see cells that would otherwise have been lost.”

Dr Mold believes that the ability to identify B cells is arguably the main benefit of this new method.

“T cells have been a popular research target, while the B cells have been a little overlooked, especially in cancer,” he says. “But now we can track how B cells develop and expand direct in tissue.”

The study was financed by the Swedish Research Council, the Swedish Cancer Society and the EU research and innovation programme Horizon 2020.

Potential conflicts of interest: Camilla Engblom, Kim Thrane, Jeff Mold, Jonas Frisén, Joakim Lundeberg and Qirong Lin are inventors of a patent that covers this work. Camilla Engblom, Kim Thrane, Qirong Lin, Alma Andersson, Hosein Toosi, Sami Saarenpää, Jeff Mold, Joakim Lundeberg and Jonas Frisén are scientific consultants for 10x Genomics, which holds intellectual property rights to this technology. Jeff Mold holds shares in Pacific Biosciences.

Facts: Spatial transcriptomics of immune cells

The method of spatial transcriptomics was developed in 2016 by professors Jonas Frisén at Karolinska Institutet and Joakim Lundeberg at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, who are co-authors of this study. It was named “Method of the Year 2020” by the journal Nature Methods.

The new method is an upgrade of the original method that now makes it possible for researchers to map the immune cells’ receptors and their exact location in tissue, which was previously not possible to do for B and T cells at the same time.

Source: Camilla Engblom and Jeff Mold.

Publication: “Spatial transcriptomics of B cell and T cell receptors reveals lymphocyte clonal dynamics”, Camilla Engblom, Kim Thrane, Qirong Lin, Alma Andersson, Hosein Toosi, Xinsong Chen, Embla Steiner, Chang Lu, Giulia Mantovani, Michael Hagemann-Jensen, Sami Saarenpää, Mattias Jangard, Julio Saez-Rodriguez, Jakob Michaëlsson, Johan Hartman, Jens Lagergren, Jeff Mold, Joakim Lundeberg, Jonas Frisén. Science, online 7 December 2023, doi: 10.1126/science.adf8486.

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Researchers reveal uncharted liver-focused pathway in gene therapy immune responses

2023-12-07
INDIANAPOLIS— Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have uncovered vital insights regarding a liver trigger that blocks an undesired immune response from gene therapy, surprisingly resulting in the activation of specific immune cells, despite the liver's typical role in suppressing immune responses. The findings, published in Molecular Therapy, may pave the way for change in immunomodulation strategies for desired and long-lasting effects of gene therapy. Gene therapy treatments involve replacing or introducing a healthy copy of ...

Virtualware and Kessler Foundation renew collaboration in groundbreaking spatial neglect research

Virtualware and Kessler Foundation renew collaboration in groundbreaking spatial neglect research
2023-12-07
East Hanover, NJ – December 07, 2023 – Kessler Foundation, a leader in rehabilitation research, and Virtualware, an international leader in immersive and interactive technologies, expand their collaboration with a new agreement to further research and development aimed at advancing spatial neglect rehabilitation using virtual reality (VR) and tele-rehabilitation technology. This latest development stems from a strong, ongoing partnership initiated in 2018 between the VR innovator and the New Jersey-based disability-focused non-profit. The intervention, ...

New HS curriculum teaches color chemistry and AI simultaneously

2023-12-07
North Carolina State University researchers have developed a weeklong high school curriculum that helps students quickly grasp concepts in both color chemistry and artificial intelligence – while sparking their curiosity about science and the world around them. To test whether a short high school science module could effectively teach students something about both chemistry – a notoriously thorny subject – and artificial intelligence (AI), the researchers designed a relatively simple experiment involving pH levels, which reflect the acidity or alkalinity of a liquid solution.  When testing pH levels on a test strip, color conversion charts provide a handy ...

Bering secures FDA clearance for AI-based chest X-ray triage solution

2023-12-07
LONDON, DECEMBER 6, 2023 – Bering Limited, a London-based medical AI company, today announced it received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for its AI-powered chest X-Ray triage solution, ‘BraveCX’. With the FDA clearance, the company is now able to commercially provide the AI solution to medical professionals and healthcare institutions in the U.S. Bering’s BraveCX is a radiological computer-assisted triage and notification software that analyzes adult (≥18 years old) chest X-ray (CXR) images for the presence of ...

Molecular fossils shed light on ancient life

2023-12-07
Paleontologists are getting a glimpse at life over a billion years in the past based on chemical traces in ancient rocks and the genetics of living animals. Research published Dec. 1 in Nature Communications combines geology and genetics, showing how changes in the early Earth prompted a shift in how animals eat. David Gold, associate professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of California, Davis, works in the new field of molecular paleontology, using the tools of both geology and biology to study the evolution ...

Honeyguide birds learn distinct signals made by honey hunters from different cultures

2023-12-07
African honeyguide birds understand and respond to the culturally distinct signals made by local human honey hunters, suggesting cultural coevolution between species, according to a new study. Although the animal kingdom is full of interspecific mutualism, systems in which humans successfully cooperate with wild animals are rare. One such relationship involves the greater honeyguide (Indicator indicator), a small African bird known to lead humans to wild bees’ nests. Humans open the nests to collect honey, and the honeyguides eat the exposed beeswax. Human honey hunters in different parts of Africa often use ...

Two studies demonstrate on-demand quantum entanglement in ultracold molecules

2023-12-07
The controlled creation of quantum entanglement with molecules has been a long-standing challenge in quantum science. Now, in two new studies, researchers report a method for tailoring the quantum states of individual molecules to achieve quantum entanglement on demand. Their strategy presents a promising new platform for the advancement of quantum technologies such as computation and sensing. Quantum entanglement is one of the key defining features of quantum mechanics. It is central to many quantum applications. Because of their rich internal structure ...

Trees in wetter forests more sensitive to drought than trees in drier regions – a finding with policy implications

2023-12-07
Annual tree-ring growth records from more than 122 species of trees show that trees growing in wetter forests are more sensitive to increasing drought. The findings – which tackle a research question that has yielded contradictory results in the past – suggest that land management and policy focused solely on drought effects in drier regions overestimates the resilience of forests in wetter regions. Forests cover roughly 30% of Earth’s surface and, in addition to providing a host of valuable ecosystem services and harboring huge biodiversity, they play a crucial role in the planet’s carbon cycle, absorbing more atmospheric carbon than all other terrestrial ...

A new 66 million-year history of carbon dioxide offers little comfort for today

A new 66 million-year history of carbon dioxide offers little comfort for today
2023-12-07
A massive new review of ancient atmospheric carbon-dioxide levels and corresponding temperatures lays out a daunting picture of where the Earth’s climate may be headed. The study covers geologic records spanning the past 66 million years, putting present-day concentrations into context with deep time. Among other things, it indicates that the last time atmospheric carbon dioxide consistently reached today’s human-driven levels was 14 million years ago—much longer ago than some existing assessments indicate. It asserts that long-term climate is highly sensitive to greenhouse gas, with cascading effects that may evolve over many millennia. The ...

Grunt or whistle: successful honey-hunters know how to communicate with wild honey-seeking birds

Grunt or whistle: successful honey-hunters know how to communicate with wild honey-seeking birds
2023-12-07
In many parts of Africa, humans cooperate with a species of wax-eating bird called the greater honeyguide, Indicator indicator, which leads them to wild bees’ nests with a chattering call. By using specialised sounds to communicate with each other, both species can significantly increase their chances of accessing calorie-dense honey and beeswax. Human honey-hunters in different parts of Africa use different calls to communicate with honeyguides. In a new study, researchers have discovered that honeyguide birds in Tanzania and Mozambique discriminate among honey-hunters’ calls, responding much more readily to ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Heart failure in space: scientists calculate potential health threats facing future space tourists in microgravity

Experts offer guidance on talking with children about racism at pediatrician's office

Drugs for HIV and AIDS trialed as brain tumor treatment for first time

Breakthrough in nanoscale force measurement opens doors to unprecedented biological insights

Scientists discover new behavior of membranes that could lead to unprecedented separations

When inflicting pain on others pays off T

The Lancet: Managing gestational diabetes much earlier in pregnancy can prevent complications and improve long-term health outcomes, experts say

New study finds dinosaur fossils did not inspire the mythological griffin

NASA astronaut Woody Hoburg to deliver keynote address at ISSRDC focused on developing a space workforce

Study: Fatigue-management training improved sleep, safety, well-being for Seattle police

Guiding humanity beyond the moon: OHIO’s Nate Szewczyk and students coauthor papers published in “Nature” journals that revolutionize human space biology

Grant supports research to identify barriers to health care for Black women

Scientists at uOttawa develop innovative method to validate quantum photonics circuits performance

New report on community-centered approach to providing vaccine education and resources to persons experiencing homelessness during COVID-19

Government updates race and ethnicity data collection standards: implications and insights

Dr. Vivek S. Kavadi named CEO of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

Dietary sucrose determines activity of lithium on gene expression and lifespan in drosophila melanogaster

Assessment of CEA, CA-125, and CA19-9 as adjuncts in non-small cell lung cancer management

Iron meteorites hint that our infant solar system was more doughnut than dartboard

Anti-trust regulators should consider their options carefully when start-ups are acquired, new study suggests

Family conditions may have more of an impact on upward social mobility than gender inequality

People with higher weight, and those who have high-quality experiences with higher-weight people, report less weight bias, per social psychology study of US adults

In two separate clinical studies, combined immunotherapy approach enhances cancer patient response

Airborne mapping reveals roles for biogenic sources and temperature in air pollution emissions in Los Angeles

Old bombs reveal new insights: Plants store more carbon, but for a shorter time frame, than we thought

The time it takes a person to decide can predict their preference

Hurricane changed ‘rules of the game’ in monkey society

Researchers widely observe yet seldom publish about same-sex sexual behavior in primates and other mammals - often because it is perceived to be rare

Wild chimpanzees seek out medicinal plants to treat illness and injuries

New catalyst unveils the hidden power of water for green hydrogen generation

[Press-News.org] New method is better able to map immune response and paves way for new treatments