PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Report finds significant gender and racial inequities in the educational measurement profession

2024-04-12
(Press-News.org) Washington, April 12, 2024—Gender and racially based employment disparities, differences in perceptions of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI), and workplace discrimination remain significant issues in the field of educational measurement, according to a new report supported by the American Educational Research Association (AERA), the National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME), and Women in Measurement (WIM). Educational measurement professionals who work at universities, thinktanks, and other research organizations are on the cutting-edge of designing methods and techniques used to measure learning and other educational outcomes.

The report was authored by Thao Vo (Washington State University), Susan Lyons (WIM), Felice J. Levine (AERA), Nathan E. Bell (AERA), and Ye Tong (NBME). Among the major findings of the study of 1,312 individuals who are members of AERA’s Division D—Measurement and Research Methodologies, NCME, and WIM:

There are significant differences in salary and professional rank across gender and racial groups, with White men reporting higher salary ranges and occupying more senior positions compared to their counterparts from other gender and racial groups. Professionals from different gender and racial groups are experiencing DEI issues differently, with women of color consistently reporting the lowest perception of organizational DEI effectiveness. Nearly 13 percent of respondents reported experiencing discrimination within the last 12 months that hindered their professional growth, with women of color being the most affected group. The overwhelming majority of these instances were reportedly unaddressed.   “With an increasingly diverse student population, it is important the field of educational measurement is attuned to and reflects that diversity,” said AERA Executive Director Felice J. Levine. “Creating a more just and equitable profession will ensure that what is being measured and how it is being measured fully captures the full range of experiences across groups of students.”

“This important work shines a spotlight on the community of professionals working in educational measurement and the employers who recruit and develop them and benefit from their work,” said NCME President Michael Walker. “Employers and organizations need to take significant steps toward creating more equitable and inclusive workplaces.”

Susan Lyons, co-founder and executive director of Women in Measurement, highlighted the need to take action: “Our findings serve as a call of action for ongoing commitment and tangible change, emphasizing the importance of understanding and addressing the unique challenges faced by underrepresented groups in educational measurement. We urge employers to take proactive steps to further support and advance DEI and antidiscrimination efforts in the educational measurement profession.”

The report provides five actionable recommendations for employers across all institutional and organizational settings to enhance DEI in the workplace.

Employers should publicly evaluate, acknowledge, and commit to a plan for increasing diversity representation. Employers should conduct thorough pay equity audits and make necessary corrections so employers can ensure that their employees are compensated fairly regardless of gender, race, or ethnicity. Employers should invest in antibias and antidiscrimination training to foster a work culture where employees understand their conscious, subconscious, and unconscious biases. Employers should focus on transparently communicating how policies are evaluated and enacted, including providing employees with a clear understanding of the decision-making process and the rationale behind policy changes. To effectively gauge the impact of DEI policies and initiatives, employers should invest in gathering regular feedback from employees. About AERA
The American Educational Research Association (AERA) is the largest national interdisciplinary research association devoted to the scientific study of education and learning. Founded in 1916, AERA advances knowledge about education, encourages scholarly inquiry related to education, and promotes the use of research to improve education and serve the public good.

About NCME
The National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME) is a professional organization for individuals involved in assessment, evaluation, testing, and other aspects of educational measurement. Members are involved in the construction and use of standardized tests; new forms of assessment, including performance-based assessment; program design; and program evaluation.

About WIM
Women in Measurement (WIM) is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing gender and racial equity in educational measurement leadership. Women in Measurement amplifies the diverse voices of all women and provide structures of support for career advancement through its programs and events. Its services include mentoring, networking, and sponsored research programs.

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

University of Houston and Scotland’s Heriot-Watt University forge strategic energy alliance

University of Houston and Scotland’s Heriot-Watt University forge strategic energy alliance
2024-04-12
HOUSTON, April 10, 2024 - The University of Houston (UH) and Scotland’s Heriot-Watt University (HWU) signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) today, marking the beginning of their partnership to foster global collaboration in education, research and innovation in the energy sector and beyond. At the heart of the MoU lies a commitment to advance research that helps society deliver a just energy transition, with a particular emphasis on hydrogen – a critical element in the transition to sustainable energy ...

Rice team demonstrates miniature brain stimulator in humans

Rice team demonstrates miniature brain stimulator in humans
2024-04-12
HOUSTON – (April 12, 2024) – Rice University engineers have developed the smallest implantable brain stimulator demonstrated in a human patient. Thanks to pioneering magnetoelectric power transfer technology, the pea-sized device developed in the Rice lab of Jacob Robinson in collaboration with Motif Neurotech and clinicians Dr. Sameer Sheth and Dr. Sunil Sheth can be powered wirelessly via an external transmitter and used to stimulate the brain through the dura ⎯ the protective ...

Jennifer Stinson receives prestigious Barer-Flood Prize in health services research

Jennifer Stinson receives prestigious Barer-Flood Prize in health services research
2024-04-12
Jennifer Stinson a renowned researcher in the field of chronic pain management in children, has received the 2023 Barer-Flood Prize from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).  The prize, named in honour of the first two Scientific Directors of CIHR-IHSPR, Drs. Morris Barer and Colleen Flood, recognizes the highest-ranking senior-career investigator who identifies as a woman, and their research excellence.  Dr. Stinson, a Professor at the Lawrence Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, and Temerty Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, is being acknowledged ...

First insights into the genetic bottleneck characterizing early sheep husbandry in the Neolithic period

First insights into the genetic bottleneck characterizing early sheep husbandry in the Neolithic period
2024-04-12
Modern Eurasian sheep predominantly belong to only two so-called genetic matrilineages inherited through the ewes. Previous research thereby assumed that genetic diversity must already have decreased rapidly in the early stages of domestication of wild sheep. Our study of a series of complete mitogenomes from the early domestication site Asıklı Höyük in central Anatolia, which was inhabited between 10,300 and 9,300 years ago, disproves this assumption: despite a millennium of human interference with the keeping and breeding of sheep, mitogenomic diversity remained invariably high, with five matrilineages ...

Theories that explain the crisis in democracy are inadequate for Latin America, experts say

Theories that explain the crisis in democracy are inadequate for Latin America, experts say
2024-04-12
The theories offered by the dominant literature in political science today to try to explain the sources of the political polarization that has endangered democracy around the world are adequate for the United States and Europe, but do not make sense for the countries of Latin America. For this reason, greater collaboration among political scientists is needed to identify other, more plausible hypotheses for the phenomenon that the region is also experiencing. The assessment was made by researchers participating in a panel discussion on democracy and social inclusion held on April 9 in Chicago (United States) during FAPESP Week Illinois https://fapesp.br/week/2024/illinois. “There’s ...

Starving cells hijack protein transport stations

Starving cells hijack protein transport stations
2024-04-12
A new study details how nutrient-starved cells divert protein transport stations to cellular recycling centers to be broken down, highlighting a novel approach cells use to deal with stressful conditions. New proteins bound for outside the cell are manufactured on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) – a snaking membrane inside the cell. Grape-like tubular outgrowths on the ER called ER exit sites serve as transport stations, collecting these newly synthesized proteins and delivering them to the next step in their journey. In recent ...

Where have all the right whales gone?

Where have all the right whales gone?
2024-04-12
DURHAM, N.C. – Marine researchers have mapped the density of one of the most endangered large whale species worldwide, the North Atlantic right whale, using newly analyzed data to predict and help avoid whales’ harmful, even fatal, exposure to commercial fishing and vessel strikes. Duke University’s Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab led a collaboration of 11 institutions in the United States that pooled 17 years of available visual survey data covering 9.7 million square kilometers of the U.S. ...

Researchers find no link between COVID-19 virus and development of asthma in children

2024-04-12
Philadelphia, April 12, 2024 – In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, many families worried about the long-term effects posed by the SARS-COV-2 virus. Now, researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) found that a SARS-COV-2 infection likely does not increase the risk of asthma development in pediatric patients. The findings were published today in the journal Pediatrics. Respiratory viral infections early in life are risk factors for asthma. Since the SARS-COV-2 virus can cause severe lung inflammation and prolonged respiratory symptoms in certain patients, many families were concerned whether COVID-19 might trigger an asthma diagnosis in their children. CHOP ...

Cell’s ‘garbage disposal’ may have another role: helping neurons near skin sense the environment

Cell’s ‘garbage disposal’ may have another role: helping neurons near skin sense the environment
2024-04-12
The typical job of the proteasome, the garbage disposal of the cell, is to grind down proteins into smaller bits and recycle some of those bits and parts. That’s still the case, for the most part, but, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, studying nerve cells grown in the lab and mice, say that the proteasome’s role may go well beyond that. Its additional role, say the researchers, may shift from trash sorter to signal messenger in dorsal root ganglion neurons — cells that convey sensory signals from nerve cells close to the skin to the central nervous system. Results of their experiments, published April 12 in Cell Reports, show that proteasomes may help those specialized ...

Study reveals potential to reverse lung fibrosis using the body’s own healing technique

2024-04-12
he most common type of lung fibrosis — scarring of the lungs -- is idiopathic, meaning of unknown cause.  Researchers are urgently trying to find ways to prevent or slow idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and related lung conditions, which can cause worsening shortness of breath, dry cough, and extreme fatigue. Average survival following diagnosis of IPF is just three to five years, and the disease has no cure. A recent U-M study from a team led by Sean Fortier, M.D. and Marc Peters-Golden, M.D. of the Division ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Scientists uncover a multibillion-year epic written into the chemistry of life

Monitoring diseases through sweat becomes accessible to everyone

Mathematical model driven evolutionary therapy dosing exploiting cancer cell plasticity

Biodiversity in the margins: Merging farmlands affects natural pest control

1 in 8 pregnant people have a disability, but significant gaps exist in the provision of accessible care

Statins associated with decreased risk for CVD and death, even in very old adults

Climate change is moving tree populations away from the soil fungi that sustain them

Secrets of sargassum: Scientists advance knowledge of seaweed causing chaos in the Caribbean and West Africa

Bioinformatics approach could help optimize soldiers’ training for improved readiness and recovery

Earth scientists describe a new kind of volcanic eruption

Warmer wetter climate predicted to bring societal and ecological impact to the Tibetan Plateau

Feeding infants peanut products protects against allergy into adolescence

Who will like beetle skewers? What Europeans think about alternative protein food

ETRI wins ‘iF Design Award’ for mobile collaborative robot

Combating carbon footprint: novel reactor system converts carbon dioxide into usable fuel

Investigating the origin of circatidal rhythms in freshwater snails

Altering cellular interactions around amyloid plaques may offer novel Alzheimer’s treatment strategies

Brain damage reveals part of the brain necessary for helping others

Surprising properties of elastic turbulence discovered

Study assesses cancer-related care at US hospitals predominantly serving minority populations compared with non-minority serving hospitals

First in-human investigator-initiated clinical trial to launch for refractory prostate cancer patients: Novel alpha therapy targets prostate-specific membrane antigen

Will generative AI change the way universities communicate?

Artificial Intelligence could help cure loneliness, says expert

Echidnapus identified from an ‘Age of Monotremes’

Semaglutide may protect kidney function in individuals with overweight or obesity and cardiovascular disease

New technique detects novel biomarkers for kidney diseases with nephrotic syndrome

Political elites take advantage of anti-partisan protests to disrupt politics

Tiny target discovered on RNA to short-circuit inflammation, UC Santa Cruz researchers find

Charge your laptop in a minute? Supercapacitors can help; new research offers clues

Scientists discover CO2 and CO ices in outskirts of solar system

[Press-News.org] Report finds significant gender and racial inequities in the educational measurement profession