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Annals supplement highlights important new evidence readers ‘may have missed’ in 2023

2024-04-15
(Press-News.org) Embargoed for release until 5:00 p.m. ET on Monday 15 April 2024    
Annals of Internal Medicine Tip Sheet     

@Annalsofim    
Below please find summaries of new articles that will be published in the next issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. The summaries are not intended to substitute for the full articles as a source of information. This information is under strict embargo and by taking it into possession, media representatives are committing to the terms of the embargo not only on their own behalf, but also on behalf of the organization they represent.    
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Annals supplement highlights important new evidence readers ‘may have missed’ in 2023

Abstract: https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M24-0832    

URL goes live when the embargo lifts      

A new supplement published in Annals of Internal Medicine highlights important new evidence published in 2023 that readers may have missed. The editors say the intent is to provide internal medicine physicians and other clinicians a brief overview of selected new evidence of relevance to those who practice outside of each of the 8 disciplines featured: cardiology, critical care, gastroenterology/hepatology, infectious diseases, nephrology, oncology, pulmonology, and rheumatology.             The objective is to highlight novelty in each subspecialty field that may impact the practice of general internal medicine where a consult with a specialist may or may not be needed.

 

“What You May Have Missed” stems from a partnership between Annals of Internal Medicine and McMaster University and is expected to become a yearly Annals feature. Articles were selected using the McMaster literature surveillance system for identifying, appraising, and summarizing potential new evidence ready for clinical implementation. The Heath Information Research Unit selected, screened, and rated all the articles included in the supplement. The team included senior McMaster University subspecialty fellows with an interest in evidence-based medicine to make the production of the series an active learning process for these early-career physicians. Finally, the team took into consideration five questions when reviewing their articles that pertain to the relevance, message, findings, and implications of new research. The editors encourage readers to reach out to Annals with suggestions to improve the supplement in future years.

 

The pilot for ‘What You May Have Missed’ was first published in 2022 out of concern that internal medicine physicians may have missed news on important developments in topics overlooked during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Media contacts: For an embargoed PDF by topic or to speak with Annals Editor in Chief Christine Laine, MD, MPH, please contact Angela Collom at acollom@acponline.org.

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[Press-News.org] Annals supplement highlights important new evidence readers ‘may have missed’ in 2023