PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Psychologists warn that therapies based on positive emotions may not work for Asians

2011-04-26
(Press-News.org) Thinking happy thoughts, focusing on the good and downplaying the bad is believed to accelerate recovery from depression, bolster resilience during a crisis and improve overall mental health. But a new study by University of Washington psychologists reveals that pursuing happiness may not be beneficial across all cultures.

In a survey of college students, Asian respondents showed no relationship between positive emotions and levels of stress and depression. For European-American participants, however, the more stress and depression they felt, the fewer positive emotions they reported.

The study indicates that psychotherapies emphasizing positive emotions, which can relieve stress and depression in white populations, may not work for Asians, who make up 60 percent of the world population.

The findings have implications for helping the Japanese recover from natural disasters and subsequent nuclear crisis in March, and for Chinese coping with post-traumatic stress following the 2008 Sichuan province earthquake.

"If we are to relieve some of the trauma from the tsunami and earthquakes, we have to be careful of imparting Western therapies," said Janxin Leu, UW assistant professor of psychology. "I worry that if a therapy which relies on positive emotions and thinking is used with Asian patients, it will not be effective and may even make patients feel worse."

Mindfulness therapies that encourage patients to pay attention to the good and the bad will likely work better, she said.

Co-authors of the paper are Jennifer Wang and Kelly Koo, both UW psychology graduate students. The journal Emotion published the study online March 28.

The researchers asked 633 college students – a mix of Asian immigrants, Asian Americans and European Americans – to rate how much stress and depression they felt and how often they've been in a sad mood, felt worthless or had sleep or appetite changes.

The participants also rated the intensity of the positive emotions that they felt, including feelings of serenity, joy, confidence and attentiveness.

For European-American participants, there was a strong correlation showing that the more positive emotions they expressed, the less depression or stress they reported. The correlation was more subtle among Asian-Americans, but for Asians, there was no correlation between positive emotions and depression and stress.

The findings show that Asians interpret and react to positive emotions differently in regards to their mental health.

Upon winning an award, for instance, the researchers said that a typical response would be "I'm so happy that I'm afraid." The award would trigger feelings of happiness for the achievement combined with concern that others would be jealous.

This blend of emotions is common among Asians, Leu said, and it may be shaped by Buddhist beliefs that happiness either leads to suffering or is impossible to obtain.

"Happiness signals that something bad will happen next; happiness is fleeting," she said. Similarly, yin-and-yang attitudes may instill views that life is a natural balance of good and bad.

For Asians with depression, therapies likely to work the best are those that encourage patients to "observe when they feel good and bad and notice that both will disappear. Everything passes," Leu said.

### The UW's Institute for Ethnic Studies in the United States funded the research.

For more information, contact Leu at 206-616-1371 or janleu@uw.edu.


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

A study analyzes the actual role of R+D's in patents

A study analyzes the actual role of R+Ds in patents
2011-04-26
This release is available in Spanish. For some time now there has been a certain degree of controversy regarding the effect of patents on the competitiveness of an economy. There are those who maintain that innovation is reduced when rights to a monopoly are given to a patent holder for a period of time, while others believe that it is the compensation necessary so that firms invest in R+D without having others take advantage of the innovations. The aim of the work of these researchers is to study the relationship between R+D and patents in a general context to be ...

Book Marketing, The 'Authors Marketing Powerhouse', Announces The Authors Show Lineup For The Week Of April 25, 2011

2011-04-26
Don McCauley of the Free Publicity Focus Group and Danielle Hampson of eBroadcastMedia.com, founders of Book Marketing, announced today The Authors Show radio and TV weekly broadcast schedule. Book Marketing, branded as 'The Authors Marketing Powerhouse', allows authors and publishers the opportunity to upload photos, bios, book covers, video and book trailers. The site also offers discussion forums, segmented special interest groups and allows for event listings. Each author can develop a personalized page. In addition the site allows for integration with Facebook and ...

Mafiz Ali's Royal Wedding Menu at Ayr Spice Indian Restaurant

2011-04-26
Celebrity TV chef Mafiz Ali is preparing a sumptuous feast at his Ayr Spice Indian Restaurant in Minishant, South Ayrshire for customers old and new to celebrate the Royal Wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton this week. It will be a banquet fit for a future King and Queen. Ayr Spice Indian Restaurant, Minishant, South Ayrshire, Scotland Royal Wedding Menu Available Friday and Saturday 29/30 April 2011 GBP24.95 including welcome drink! Choice of drink and papadoms with chutneys on arrival STARTERS Royal Mixed Platter - Mixed dishes Royal ...

Radar shows promise for detecting concussions in athletes and soldiers

Radar shows promise for detecting concussions in athletes and soldiers
2011-04-26
Walking and thinking at the same time can be especially difficult for persons who've suffered concussions, and scientists hope to use that multitasking challenge -- measured by a simple radar system -- to quickly screen individuals who may have suffered brain injuries. By asking an individual to walk a short distance while saying the months of the year in reverse order, researchers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) can determine if that person is impaired and possibly suffering from a concussion. This simple test, which could be performed on the sideline of ...

IntelliVocab 1.5 Released to Improve English Vocabulary Interactively

2011-04-26
Faqden Labs is pleased to announce IntelliVocab 1.5 (formerly PowerVocab), an application for iOS devices which personalizes the English vocabulary learning for competitive exams and personal improvement. Being designed by students of MIT, IntelliVocab 1.5 is based on the latest research from MIT Computer Science and Web Semantics Lab allowing users to master English vocabulary in the most effective way. IntelliVocab completely controls the learning environment, so that users do not have to plan the learning approach. All they need to do is interact. Powerful enough ...

New perspectives on ion selectivity

New perspectives on ion selectivity
2011-04-26
The latest Perspectives in General Physiology series examines the ion selectivity of cation-selective channels and transporters. The series appears in the May 2011 issue of the Journal of General Physiology (www.jgp.org). According to Perspectives Editor Olaf Andersen in his introduction, a key tool in most recent studies on ion selectivity has been the so-called "toy models," which emphasize the fluid-like features of the selectivity filter and allow for the isolation of key features. Although proteins may indeed be fluid-like at small-length scales, however, they show ...

Cyara Solutions Continues Expansion into EMEA to Meet Growing Demand for a Better Contact Center Experience.

2011-04-26
Cyara, a pioneer of next-generation solutions for simulating, testing and monitoring interactive voice response (IVRs) and contact center systems, today announced further expansion into Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) with the opening of a dedicated EMEA office headquartered in London. The company also announced the opening of a United Kingdom-based data center and appointed Nick Duggan as director of sales EMEA to develop and support its rapidly expanding customer base in the region which includes Vodafone, Sky and Nationwide Building Society. The Cyara Solution ...

ACC/AHA issue first clinical guidance for controlling high blood pressure in the elderly

2011-04-26
Hypertension is very common among older adults. 64 percent of older men and 78 percent of older women have high blood pressure, placing them at heightened risk for heart disease including heart failure, stroke, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation, as well as chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus. Despite its prevalence, rates of blood pressure control remain substantially lower in the elderly than in younger patients. In fact, over age 80, only one in three men and one in four women have adequate control of their blood pressure. Faced with an aging patient ...

Protein levels could signal that a child will develop diabetes

Protein levels could signal that a child will develop diabetes
2011-04-26
AUGUSTA, Ga. – Decreasing blood levels of a protein that helps control inflammation may be a red flag that could help children avoid type 1 diabetes, researchers say. Georgia Health Sciences University researchers are looking at blood levels of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, or IL-1ra, in children being closely followed because their genes put them at risk for type 1 diabetes. They also are looking at diabetic mice missing IL-1ra to see how the protein deficiency affects immune function and destruction of insulin-producing islet beta cells. "We want to know if we ...

Researchers report widespread use of medications among pregnant women

2011-04-26
(Boston) – Researchers from Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Harvard School of Public Health, have reported widespread and increasing medication use among pregnant women. The study, which currently appears online in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, also found that medication use varied by socioeconomic status, maternal age, race/ethnicity and state of residence. Although a number of antenatal medication exposures are known to cause birth defects, there is insufficient ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Scientists model 'true prevalence' of COVID-19 throughout pandemic

New breakthrough to help immune systems in the fight against cancer

Through the thin-film glass, researchers spot a new liquid phase

Administering opioids to pregnant mice alters behavior and gene expression in offspring

Brain's 'memory center' needed to recognize image sequences but not single sights

Safety of second dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines after first-dose allergic reactions

Changes in disparities in access to care, health after Medicare eligibility

Use of high-risk medications among lonely older adults

65+ and lonely? Don't talk to your doctor about another prescription

Exosome formulation developed to deliver antibodies for choroidal neovascularization therapy

Second COVID-19 mRNA vaccine dose found safe following allergic reactions to first dose

Plant root-associated bacteria preferentially colonize their native host-plant roots

Rare inherited variants in previously unsuspected genes may confer significant risk for autism

International experts call for a unified public health response to NAFLD and NASH epidemic

International collaboration of scientists rewrite the rulebook of flowering plant genetics

Improving air quality reduces dementia risk, multiple studies suggest

Misplaced trust: When trust in science fosters pseudoscience

Two types of blood pressure meds prevent heart events equally, but side effects differ

New statement provides path to include ethnicity, ancestry, race in genomic research

Among effective antihypertensive drugs, less popular choice is slightly safer

Juicy past of favorite Okinawan fruit revealed

Anticipate a resurgence of respiratory viruses in young children

Anxiety, depression, burnout rising as college students prepare to return to campus

Goal-setting and positive parent-child relationships reduce risk of youth vaping

New research identifies cancer types with little survival improvements in adolescents and young adul

Oncotarget: Replication-stress sensitivity in breast cancer cells

Oncotarget: TERT and its binding protein: overexpression of GABPA/B in gliomas

Development of a novel technology to check body temperature with smartphone camera

The mechanics of puncture finally explained

Extreme heat, dry summers main cause of tree death in Colorado's subalpine forests

[Press-News.org] Psychologists warn that therapies based on positive emotions may not work for Asians