Contact Information:

Media Contact

Ryan Jaslow
ryan.jaslow@nyumc.org
212-404-3511

Twitter: NYULMC

http://www.med.nyu.edu




Kredyty mieszkaniowe Kredyty mieszkaniowe

Sprawdź aktualny ranking najlepszych kredytów mieszkaniowych w Polsce - atrakcyjne kredytowanie nieruchomości.

PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION
RSS - Press News Release
Add Press Release

Vision testing an effective tool for detecting concussion on the sidelines

Review article finds a test of rapid number naming detected concussion 86 percent of the time among youth, collegiate and professional athletes


2015-09-10
(Press-News.org) NEW YORK, NY - A timed vision test that involves rapidly reading numbers off of cards can be a valuable sideline tool for detecting whether a concussion occurred while playing sports, according to a meta-analysis and systematic review led by NYU Langone Medical Center concussion specialists.

Researchers at the NYU Langone Concussion Center reviewed studies that involved athletes who sustained a concussion during sporting activities and found the vision test, known as the King-Devick test, was 86 percent sensitive in detecting whether a concussion had occurred, as confirmed by clinical diagnosis. When combined with rapid assessments of balance and cognition, the testing battery was able to detect 100 percent of concussions that occurred among athletes in the studies that measured this outcome.

The study is published Thursday, September 10, 2015, in Concussion.

"There is no diagnostic substitute for a medical professional when it comes to evaluating an athlete for concussion, but physicians are not always on the sidelines during practice or a game when an injury might occur," says senior study author Laura Balcer, MD, MSCE, Co-director of the NYU Langone Concussion Center and a professor of neurology, population health and ophthalmology at NYU Langone. "Our study shows that an easy to administer vision test is a simple, effective tool that empowers parents, coaches, trainers - and even physicians - on the sidelines to have a protocol for deciding if an athlete should be removed from play."

For the rapid number naming test, athletes are given a baseline test before the season starts where they are asked to read numbers as quickly as they can off a series of three reading cards while being timed with a stopwatch. People who don't experience a concussion or head injury tend to have faster reading times when tested again during the season; however, those who are tested immediately after they may have sustained a concussion experience slower times.

Vision is important in concussion diagnosis because the visual pathways have extensive connections throughout the brain, and disruptions in these pathways could suggest a brain injury occurred. Previous studies have shown worsening scores on rapid number naming tests correlate with neurological conditions including Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Balcer and her colleagues conducted a meta-analysis review of 15 previously-completed studies where a rapid number naming test was utilized. All the studies were conducted on athletes, and all concussions were defined by a witnessed or reported blow to the head with neurological symptoms.

The review included 1,419 athletes, 112 of whom sustained a concussion. Professional hockey players, along with youth, collegiate and amateur players of football, hockey, soccer, lacrosse, basketball, boxing and rugby were among those studied.

Concussed athletes on average completed the King-Devick test 4.8 seconds longer than their baseline score, whereas non-concussed athletes improved their score by an average of 1.9 seconds. The test detected 96 out of 112 concussions (86 percent), and showed 90-percent specificity in distinguishing a concussed athlete versus a non-concussed, healthy control subject. Overall, if an athlete had a worsening in their time score compared to their baseline reading, they were five times more likely to have sustained a concussion.

Some studies included the review utilized other tests including the SCAT3 symptom checklist and timed tandem gait (walking) test, and importantly, a worsening in scores of at least one of the three tests was observed in 100 percent of concussed athletes.

"This tool as part of a simple battery of tests assessing cognition and balance can raise a flag for those athletes that require follow-up with a medical professional," says study co-author Steven Galetta, MD, the Philip K. Moskowitz, MD Professor and Chair of Neurology at NYU Langone Medical Center. Dr. Galetta, himself a former collegiate athlete, added, "In the heat of a game, there is a lot of chaos and confusion on sidelines, so anything that helps eliminate guesswork is needed."

A March study led by Dr. Galetta and Dr. Balcer, published in the Journal of Neuro-Ophthalmology, found the King-Devick test effective at helping to detect a concussion in student athletes as young as 5 years old.

A concussion is caused by a force transmitted to the head as a result of a direct blow to the body that results in new neurological symptoms. An estimated 4 million sports-related concussions occur each year in the United States each year, with long-term consequences on brain function becoming an increasingly prominent concern among those who play contact and collision sports.

INFORMATION:

Drs. Balcer and Galetta have no relevant financial disclosures or conflicts of interest with the sideline tests studied. Co-author, Dr. Danielle Leong, is an employee of King-Devick Test, LLC.

In addition to Drs. Balcer and Galetta, the co-authors of the study were: Kristin M. Galetta, Mengling Liu, Danielle F. Leong, and Rachel E. Ventura.


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Solving a genetic mystery: Bridging diagnostic discovery through social media

2015-09-10
HOUSTON -- (Sept. 10, 2015) - "Help us find others like Tess." Bo Bigelow's plea jumps off the page of his blog, echoing across the continent from his leafy green home city of Portland, Maine. When he posted his call to action, all he knew was that his young daughter has a mutation in her USP7 gene and that she has global developmental delay, hip dysplasia and visual impairment caused by her brain (not a problem in her eyes themselves) among other health issues. An article in the New Yorker magazine by Seth Mnookin gave him hope that finding other children with the same ...

Pancreatic cancer stem cells could be 'suffocated' by an anti-diabetic drug

2015-09-10
Cancer cells commonly rely on glycolysis, the type of metabolism that does not use oxygen to generate their energy however, researchers from Queen Mary University of London's Barts Cancer Institute and the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) in Madrid have now found that not all cancer cells are alike when it comes to metabolism. PancSCs can make use of a more efficient form of metabolism, called oxidative phosphorylation or OXPHOS, which does use oxygen. OXPHOS uses a part of the cell called mitochondria and it is this which can be targeted with anti-diabetic ...

Discovery offers hope for treating leukemia relapse post-transplant

2015-09-10
Targeting exhausted immune cells may change the prognosis for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse after a stem cell transplant, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. There is currently no effective treatment for this stage of leukemia, and patients have only a 5 percent chance of survival over five years. AML is a fast-moving cancer of the blood and bone marrow. In patients with AML, the bone marrow produces abnormal white or red blood cells or platelets. Powerful rounds of chemotherapy can damage bone marrow, so many patients are given ...

Researchers find neuroanatomical signature for schizophrenia

2015-09-10
While it is known that the incidence and outward symptoms of schizophrenia are strongly influenced by ethnic factors--for instance, patients from Asian ethnicities are more likely to experience visual hallucinations, whereas patients from western cultures and Caucasian ethnicities are more likely to suffer from auditory hallucinations--it was unclear if brain deficits would differ amongst suffers from various ethnic backgrounds. Previous research had indicated that there were neuroanatomical signatures for schizophrenia, but a study titled, "A Neuroanatomical Signature ...

Marginalized Vancouver residents dying at 8 times the national average

2015-09-10
Marginalized residents of Vancouver's Downtown Eastside are dying at more than eight times the national average, and treatable conditions are the greatest risk factors for mortality, researchers at the University of British Columbia have found. In research outlined in the British Medical Journal Open, investigators recruited 371 study participants aged 23 to 72 from single room occupancy hotels and the Downtown Community Court. Over the course of nearly four years, 31 participants died--a mortality rate 8.29 times the average for Canadians of the same age and sex. For ...

Moon's crust as fractured as can be

2015-09-10
Scientists believe that about 4 billion years ago, during a period called the Late Heavy Bombardment, the moon took a severe beating, as an army of asteroids pelted its surface, carving out craters and opening deep fissures in its crust. Such sustained impacts increased the moon's porosity, opening up a network of large seams beneath the lunar surface. Now scientists at MIT and elsewhere have identified regions on the far side of the moon, called the lunar highlands, that may have been so heavily bombarded -- particularly by small asteroids -- that the impacts completely ...

New protein manufacturing process unveiled

2015-09-10
Researchers from Northwestern University and Yale University have developed a user-friendly technology to help scientists understand how proteins work and fix them when they are broken. Such knowledge could pave the way for new drugs for a myriad of diseases, including cancer. The human body has a nifty way of turning its proteins on and off to alter their function and activity in cells: phosphorylation, the reversible attachment of phosphate groups to proteins. These "decorations" on proteins provide an enormous variety of function and are essential to all forms of life. ...

EARTH: Closing the gap in the tetrapod fossil record

2015-09-10
Alexandria, VA - In a study covered by EARTH Magazine, geoscientists identified fossils that are helping close the 15-million-year period in the fossil record known as Romer's Gap - the time from when fish showed early evidence of arms and legs until we definitively see four-legged land animals. Scientists have been wondering for decades whether Romer's Gap exists because tetrapod fossils from that time were not preserved, or because their fossils simply have not been discovered yet. These new fossils are starting to close the gap and change the way scientists interpret ...

Frozen embryos as successful as fresh embryos in IVF

2015-09-10
IVF cycles using embryos that have been frozen and thawed are just as successful as fresh embryos according to a new UNSW report. The Assisted Reproductive Technology in Australia and New Zealand 2013 report, by UNSW's National Perinatal Epidemiology and Statistics Unit (NPESU), shows in the five years to 2013, fresh embryo IVF cycles that resulted in a baby remained stable at around 23%. However, there has been a more than 25% increase in the birth rate for frozen embryo transfers in the last five years, rising from 18% to 23%. The report also found a growing number ...

Surgery improves quality of life for patients with chronic sinus infection, sleep dysfunction

2015-09-10
Patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (sinus infection) and obstructive sleep apnea report a poor quality of life, which is substantially improved following endoscopic sinus surgery, according to a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. A growing body of literature has highlighted the important links between quality of life (QOL), sleep, and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), such that disease severity has been correlated with worse QOL and patients with worse QOL have poor sleep. It is possible that CRS propagates sleep dysfunction through many ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

How your brain decides blame and punishment -- and how it can be changed

Uniquely human brain region enables punishment decisions

Pinpointing punishment

Chapman University publishes research on attractiveness and mating

E-cigarettes: Special issue from Nicotine & Tobacco Research

Placental problems in early pregnancy associated with 5-fold increased risk of OB & fetal disorders

UT study: Invasive brood parasites a threat to native bird species

Criminals acquire guns through social connections

Restoring ocean health

Report: Cancer remains leading cause of death in US Hispanics

Twin study suggests genetic factors contribute to insomnia in adults

To be fragrant or not: Why do some male hairstreak butterflies lack scent organs?

International team discovers natural defense against HIV

Bolivian biodiversity observatory takes its first steps

Choice of college major influences lifetime earnings more than simply getting a degree

Dominant strain of drug-resistant MRSA decreases in hospitals, but persists in community

Synthetic biology needs robust safety mechanisms before real world application

US defense agencies increase investment in federal synthetic biology research

Robots help to map England's only deep-water Marine Conservation Zone

Mayo researchers identify protein -- may predict who will respond to PD-1 immunotherapy for melanoma

How much water do US fracking operations really use?

New approach to mammograms could improve reliability

The influence of citizen science grows despite some resistance

Unlocking secrets of how fossils form

What happens on the molecular level when smog gets into the lungs?

Using ultrasound to clean medical instruments

Platinum and iron oxide working together get the job done

Tiny silica particles could be used to repair damaged teeth, research shows

A quantum lab for everyone

No way? Charity's logo may influence perception of food in package

[Press-News.org] Vision testing an effective tool for detecting concussion on the sidelines
Review article finds a test of rapid number naming detected concussion 86 percent of the time among youth, collegiate and professional athletes
Press-News.org is a service of DragonFly Company. All Rights Reserved.
Issuers of news releases are solely responsible for the accuracy of their content.