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Featured articles from the journal CHEST®, July 2021

Featured articles from the journal CHEST®, July 2021
2021-07-23
(Press-News.org) Glenview, Ill. - Published monthly, the journal CHEST® features peer-reviewed, cutting-edge original research in chest medicine: Pulmonary, critical care, sleep medicine and related disciplines. Journal topics include asthma, chest infections, COPD, critical care, diffuse lung disease, education and clinical practice, pulmonology and cardiology, sleep, and thoracic oncology.

The July issue of CHEST journal includes 85 articles, clinically relevant research, reviews, case series, commentary and more. Each month, the journal also offers complementary web and multimedia activities, including visual abstracts, to expand the reach of its most interesting, timely and relevant research.

"We have a lot of excellent content included in the July issue of CHEST," says Editor in Chief of the journal, Peter Mazzone, MD, MPH, FCCP. "I want to thank all of our contributors for their time, efforts, and extensive research that we are proud to share. This month, in particular, I want to celebrate the anniversary of our Humanities in Chest Medicine that was first launched in July 2020. It has quickly become a favorite for our readers and continues to embrace and celebrate the importance of the human element that accompanies work in pulmonary medicine."

Included in the July 2021 issue:

Chest infections Following a year of COVID and the rollout of vaccines, "Fast Development of High-Quality Vaccines in a Pandemic" describes how vaccines are developed at "warp speed" without compromising on the science, quality or safety.

Asthma Original research, "Hormone Replacement Therapy and Development of New Asthma," examines the association between hormone replacement therapy in menopause and new development of asthma. A visual abstract video for this research can be viewed here.

Critical care Focusing on those who had critical COVID, original research, "Pulmonary Function and Radiologic Features in Survivors of Critical COVID-19: A 3-Month Prospective Cohort" reveals persistent impairment was likely and concludes that pulmonary evaluation at three months after discharge is advised. A visual abstract accompanying this research can be viewed here.

Sleep Original research, "Randomized Controlled Trial of Solriamfetol for Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Analysis of Subgroups Adherent or Nonadherent to Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment," finds benefits to taking solriamfetol to improve excessive daytime sleepiness scores in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. A visual abstract for this research can be viewed here.

INFORMATION:

To view the entire July issue of CHEST journal, visit journal.chestnet.org, and follow @journal_CHEST on Twitter for the latest journal news.

About the American College of Chest Physicians The American College of Chest Physicians® (CHEST) is the global leader in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of chest diseases. Its mission is to champion advanced clinical practice, education communication and research in chest medicine. It serves as an essential connection to clinical knowledge and resources for its 19,000+ members from around the world who provide patient care in pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. For information about the American College of Chest Physicians, and its flagship journal CHEST®, visit chestnet.org.


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Featured articles from the journal CHEST®, July 2021

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[Press-News.org] Featured articles from the journal CHEST®, July 2021