PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Department of Energy announces $150 million for research on the science foundations for Energy Earthshots

DOE’s Energy Earthshots Initiative calls for innovation and collaboration to tackle the toughest barriers to deploying emerging clean energy technologies.

2023-03-21
(Press-News.org) WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $150 million for research into the crosscutting foundational science for multiple Energy Earthshots. This funding, provided by the Office of Science, will support fundamental research to accelerate breakthroughs in support of the Energy Earthshots Initiative.

“Our Energy Earthshot solutions start with science,” said Asmeret Asefaw Berhe, DOE’s Director of the Office of Science. “The Office of Science is working to find those solutions by supporting research that will target the remaining and emerging scientific challenges underlaying the 2035 Energy Earthshots Goals and beyond. The Office of Science is not just planning for tomorrow but is building the foundation for the future.” 

The Energy Earthshots drive integrated program development and execution across DOE's basic science and energy technology offices. They are part of an all-hands-on-deck approach to provide science and technology innovations that address the tough technological challenges required to achieve our climate and economic competitiveness goals. The Energy Earthshots will accelerate breakthroughs towards more abundant, affordable, and reliable clean energy solutions.

Six Energy Earthshots have been announced so far: Hydrogen Shot™, Long Duration Storage Shot™, Carbon Negative Shot™, Enhanced Geothermal Shot™, Floating Offshore Wind Shot™, and Industrial Heat Shot™.

The awards supported by this funding opportunity will bring together small teams focused on the crosscutting scientific challenges addressing multiple Energy Earthshots. Research will support basic science to seed innovations or to provide the scientific understanding to support existing technology development pathways for the needed portfolio of Energy Earthshot solutions.

Applications are open to all accredited U.S. colleges and universities, not-for-profit organizations, and private sector companies. Partnerships with other institutions, including national and federal laboratories, not-for-profit organizations, other federal agencies, or industry are encouraged. To strengthen the commitment to promoting a diversity of investigators and institutions supported by the DOE Office of Science, applications are explicitly encouraged to involve Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs), including Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). This funding announcement complements the funding announcement for the Energy Earthshot Research Centers, to be led by the DOE national laboratories.

Total combined planned funding is up to $150 million over three years, with $50 million in Fiscal Year 2023 dollars and outyear funding contingent on congressional appropriations. The funding anticipated for each award is $500K to $2M per year. 

A webinar on this opportunity will be held on March 27th at 12:30 p.m. EST. Please register here.

The Funding Opportunity Announcement, sponsored by the Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Basic Energy Sciences, and Biological and Environmental Research programs within the Department’s Office of Science, can be found here.

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Turn up your favorite song to improve medication efficacy

2023-03-21
EAST LANSING, Mich. – While listening to a favorite song is a known mood booster, researchers at Michigan State University have discovered that music-listening interventions also can make medicines more effective.  “Music-listening interventions are like over-the-counter medications,” said Jason Kiernan, an assistant professor in the College of Nursing. “You don’t need a doctor to prescribe them.”  While previous research studies have used music-listening interventions as a tool to treat pain and anxiety, Kiernan took a novel approach by studying the effects of music-listening interventions ...

Local manure regulations can help reduce water pollution from dairy farms

Local manure regulations can help reduce water pollution from dairy farms
2023-03-21
URBANA, Ill. – Animal agriculture is a major source of water pollution in the United States, as manure runoff carries excess nutrients into rivers and lakes. Because of their non-point source nature, most farms are not regulated under the federal Clean Water Act. This leaves pollution control up to the states, resulting in a patchwork of different approaches that are difficult to evaluate. A new study from the University of Illinois focuses on local manure management regulations in Wisconsin and how they affect water ...

Analysis by NYUAD researchers offers new insights into causes of persistent inequities affecting non-white scientists and their research

2023-03-21
Abu Dhabi, UAE, March 21, 2023 –  A team of NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) researchers, including data and computational social scientists, is reporting new findings that highlight previously unknown ways through which non-White scientists suffer from inequalities when it comes to the process of having their research considered, published, and cited, potentially hindering the advancement of their academic careers. Specifically, the NYUAD team’s analysis found fewer non-White editors than would be expected based on their share of authorship. In addition, non-White scientists endure longer waiting times between the submission ...

New compact and low-cost lensless radiomicroscope developed for nuclear medicine imaging

New compact and low-cost lensless radiomicroscope developed for nuclear medicine imaging
2023-03-21
Reston, VA—A novel imaging modality that can visualize the distribution of medical radiopharmaceuticals with very fine resolution has been developed and successfully tested, according to research published in the March issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. Known as the lensless radiomicroscope, the palm-sized instrument offers the same level of imaging performance as its closest imaging equivalent but comes with significantly larger field of view and costs less than $100. “While many nuclear medicine imaging modalities can quantitively measure ...

Patients with baclofen pumps may safely undergo transcutaneous spinal stimulation

Patients with baclofen pumps may safely undergo transcutaneous spinal stimulation
2023-03-21
East Hanover, NJ. March 21, 2023. Researchers from Kessler Foundation and Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation (collectively “Kessler”) conducted the first prospective study to assess whether transcutaneous spinal stimulation (TSS) interacts with implanted intrathecal baclofen (ITB) pump delivery systems for managing spasticity. The article, "Transcutaneous spinal stimulation in patients with intrathecal baclofen pump delivery system: A preliminary safety study," (doi: 10.3389/fnins.2022.1075293), was published December 21, 2022, in Frontiers in Neuroscience. It is ...

Co-infection with ‘superbug’ bacteria increases SARS-CoV-2 replication up to 15 times, Western study finds

2023-03-21
Global data shows nearly 10 per cent of severe COVID-19 cases involve a secondary bacterial co-infection – with Staphylococcus aureus, also known as Staph A., being the most common organism responsible for co-existing infections with SARS-CoV-2. Researchers at Western have found if you add a ‘superbug’ – methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) – into the mix, the COVID-19 outcome could be even more deadly.   The mystery of how and why these two pathogens, when combined, ...

Advisory role: New research suggests peer-advisor relationship is key to success

Advisory role: New research suggests peer-advisor relationship is key to success
2023-03-21
Collaborative research across the country has shown that strengthening the relationship between the student and advisor can increase retention rates in engineering doctoral studies. Dr. Marissa Tsugawa, along with professors from Penn State, The University of Oregon, Indiana University Bloomington, University of Reno, Nevada and North Carolina State University, recently published a study with the Journal of Engineering Education on March 17. The study connects an engineering student’s identity and the intention to complete a Ph.D. in engineering. Identity is a role that students give themselves during their experiences in the lab and classroom. The authors argue ...

Researchers get to the “bottom” of how beetles use their butts to stay hydrated

Researchers get to the “bottom” of how beetles use their butts to stay hydrated
2023-03-21
Beetles are champions at surviving in extremely dry environments. In part, this property is due to their ability to suck water from the air with their rear ends. A new collaborative study by researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the University of Edinburgh explains just how. Beyond helping to explain how beetles thrive in environments where few other animals can survive, the knowledge could eventually be used for more targeted and delicate control of global pests such as the grain weevil and red flour beetle. Insect pests eat their way through thousands of tons of food around the world every year. Food security in developing ...

New MU study shapes understanding of adaptive clothing customer needs

2023-03-21
With the growth of the niche adaptive clothing market comes new challenges for retailers, including making the process of online shopping more inclusive for people with varying degrees of disability as well as expanding the functionality and aesthetic appeal of individual garments. This study involved mining online reviews to understand the perspectives of adaptive clothing customers. University of Missouri researchers identified two main challenges for adaptive clothing consumers. Customers said ...

Aging | Age-related methylation changes in the human sperm epigenome

Aging | Age-related methylation changes in the human sperm epigenome
2023-03-21
“[...] we identified > 1,000 candidate genes with genome-wide significant age-related methylation changes in sperm.” BUFFALO, NY- March 21, 2023 – A new research paper was published in Aging (listed by MEDLINE/PubMed as "Aging (Albany NY)" and "Aging-US" by Web of Science) Volume 15, Issue 5, entitled, “Age-related methylation changes in the human sperm epigenome.” Advanced paternal age is associated with increased risks for reproductive and offspring medical problems. Accumulating evidence suggests age-related changes ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Cancer survivors who quit smoking have 36% lower cardiovascular risk than continuers

More depressed patients than previously estimated could have increased activation of their immune system

Shedding light on the complex flow dynamics within the small intestine

UK cardiology societies issue joint policy statement to stamp out bullying, harassment, and discrimination in the specialty

Predominance of young Asian men among large UK case series of laughing gas users

Ketamine nasal spray may prove safe and effective treatment for refractory migraine

The clams that fell behind, and what they can tell us about evolution and extinction

Medical school does not equip new doctors for the real working world, junior doctor warns

Unique “bawdy bard” act discovered, revealing 15th-century roots of British comedy

Saved from extinction, Southern California’s Channel Island Foxes now face new threat to survival

Genetic change increased bird flu severity during U.S. spread

New Jersey Health Foundation awards grants to Kessler Foundation to advance research in brain and spinal cord stimulation methods

Extracting a clean fuel from water

NJIT researchers awarded $4.6m to unlock mysteries of solar eruptions

Extended lymph node removal does not benefit patients with clinically localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer

Study finds sex education tool improves reproductive health knowledge among adolescent girls

No-till revolution could stop Midwest topsoil loss in its tracks

Computational method uncovers the effects of mutations in the noncoding genome

Extreme precipitation in northeast to increase 52% by the end of the century

Lung infection may be less transmissible than thought

Experimental decoy protects against SARS-CoV-2 infection

Light conveyed by the signal transmitting molecule sucrose controls growth of plant roots

Mitigating climate change through restoration of coastal ecosystems

Flexible nanoelectrodes can provide fine-grained brain stimulation

Teens with irregular sleep patterns have higher risk of school problems

Genetic risk information may help people avoid alcohol addiction

Advances in technology are driving popularity of EVs

Newborns with higher hair cortisol levels take longer to fall asleep

That’s not nuts: Almond milk yogurt packs an overall greater nutritional punch than dairy-based

Using AI to create better, more potent medicines

[Press-News.org] Department of Energy announces $150 million for research on the science foundations for Energy Earthshots
DOE’s Energy Earthshots Initiative calls for innovation and collaboration to tackle the toughest barriers to deploying emerging clean energy technologies.