PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Sudden infant death syndrome may have biologic cause

2023-05-25
(Press-News.org) Sudden infant death syndrome is a case where the death of an apparently healthy infant before their first birthday remains unexplained even after thorough investigation. Death generally seems to occur when infants are sleeping. While rare, it is the leading post-neonatal infant death in the United States today, occurring in 103 out of 100,000 live births a year. Despite the initial success of national public health campaigns promoting safe sleep environments and healthier sleep positions in infants in the 1990s in the United States, rates of cases have remained the same over the last three decades.

Researchers here collected tissue from the San Diego Medical Examiner’s Office related to infant deaths between 2004 and 2011. Researchers examined the brain stems of 70 infants who died during the period and tested them for consistent abnormalities.

They find that the serotonin 2A/C receptor is altered in sudden infant death cases compared to control cases of infant deaths. Previous research in rodents has shown that 2A/C receptor signaling contributes to arousal and autoresuscitation, protecting brain oxygen status during sleep. This new research supports the idea that a biological abnormality in some infants makes them vulnerable to death under certain circumstances.

The investigators here believe that sudden infant death syndrome occurs when three things happen together: a child is in a critical period of cardiorespiratory development in their first year, the child faces an outside stressor like a face-down sleep position or sharing a bed, and the child has a biological abnormality that makes them vulnerable to respiratory challenges while sleeping.

“The work presented builds upon previous work by our laboratory and others showing abnormalities in the serotonergic system of some SIDS infants,” said the paper’s lead author, Robin Haynes. “Although we have identified abnormalities in the serotonin 2A/C receptor in SIDS, the relationship between the abnormalities and cause of death remains unknown. Much work remains in determining the consequence of abnormalities in this receptor in the context of a larger network of serotonin and non-serotonin receptors that protect vital functions in cardiac and respiratory control when challenged. Currently, we have no means to identify infants with biological abnormalities in the serotonergic system. Thus, adherence to safe-sleep practices remains critical.”

The paper, “Altered 5-HT2A/C receptor binding in the medulla oblongata in the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): part I. Tissue-based evidence for serotonin receptor signaling abnormalities in cardiorespiratory- and arousal-related circuits,” will be available (at midnight on May 25th) at: https://doi.org/10.1093/jnen/nlad030.

Direct correspondence to: 
Robin L. Haynes
CJ Murphy Laboratory for SIDS Research
Boston Children’s Hospital
300 Longwood Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
robin.haynes@childrens.harvard.edu

To request a copy of the study, please contact:
Daniel Luzer 
daniel.luzer@oup.com

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Risk of death from liver disease is twice as high in lower-income countries, new research suggests

2023-05-24
Richmond, Va. (May 23, 2023) — New research is shedding light on global disparities in mortality rates from late-stage liver disease, also called cirrhosis. The study, published Monday in Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology, revealed that the risk of death for hospitalized cirrhosis patients was more than twice as high in lower-or lower-middle income countries compared to high-income countries, largely because of limited access to diagnostic and therapeutic resources. Liver disease occurs when a person’s liver experiences chronic inflammation, often due to obesity, excessive alcohol use, viral hepatitis or a combination. ...

Unlocking restful nights: unveiling teen-friendly social media habits for optimal sleep

2023-05-24
Toronto, ON - The US Surgeon General issued an advisory on social media and youth mental health a week after the American Psychological Association issued a health advisory on social media use in adolescence. Both advisories note potential links between social media use and poor sleep quality in teens. Given these concerns, what specific actions can teens and parents take to optimize sleep? A new national study, published in Sleep Health, offers insights into screen habits linked with better sleep. “Getting enough sleep is crucial ...

Researchers map the brain during blood sugar changes

Researchers map the brain during blood sugar changes
2023-05-24
EL PASO, Texas (May 24, 2023) – Researchers at The University of Texas at El Paso have successfully mapped specific regions in the brain that are activated in association with changes in blood sugar — also known as glucose — providing fundamental location information that could ultimately lead to more targeted therapies for people who struggle with conditions like diabetes. The landmark 13-year study, published in the Journal of Clinical Medicine, describes how the team used careful microscopic analysis to pinpoint specific cell populations ...

External factors shape genetic predisposition to lipids, Alzheimer’s and heart disease in MLXIPL gene

External factors shape genetic predisposition to lipids, Alzheimer’s and heart disease in MLXIPL gene
2023-05-24
“Recent findings suggest that neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases may have overlapping etiologies [...]” BUFFALO, NY- May 24, 2023 – A new research paper was published in Aging (listed by MEDLINE/PubMed as "Aging (Albany NY)" and "Aging-US" by Web of Science) Volume 15, Issue 9, entitled, “Exogenous exposures shape genetic predisposition to lipids, Alzheimer’s, and coronary heart disease in the MLXIPL gene locus.” In this new study, researchers Yury Loika, Elena Loiko, Fan ...

A student’s poor eating habits can lead to a lifetime of illness

2023-05-24
A UBC Okanagan researcher is cautioning that a person’s poor eating habits established during post-secondary studies can contribute to future health issues including obesity, respiratory illnesses and depression. Dr. Joan Bottorff, a Professor with UBCO’s School of Nursing, is one of several international researchers who published a multi-site study looking at the eating habits of university students. Almost 12,000 medical students from 31 universities in China participated in the study that aimed to determine the association between eating behaviours, obesity and various diseases. The point, ...

Recent UCLA computer grad constructs “Crown Jewel of Cryptography”

Recent UCLA computer grad constructs “Crown Jewel of Cryptography”
2023-05-24
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, today announced that Aayush Jain receives the 2022 ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award for his dissertation “Indistinguishability Obfuscation from Well-Studied Assumptions,” which established the feasibility of mathematically rigorous software obfuscation from well-studied hardness conjectures. The central goal of software obfuscation is to transform source code to make it unintelligible without altering what it computes.  Additional conditions may be added, such as requiring the transformed code to perform ...

Meet the 2023 ASBMB Advocacy Training Program delegates

2023-05-24
The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology announced the 12 delegates who will participate in the society’s Advocacy Training Program this summer. The ATP is a three-month summer externship that provides hands-on science policy and advocacy training and experience. After completing the educational component of the program, delegates will visit Capitol Hill to meet with policymakers in 2024. The ASBMB public affairs department runs the program. The society has trained 42 ASBMB members in four ATP cohorts, providing the foundational knowledge, skills ...

Does having Alzheimer’s genes increase your risk of epilepsy?

2023-05-24
MINNEAPOLIS – People with a genetic predisposition for Alzheimer’s disease may have an increased risk of epilepsy and people with a certain type of epilepsy may have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study published in the May 24, 2023, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. “Our research found that not only are people with Alzheimer’s disease more likely to develop epilepsy, but also that those with focal epilepsy, which accounts for ...

New study shows 1 in 5 “healthy” individuals actually have the metabolism of a prediabetic

2023-05-24
Scientists at Klick Labs have developed a new way to catch the earliest signs the human body is failing to control blood glucose levels, before it reaches prediabetic levels in patients.   In findings published today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings: Digital Health, researchers outlined a new method of analysis that flags a precursor to prediabetes called impaired glucose homeostasis (IGH). When they applied their patented mathematical method to data obtained from continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), scientists found about one in five study participants, considered healthy by medical standards, actually had glucose metabolism similar to those with prediabetes.   “For people ...

New UCI-led research shows people who live to be 90+ with superior thinking skills are resilient to Alzheimer’s pathology in their brains

New UCI-led research shows people who live to be 90+ with superior thinking skills are resilient to Alzheimer’s pathology in their brains
2023-05-24
Irvine, CA – May 24, 2023 – A University of California, Irvine-led team of researchers have discovered that the oldest-old, those who live to be 90+ and have superior cognitive skills, have similar levels of brain pathology as Alzheimer’s patients, however, they also have less brain pathology of other neurodegenerative diseases that cause memory and thinking problems. The study, “Superior Global Cognition in Oldest-Old is Associated with Resistance to Neurodegenerative Pathologies: Results from the 90+ Study,” was published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. “People ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Discovery of spontaneous inflow and outflow states of high-temperature plasma by energetic ions

Tax the rich, say a majority of adults across 17 G20 countries surveyed

Semaglutide leads to greater weight loss in women than men with HF, improves HF symptoms in both sexes

12.5, the 1st Impact Factor of COMMTR released!

Circadian clock impact on cluster headaches funded by $2.4M NIH grant for UTHealth Houston research

Study identifies first drug therapy for sleep apnea

How old is your bone marrow?

Boosting biodiversity without hurting local economies

ChatGPT is biased against resumes with credentials that imply a disability — but it can improve

Simple test for flu could improve diagnosis and surveillance

UT Health San Antonio researcher awarded five-year, $2.53 million NIH grant to study alcohol-assisted liver disease

Giving pre-med students hands-on clinical training

CAMH research suggests potential targets for prevention and early identification of psychotic disorders

Mapping the heart to prevent damage caused by a heart attack

Study challenges popular idea that Easter islanders committed ‘ecocide’

Chilling discovery: Study reveals evolution of human cold and menthol sensing protein, offering hope for future non-addictive pain therapies.

Elena Beccalli, new rector of Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, takes office on 1st July

Pacific Northwest Research Institute uncovers hidden DNA mechanisms of rare genetic diseases

Empowering older adults: Wearable tech made easier with personalized support

Pennington Biomedical researchers partner on award-winning Long Covid study

Cooling ‘blood oranges’ could make them even healthier – a bonus for consumers

Body image and overall health found important to the sexual health of older gay men, according to new studies

Lab-grown muscles reveal mysteries of rare muscle diseases

Primary hepatic angiosarcoma: Treatment options for a rare tumor

Research finds causal evidence tying cerebral small-vessel disease to Alzheimer’s, dementia

Navigating the Pyrocene: Recent Cell Press papers on managing fire risk

Restoring the Great Salt Lake would have environmental justice as well as ecological benefits

Cannabis, tobacco use, and COVID-19 outcomes

A 5:2 intermittent fasting meal replacement diet and glycemic control for adults with diabetes

Scientists document self-propelling oxygen decline in the oceans

[Press-News.org] Sudden infant death syndrome may have biologic cause