PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

New study shows 1 in 5 “healthy” individuals actually have the metabolism of a prediabetic

Klick Labs develops new method to flag earliest signs of Type 2 diabetes using CGM data

2023-05-24
(Press-News.org) Scientists at Klick Labs have developed a new way to catch the earliest signs the human body is failing to control blood glucose levels, before it reaches prediabetic levels in patients.

 

In findings published today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings: Digital Health, researchers outlined a new method of analysis that flags a precursor to prediabetes called impaired glucose homeostasis (IGH). When they applied their patented mathematical method to data obtained from continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), scientists found about one in five study participants, considered healthy by medical standards, actually had glucose metabolism similar to those with prediabetes.

 

“For people with diabetes, blood glucose levels can rise and fall like a wild roller-coaster ride with steep drops and peaks,” said Jaycee Kaufman, study lead author and research scientist at Klick Labs. “We found a similar pattern in patients with IGH, albeit those patterns were more like gentle waves than dramatic peaks, but intervention on this population could limit the likelihood of progression to full diabetes.”

 

A total of 384 people were equipped with a CGM for the study and assessed by a physician over a two-week time period. Participants were diagnosed diabetic, pre-diabetic, or healthy, according to guidelines outlined by the American Diabetes Association. After applying the mathematical model, patients were then re-classified into two groups based on their glucose homeostasis parameters: effective or impaired.

 

“What was most surprising is that 20 percent of participants, who were assessed using the standard screening tools for diabetes and cleared as healthy by a physician, were then found to have impaired glucose homeostasis–reinforcing it is now possible to provide an earlier, more accurate and sensitive assessment of people’s diabetic status,” said Yan Fossat, Vice President of Klick Labs.

 

About 34 million people have diabetes in the U.S. and one in three Americans have prediabetes or diabetes. North of the border, there are 11.7 million Canadians living with diabetes or prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes in the U.S., more than 80 percent don’t know they have it.

 

With research suggesting it is possible to reverse diabetes, or at least slow its progression, there is growing demand for screening tools that can flag at-risk individuals. Screening and monitoring involve reviewing risk factors such as age, BMI, and family history; and diagnosis relies primarily on the blood tests like glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT).

 

“This new method of analysis is a major step forward in the prevention and management of diabetes,” Fossat said. “Early detection and intervention is critical in the management of Type 2 diabetes, so our method has the potential to have a significant impact on the lives of millions of people worldwide.”
 

These findings are the latest in Klick’s ongoing work in the diabetes space. Their “Homeostasis as a proportional–integral control system” study, published in Nature Digital Medicine in 2020, was also based on mathematical modeling to determine some of the underlying changes in how glucose is regulated. This work was performed in ongoing collaboration with Ontario Tech University, Lennaert van Veen, Professor of Mathematics in the Faculty of Science, and funded in part by a Mitacs grant.

 

About Klick Applied Sciences (including Klick Labs)

Klick Applied Sciences’ diverse team of data scientists, engineers, and biological scientists conducts scientific research and develops AI/ML and software solutions as part of the company’s work to support commercial efforts using its proven business, scientific, medical, and technological expertise. Its 2019 Voice Assistants Medical Name Comprehension study laid the scientific foundation for rigorously testing voice assistant consumer devices in a controlled manner. Additional research in peer-reviewed journals, include “The need for artificial intelligence in digital therapeutics,” “Consensus study of risk factors and symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) using biomedical literature and social media data,” and “COVID-19 has inspired global healthcare innovation.”

 

About Klick Group

The Klick Group of companies–Klick Health (including Klick Katalyst and btwelve), Klick Media Group, Klick Applied Sciences (including Klick Labs), Klick Consulting, and Sensei Labs–is an ecosystem of brilliant talent collectively working to maximize their people’s and clients’ full potential. Established in 1997, Klick has teams across North America, with offices in New York, Philadelphia, Toronto, global hubs in London, São Paulo, and Singapore, and plans to open more offices in Basel, Buenos Aires, Munich, Paris, and Tokyo. Klick has consistently been named a Best Managed Company and Great Place to Work. Over the last two years alone, the company has been recognized with almost 30 Best Workplace awards, including Best Workplaces for Women, Best Workplaces for Inclusion, Most Admired Corporate Cultures, Fast Company’s Best Workplaces for Innovators, FORTUNE’s Best Workplaces in New York, and FORTUNE’s Best Workplaces in Advertising.

 

END


ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

New UCI-led research shows people who live to be 90+ with superior thinking skills are resilient to Alzheimer’s pathology in their brains

New UCI-led research shows people who live to be 90+ with superior thinking skills are resilient to Alzheimer’s pathology in their brains
2023-05-24
Irvine, CA – May 24, 2023 – A University of California, Irvine-led team of researchers have discovered that the oldest-old, those who live to be 90+ and have superior cognitive skills, have similar levels of brain pathology as Alzheimer’s patients, however, they also have less brain pathology of other neurodegenerative diseases that cause memory and thinking problems. The study, “Superior Global Cognition in Oldest-Old is Associated with Resistance to Neurodegenerative Pathologies: Results from the 90+ Study,” was published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. “People ...

Survival pathway and therapeutic target in metastatic colorectal and pancreatic cancer

Survival pathway and therapeutic target in metastatic colorectal and pancreatic cancer
2023-05-24
“Recent findings suggest that neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases may have overlapping etiologies [...]” BUFFALO, NY- May 24, 2023 – A new research paper was published in Aging (listed by MEDLINE/PubMed as "Aging (Albany NY)" and "Aging-US" by Web of Science) Volume 15, Issue 9, entitled, “Exogenous exposures shape genetic predisposition to lipids, Alzheimer’s, and coronary heart disease in the MLXIPL gene locus.” In this new study, researchers Yury Loika, Elena Loiko, Fan Feng, Eric Stallard, Anatoliy I. Yashin, Konstantin Arbeev, Allison L. Kuipers, Mary F. Feitosa, Michael A. Province, and Alexander ...

Researchers identify strong T-cell response in first-in-human nanoparticle HIV vaccine

2023-05-24
SEATTLE – MAY 24, 2023 – Researchers from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center in Seattle, Scripps Research in La Jolla, California, IAVI and other collaborating institutions have characterized robust T-cell responses in volunteers participating in the IAVI G001 Phase 1 clinical trial to test the safety and immune response of a self-assembling nanoparticle HIV vaccine. Their work, published in Science Translational Medicine, signals a major step toward development of a vaccine approach to end the HIV/AIDS ...

Clinicians supporting cancer patients with taste loss need educational materials and training

2023-05-24
AMHERST, Mass. – While an overwhelming majority of cancer patients experience taste disruption from their disease or treatment, they have consistently reported a lack of support from their doctors about this troubling side effect, according to research. A new study by the University of Massachusetts Amherst, focusing for the first time on the issue from the cancer clinicians’ point of view, reveals not a lack of concern about their patients’ taste loss but a lack of access to educational materials, ...

Epigenetic landscape modulates pioneer transcription factor binding

Epigenetic landscape modulates pioneer transcription factor binding
2023-05-24
(Memphis, Tenn.—May 24, 2023) Like thread tightly wrapped around a spool, DNA is wrapped around histones and packaged into structures called nucleosomes. Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are exploring how a type of transcription factor called a pioneer transcription factor accesses DNA even when it is tightly wound. Their work revealed how the epigenetic landscape influences transcription factor binding. Problems with transcription have been implicated in numerous cancers, so this more detailed understanding of the process may aid in developing future therapeutics. The study ...

A popular compostable plastic doesn’t break down in the ocean

A popular compostable plastic doesn’t break down in the ocean
2023-05-24
A widely used compostable plastic persists unchanged in marine environments for at least 14 months, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sarah-Jeanne Royer and colleagues from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. The study highlights the distinction between textile materials that can be composted in a controlled, industrial setting (PLA), and the ones that can undergo biodegradation in natural environments (cellulose-based textiles). The accumulation and persistence of oil-based plastic waste ...

Physical activity linked to higher pain tolerance

Physical activity linked to higher pain tolerance
2023-05-24
A new analysis of data from more than 10,000 adults shows that people who were physically active had higher pain tolerance than those who were sedentary, and that those with a higher level of activity had a higher level of pain tolerance. Anders Årnes of the University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 24, 2023. Prior research has suggested the possibility that a habit of engaging in a higher level of physical activity might help ease or prevent chronic pain by boosting pain tolerance. However, most studies on this topic have been small or focused on narrow groups of people. To help clarify the ...

U.S. teens who are food insecure are more likely to engage in emotional eating and consume sugar-sweetened beverages and junk foods

U.S. teens who are food insecure are more likely to engage in emotional eating and consume sugar-sweetened beverages and junk foods
2023-05-24
Article URL:  https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0285446 Article Title: Psychosocial correlates in patterns of adolescent emotional eating and dietary consumption Author Countries: USA Funding: The authors received no specific funding for this work. END ...

Scientists provide first field observations of coccolithophore osmotrophy

Scientists provide first field observations of coccolithophore osmotrophy
2023-05-24
Coccolithophores, a globally ubiquitous type of phytoplankton, play an essential role in the cycling of carbon between the ocean and atmosphere. New research from Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences shows that these vital microbes can survive in low-light conditions by taking up dissolved organic forms of carbon, forcing researchers to reconsider the processes that drive carbon cycling in the ocean. The findings were published this week in Science Advances. The ability to extract carbon from the direct absorption of dissolved organic carbon is known as osmotrophy. ...

Not so biodegradable: new study finds bio-based plastic and plastic-blend textiles do not biodegrade in the ocean

Not so biodegradable: new study finds bio-based plastic and plastic-blend textiles do not biodegrade in the ocean
2023-05-24
Plastic pollution is seemingly omnipresent in society, and while plastic bags, cups, and bottles may first come to mind, plastics are also increasingly used to make clothing, rugs, and other textiles.  A new study from UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography, published May 24 in the journal PLOS One, for the first time tracked the ability of natural, synthetic, and blended fabrics to biodegrade directly in the ocean.  Lead author Sarah-Jeanne Royer conducted an experiment off the Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier and found that natural and wood-based cellulose fabrics degraded within a month. Synthetic textiles, including so-called compostable ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Drug limits dangerous reactions to allergy-triggering foods, Stanford Medicine-led study of kids finds

Measuring the properties of light: Scientists realise new method for determining quantum states

For faster access to gene and cell therapies in Europe

Scientists deliver portable total chemical analysis without pumps and tubes

A very long, winding road: Developing novel therapeutics for metastatic tumors

Unlocking health: How In Our DNA SC is pioneering genetic screening for South Carolinians

Down Under Demo: ONR touts additive manufacturing tech at Australian event

Study shows benralizumab is effective as a treatment for eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, a rare form of vasculitis

Researchers identify new choice of therapy for rare autoimmune disease EGPA

Powering nitrogenases

NJIT marketing experts measure brain waves and skin current to predict emotions

Babies use immune system differently, but efficiently

Cloud clustering causes more extreme rain

Mindfulness at work protects against stress and burnout

Scientists closer to solving mysteries of universe after measuring gravity in quantum world

Revolutionary brain stimulation technique shows promise for treating brain disorders

Global warming increases the diversity of active soil bacteria

Patient mindset training helps care teams

Dual-energy harvesting device could power future wireless medical implants

Study: ‘Hexaplex’ vaccine aims to boost flu protection

New structural insights could lead to mechanical enhancement in alloys

New research challenges conventional picture of Parkinson's disease

Dairy cows fed botanicals-supplemented diets use energy more efficiently

Aston University receives nearly half a million pounds to create safer and greener batteries

New study shows glycan sugar coating of IgG immunoglobulin can predict cardiovascular health

Sir Peter Rigby appointed as honorary chair of Aston University’s new Digital Futures Institute

Yale School of Medicine receives a $575,000 grant from PolyBio Research Foundation to fund long COVID research

Common plant could help reduce food insecurity, researchers find

Innovative chemotherapy approach shows promise against lung cancer

Encoding computers of the future

[Press-News.org] New study shows 1 in 5 “healthy” individuals actually have the metabolism of a prediabetic
Klick Labs develops new method to flag earliest signs of Type 2 diabetes using CGM data