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Rotman School professor honored for contributions to the field of strategic management

Rotman School professor honored for contributions to the field of strategic management
2023-05-26
(Press-News.org)  Toronto – Anita M. McGahan, a professor at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, is this year’s recipient of the William D. Guth Distinguished Service Award from the Strategic Management Division of the Academy of Management, the preeminent professional association for management and organization scholars. In announcing the award, Division-Chair Elect Louise Mors, a professor at Copenhagen Business School, wrote that Prof. McGahan “has been dedicated to all aspects of the field of strategy” and cited “her outstanding service to the field of strategic management.”
 
The Guth Award recognizes a division member with at least 15 years of service to the field, who has made significant contributions to activities within the division, the Academy of Management, and/or to the broader field of strategic management. Prof. McGahan will receive the award during the Academy of Management’s annual meeting in Boston in August.  
 
McGahan is University Professor and George E. Connell Chair in Organizations and Society at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School. She holds cross-appointments with the University’s Temerty Faculty of Medicine and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and is affiliated with the Munk School’s Innovation Policy Lab, the School of Cities, the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre (WHO CC) at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, Massey College, and the Schwartz Reisman Institute for Technology and Society. Prof. McGahan is also a faculty member and Senior Fellow at the Burnes Center for Social Change at Northeastern University; Senior Associate at the Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness at Harvard University; and a past President of the Academy of Management. Previously she was the director of the PhD program and Associate Dean of Research at the Rotman School. 
 
Her credits include five books and over 200 articles, case studies, notes and other published material on competitive advantage, industry evolution, and innovation in the public interest. In 2010, she was awarded the Academy of Management BPS Division’s Irwin Distinguished Educator Award. In 2012, she received from the Academy its Career Distinguished Educator Award for her championship of reform in the core curriculum of Business Schools, and in 2021, she received the Academy’s Career Distinguished Service Award for leadership in the Academy and other organizations. In 2018, she was awarded both the Inaugural Educational Impact Award and, with Michael E. Porter, the Dan and Mary Lou Schendel Best Paper Prize from the Strategic Management Society. In 2012 she was elected a Fellow of the Strategic Management Society, and in 2015 she was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Management.  

The Rotman School of Management is part of the University of Toronto, a global centre of research and teaching excellence at the heart of Canada’s commercial capital. Rotman is a catalyst for transformative learning, insights and public engagement, bringing together diverse views and initiatives around a defining purpose: to create value for business and society. For more information, visit www.rotman.utoronto.ca

-30-

For more information:
Ken McGuffin
Manager, Media Relations
Rotman School of Management
University of Toronto
Voice 416.946.3818
E-mail mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca

END

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[Press-News.org] Rotman School professor honored for contributions to the field of strategic management