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Visual impairment and real-world home physical activity with home environment in an older population

JAMA Ophthalmology

2024-02-08
(Press-News.org) About The Study: The results of this study demonstrated that home environment features, particularly lighting, may influence home activity metrics in older adults with visual impairment. Further prospective studies would be needed to confirm if home modifications can improve at-home activity.

Authors: Pradeep Y. Ramulu, M.D., M.H.S., Ph.D., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/ 

(doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2023.6436)

Editor’s Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

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Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2023.6436?guestAccessKey=0c7b70c1-9219-402e-89f3-ff7dc3521ae4&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=020824

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[Press-News.org] Visual impairment and real-world home physical activity with home environment in an older population
JAMA Ophthalmology