PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
FREE PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Mouse study shows bacteriophage therapy could fight drug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

Mouse study shows bacteriophage therapy could fight drug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae
2021-02-23
(Press-News.org) WHAT: Using viruses instead of antibiotics to tame troublesome drug-resistant bacteria is a promising strategy, known as bacteriophage or "phage therapy." Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have used two different bacteriophage viruses individually and then together to successfully treat research mice infected with multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 258 (ST258). The bacterium K. pneumoniae ST258 is included on a CDC list of biggest antibiotic resistance threats in the United States. High rates of morbidity and mortality are associated with untreated K. pneumoniae infections.

Phage therapy has been pursued for about a century, though conclusive research studies are rare and clinical results--from a handful of reports--have provided mixed results. In the new paper published in the journal mBio, the NIH scientists note that phages are of great interest today because of a dearth of alternative treatment options for drug-resistant infections. Bacterial resistance has emerged against even the newest drug combinations, leaving some patients with few or no effective treatment options.

In research conducted in Hamilton, Montana, at Rocky Mountain Laboratories--part of the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases--and in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, scientists completed a series of studies on research mice infected with ST258. They treated the mice with either phage P1, phage P2, or a combination of the two, all injected at different times following ST258 infection. The scientists had isolated phages P1 and P2 in 2017 from raw sewage that they screened for viruses that would infect ST258--an indication that phages can be found just about any place. Phages P1 and P2 are viruses from the order Caudovirales, which naturally infect bacteria.

Each of the three experimental treatment regimens helped the mice recover from ST258 infection. The scientists noted that the dose of phage provided was less vital to recovery than was the timing of when the dose was received. Mice treated 1 hour after infection showed the strongest recovery, followed by those treated eight hours after infection and then those treated at 24 hours. Control mice treated with saline all quickly developed severe disease and died.

The scientists also checked the blood and tissue of phage-treated mice for the presence of ST258 bacteria and found there were significantly fewer bacteria at all time points regardless of the treatment method used, as compared to control mice.

Unfortunately, the scientists also found that ST258 bacteria recovered in the blood and tissue samples of phage-treated mice already had begun developing phage resistance, a finding they are continuing to investigate. The group also is studying how phage therapy results compare between samples of ST258-infected mouse blood and human blood, and are examining whether components of human blood can interfere with phage efficacy.

This study represents a first step in evaluating the use of phage therapy for treatment of severe K. pneumoniae ST258 infection in humans.

INFORMATION:

ARTICLE: S Hesse et al. Bacteriophage treatment rescues mice infected with multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258. mBio DOI: 10.1128/mBio.00034-21 (2021).

RELATED: S Hesse et al. Phage resistance in multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 evolves via diverse mutations that culminate in impaired adsorption. mBio DOI: (2020).

WHO: Frank DeLeo, Ph.D., chief of the Laboratory of Bacteriology at NIAID's Rocky Mountain Laboratories, and Shayla Hesse, M.D., a clinical fellow at the National Cancer Institute, are available to comment on this study.

CONTACT: To schedule interviews, please contact
Ken Pekoc,
(301) 402-1663,
kpekoc@niaid.nih.gov.

NIAID conducts and supports research--at NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwide--to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID website.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit http://www.nih.gov/.

NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health®


[Attachments] See images for this press release:
Mouse study shows bacteriophage therapy could fight drug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

'Walking' molecule superstructures could help create neurons for regenerative medicine

Walking molecule superstructures could help create neurons for regenerative medicine
2021-02-23
Imagine if surgeons could transplant healthy neurons into patients living with neurodegenerative diseases or brain and spinal cord injuries. And imagine if they could "grow" these neurons in the laboratory from a patient's own cells using a synthetic, highly bioactive material that is suitable for 3D printing. By discovering a new printable biomaterial that can mimic properties of brain tissue, Northwestern University researchers are now closer to developing a platform capable of treating these conditions using regenerative medicine. A key ingredient to the discovery is the ability to control the self-assembly processes of molecules within the ...

Fibre-integrated, high-repetition-rate water window soft X-ray source

Fibre-integrated, high-repetition-rate water window soft X-ray source
2021-02-23
Bright, coherent soft X-ray radiation (SXR) is used in many scientific applications such as advanced absorption spectroscopy or lens-less imaging, and in fundamental research e.g. to produce extremely short isolated optical pulses. Therefore, the generation, control, and detection of this type of short-wavelength light is highly important in fields like fundamental atomic physics, solid-state physics, the semiconductor industry, material science and biology. To date, high photon flux in the soft X-ray spectral region is mostly delivered by large-scale facilities like synchrotrons or free electron lasers. An alternative is to use high-order harmonic generation (HHG) sources, which are currently driven by pulsed laser systems with ...

Artificial pancreas system upgraded with AI algorithm

Artificial pancreas system upgraded with AI algorithm
2021-02-23
Diabetes is on the rise worldwide. It is a permanent condition that requires care over a life time. To help manage it, an artificial pancreas system, which automatically measures blood sugar levels to infuse the appropriate amount of insulin into the blood, has now become smarter thanks to AI learning. A research team, led by Professor Sung-Min Park and Ph.D. candidate Seunghyun Lee and M.S. candidate Jiwon Kim of POSTECH's Department of Convergence IT Engineering and Electrical Engineering, has newly developed a reinforcement learning (RL) based AI algorithm that calculates the ...

Alzheimer Europe sets out recommendations to improve data sharing in dementia research

Alzheimer Europe sets out recommendations to improve data sharing in dementia research
2021-02-23
Luxembourg, 23 February 2021 - At an online European Parliament workshop hosted by Deirdre Clune MEP (Ireland), Alzheimer Europe launched a new report "Data Sharing in Dementia Research", which reviews recent changes in EU research policy and sets out recommendations to improve data sharing in dementia research. In this report, Alzheimer Europe evaluates the legal and policy landscapes that dementia researchers have had to navigate since the launch of Horizon 2020 in 2013. The report identifies key barriers and enablers for data sharing. It maps the Horizon 2020 dementia research portfolio, assessing the scale of EU investment in dementia research and the use of clinical ...

Saki monkeys get screen time for more control over their lives in captivity

2021-02-23
Helsinki, Finland--Technology helps humans maintain connections, get work done, and relax after a long day. How it can best improve the lives of animals, particularly those in captivity, however, has remained an open question. Scientists from Aalto University, in collaboration with Korkeasaari Zoo, have designed and built an on-demand video device for white-faced saki monkeys to activate as and when they like. While enrichment systems for zoo animals have been around for some time, very few offer animals the ability to choose when and how they use the device, even though choice and control are known to promote animal welfare. 'We were very much interested in how we can give animals control over their ...

Reimagined US-Middle East strategy would lean less on arms sales, more on dev't/governance

2021-02-23
U.S. policies in the Middle East are built on outdated "legacy" aid packages, massive arms sales and a disproportionate focus on the Iranian threat that fail to advance American interests - or help the region's people - and need to be rethought, according to a new RAND Corporation report. The United States devotes an overwhelming share of foreign military financing to just three countries - Israel, Egypt and Jordan, which received 81% of the $6 billion spent globally in 2019. If policymakers were to pursue an alternative strategy outlined by RAND researchers, ...

The magic angle of twisted graphene

The magic angle of twisted graphene
2021-02-23
Graphene, a two-dimensional material composed exclusively of carbon, has revealed extraordinary properties, including thermal and electrical conductivity, transparency, and flexibility. When combined, these properties become particularly interesting in the age of touch screens and flexible electronics! 'Unlike 3D materials, graphene has a height reduced to the ultimate dimension of the atom. It's therefore a carbon atom plane,' explains Prof. Jean-Christophe Charlier, a specialist in nanoscopic physics at the Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences of UCLouvain. In a study published in Nature, the scientist and his team dissected the behaviour of electrons when two layers of graphene superimposed at an ...

Drifter or homebody? Study first to show where whitespotted eagle rays roam

2021-02-23
Its muscular body shape and large pectoral fins are perfect for long-distance travel, yet movement patterns of the whitespotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari) remain a mystery. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in collaboration with Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium, the University of Florida and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, are the first to conduct a multiyear study examining large-scale movements of whitespotted eagle rays in United States waters. Between 2016 and 2018, scientists fitted 54 rays with acoustic transmitters ...

Largest comprehensive Middle East GWAS reveals Arab genetic risk factors

Largest comprehensive Middle East GWAS reveals Arab genetic risk factors
2021-02-23
Doha, Qatar - (February 23, 2021) - A group of researchers at Qatar Foundation have reported the first and largest genetic association study in the Middle East, that has been published online in Nature Communications - a leading a peer-reviewed, open access, scientific journal published by Nature Research. The study titled "Whole genome sequencing in the Middle Eastern Qatari population identifies genetic associations with 45 clinically relevant traits" highlights a vital piece of information wherein now there is a better understanding of the genetic risk factors that are specific to the Arab population, including those that are shared with other ethnicities. Qatar was among the first countries to launch its own large-scale, national genome project. Qatar Genome ...

New features of a gene defect that affects muzzle length and caudal vertebrae in dogs

New features of a gene defect that affects muzzle length and caudal vertebrae in dogs
2021-02-23
A recent genetic study at the University of Helsinki provides new information on the occurrence of a DVL2 gene defect associated with a screw tail and its relevance to canine constitution and health. The variant was found in several Bulldog and Pit Bull type breeds, and it was shown to result in caudal vertebral anomalies and shortening of the muzzle. The DLV2 variant may also affect the development of the heart. Dog breeding is often focused on appearance. In some breeds, the ideal body shape is bulky, with a broad head and short muzzle, short legs and a very short and kinked tail, also known as a "screw tail". In a previous study in the United States, screw tail was linked to a variant in the DVL2 gene. The variant has become enriched ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Why some coronavirus strains are more infectious than others

Scientists reveal details of antibodies that work against Zika virus

Scientists uncover new details of SARS-CoV-2 interactions with human cells

Antibodies recognize and attack different SARS-CoV-2 spike shapes

How SARS-CoV-2's sugar-coated shield helps activate the virus

A Canadian success story: world-first to treat Fabry disease with gene therapy

Chimpanzees and humans share overlapping territories

Allergy season starts earlier each year due to climate change and pollen transport

Study shows opioid use among US patients with knee osteoarthritis costs 14 billion dollars in societal costs

On the line: Watching nanoparticles get in shape

A-maze-ing pheasants have two ways of navigating

CAR T-cell therapy generates lasting remissions in patients with multiple myeloma

Fantastic voyage: Nanobodies could help CRISPR turn genes on and off

Baby mice have a skill that humans want - and this microchip might help us learn it

New discoveries on the containment of COVID-19 finds travel bans are of limited value

UM scientists achieve breakthrough in culturing corals and sea anemones cells

New shape-changing 4D materials hold promise for morphodynamic tissue engineering

Apollo rock samples capture key moments in the Moon's early history, study find

COVID-19 isolation linked to increased domestic violence, researchers suggest

What to do when a mammogram shows swollen lymph nodes in women just vaccinated for COVID

After Hurricane Irma, soundscape reveals resilient reef ecosystem

Parker Solar Probe offers stunning view of Venus

Ancient skeletal hand could reveal evolutionary secrets

Study finds human-caused North Atlantic right whale deaths are being undercounted

Bearded seals are loud -- but not loud enough

Tool that more efficiently analyzes ocean color data will become part of NASA program

Paleontologists discover new insect group after solving 150-year-old mystery

'Miracle poison' for novel therapeutics

Over 80% of Atlantic Rainforest remnants have been impacted by human activity

Researchers use machine learning to identify autism blood biomarkers

[Press-News.org] Mouse study shows bacteriophage therapy could fight drug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae