PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

The pandemic a tough time also for pharmacies

The pandemic a tough time also for pharmacies
2023-09-15
(Press-News.org) Customers showing up even when they were sick, not agreeing with the restrictions, and many new tasks for staff. These are factors that contributed to heavier workloads and tougher work environments in pharmacies during the pandemic, a study reveals.

The scientific study, published in the journal Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy, was conducted by researchers at the University of Gothenburg and Åbo Akademi University.

The data consists of a questionnaire that was distributed to all pharmacists working in pharmacies in Sweden. The number of respondents was 2 034, or 41 percent. The group of pharmacists includes prescriptionists and pharmacists.

While many parts of society were affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, pharmacists make up a group that has not received much attention. According to the study, a majority of pharmacists experienced increased workloads and a deteriorating work environments.

Customer conflicts and infection risk

Most pharmacists (62 percent) felt that their workload had increased during the pandemic, while the work environment had deteriorated. 47 percent felt that the physical work environment had deteriorated, while 59 percent of respondents felt that the psychosocial work environment had deteriorated.

Reasons that were highlighted included conflicts due to the unwillingness of some customers to comply with the restrictions. Pharmacists also described an increased fragmentation of their work as their regular tasks were expanded with rapidly introduced new tasks during the pandemic.

For example, pharmacists would ensure that the number of customers in the pharmacy was in line with regulations, carry out extra cleaning or serve customers outside the pharmacy.

Respondents were not satisfied with the communication within pharmacy companies and described a lack of understanding of the situation in pharmacies during the pandemic by both companies and society in general. In addition, there was a fear of contracting COVID-19.

Communication and understanding

Christina Ljungberg Persson is a senior lecturer in community pharmacy at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg and the first author of the study.

“When other healthcare services became less available, pharmacies remained open and customers increasingly turned to pharmacies for advice even if they were ill,” she says, adding:

“Clear communication within a pharmacy company is important to show that management understands the burden a pandemic places on pharmacists who serve customers.”

Despite the increased workload and deterioration of the work environment, 55% of respondents felt that patient safety in pharmacies had not been affected. This result is not in line with other studies where high workloads and poorer work environments have often been linked to impaired patient safety. The researchers therefore call for more studies on patient safety in Swedish pharmacies during the pandemic.

END

[Attachments] See images for this press release:
The pandemic a tough time also for pharmacies The pandemic a tough time also for pharmacies 2

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

Engineers join forces for eco-efficient online shopping

Engineers join forces for eco-efficient online shopping
2023-09-15
Home-delivery services perpetually compete for the consumer’s attention not only through advertisements but also through methods that reduce basket decision time or make new suggestions. Current research on the topic focuses on optimizing delivery schedules and minimizing costs. However, neither the insufficiency of home delivery options for some cities nor the bigger problem of high carbon emissions due to the abundance of it, are resolved. A new study conducted by Koç University Industrial Engineering Department professor Barış Yıldız takes a fresh perspective ...

Receipt of BNT162b2 vaccine and COVID-19 ambulatory visits in young US children

2023-09-15
About The Study: Receiving at least two doses of wild-type BNT162b2 vaccine (Pfizer) was associated with a reduced risk of COVID-19 emergency department or urgent care and outpatient visits in children younger than five years. The risk of SARS-CoV-2 encounters appeared lower for those with two versus three doses of BNT162b2, albeit with wide CIs, which is likely due to more immune-evasive Omicron sublineages (e.g., BQ.1-related and XBB-related strains) becoming dominant by the time young children received their third dose and longer median time since dose three compared with dose two. Authors: Sara Y. Tartof, Ph.D., M.P.H., of ...

New parent? Night shift? New analysis suggests ideal nap strategy to survive all-nighters

2023-09-15
New analysis of pilot studies on night shift naps conducted from 2012 to 2018 revealed the ideal snoozing strategy that might help counteract drowsiness and fatigue during a 16-hour overnight duty. The findings can also benefit new parents. Reanalysis of data showed that when staying up all night, scheduling two nap sessions — a 90-minute one followed by a quick 30-minute shut-eye later — is the optimal choice over a single 120-minute snooze in putting off drowsiness and fatigue. The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports. “A 90-minute nap to maintain long-term performance and a ...

Anesthesiology researcher pipeline lags behind other specialties

2023-09-15
CHICAGO — Anesthesiology researchers are responsible for some of medicine’s most significant advances, from the Apgar score that tests a newborn’s health to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). But the number of medical residents in the anesthesiology physician-scientist (researcher) pipeline trails other specialties, particularly among women, according to findings of the Anesthesia Research Council (ARC), published in the journal Anesthesia & Analgesia. Out of eleven medical specialties, anesthesiology ranked eighth both for the percentage of entering residents ...

Third Elaine Redding Brinster Prize awarded for development of sickle cell disease therapy

2023-09-15
PHILADELPHIA—For his work discovering the basis for hemoglobin gene switching and applying those insights to develop a therapy for sickle cell disease and other blood diseases, the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania awarded Stuart Orkin, MD the third Elaine Redding Brinster Prize in Science or Medicine. Orkin’s research advanced the understanding of how the fetal hemoglobin gene— the main oxygen carrier protein in the human fetus—is silenced in adults. He also developed a therapy that re-activates the fetal gene for adult hemoglobin gene defects, which cause ...

Corning® launches Videodrop, revolutionizing real-time nanoparticle detection and analysis

2023-09-15
CORNING, N.Y. | Corning Incorporated | September 15, 2023 - Corning Incorporated (NYSE: GLW) today announced the launch of Corning® Videodrop, an optical technology that applies the principles of interferometric microscopy to quantify the size and concentration of nanoparticles. The latest addition to the company’s growing suite of bioprocessing technology, Videodrop can analyze a solution in less than 60 seconds, and requires only a single 5-10 µl drop of sample material for testing. The technology is capable of collecting a physical titer of viral vectors such as lentivirus, ...

Groundbreaking soft valve technology enabling sensing and control integration in soft robots

Groundbreaking soft valve technology enabling sensing and control integration in soft robots
2023-09-15
Soft inflatable robots have emerged as a promising paradigm for applications that require inherent safety and adaptability. However, the integration of sensing and control systems in these robots has posed significant challenges without compromising their softness, form factor, or capabilities. Addressing this obstacle, a research team jointly led by Professor Jiyun Kim (Department of New Material Engineering, UNIST) and Professor Jonbum Bae (Department of Mechanical Engineering, UNIST) has developed groundbreaking “soft valve” technology—an all-in-one solution that integrates sensors and control valves while maintaining complete softness. Traditionally, ...

Living in a disadvantaged neighborhood affects food choices, weight gain and the microstructure of the brain

2023-09-15
You are what you eat, according to the adage. But it’s not just the body that’s impacted. According to research from UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, living in a disadvantaged neighborhood can affect food choices, weight gain and even the microstructure of the brain. The study, appearing in Communications Medicine, a Nature journal, finds poor quality of available foods, increased intake of calories from foods high in trans-fatty acids, and environments that do not foster physical activity, all prevalent in disadvantaged neighborhoods, disrupt the flexibility ...

A NICER approach to genome editing

A NICER approach to genome editing
2023-09-15
Osaka, Japan – The gene editing technique CRISPR/Cas9 has allowed researchers to make precise and impactful changes to an organism’s DNA to fix mutations that cause genetic disease. However, the CRISPR/Cas9 method can also result in unintended DNA mutations that may have negative effects. Recently, researchers in Japan have developed a new gene editing technique that is as effective as CRISPR/Cas9 while  significantly reducing these unintended mutations. In a new study published in Nature ...

Learn the intricacies in solving problems related to energy transfer

Learn the intricacies in solving problems related to energy transfer
2023-09-15
Volume 2 of the series on Solved Problems in Transport Phenomena is out. This unique compendium covers energy transfer at the microscopic and macroscopic levels in a format that does not overwhelm students with a large repertoire of problems. It uses clear highlights and easy-to-follow concept presentations to help students grasp the methodology in problem solving. Solved Problems in Transport Phenomena: Energy Transfer shows the students how to tackle a problem related to heat transfer as if they were going to solve it for the first time in their lives. A balanced approach ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

12.5, the 1st Impact Factor of COMMTR released!

Circadian clock impact on cluster headaches funded by $2.4M NIH grant for UTHealth Houston research

Study identifies first drug therapy for sleep apnea

How old is your bone marrow?

Boosting biodiversity without hurting local economies

ChatGPT is biased against resumes with credentials that imply a disability — but it can improve

Simple test for flu could improve diagnosis and surveillance

UT Health San Antonio researcher awarded five-year, $2.53 million NIH grant to study alcohol-assisted liver disease

Giving pre-med students hands-on clinical training

CAMH research suggests potential targets for prevention and early identification of psychotic disorders

Mapping the heart to prevent damage caused by a heart attack

Study challenges popular idea that Easter islanders committed ‘ecocide’

Chilling discovery: Study reveals evolution of human cold and menthol sensing protein, offering hope for future non-addictive pain therapies.

Elena Beccalli, new rector of Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, takes office on 1st July

Pacific Northwest Research Institute uncovers hidden DNA mechanisms of rare genetic diseases

Empowering older adults: Wearable tech made easier with personalized support

Pennington Biomedical researchers partner on award-winning Long Covid study

Cooling ‘blood oranges’ could make them even healthier – a bonus for consumers

Body image and overall health found important to the sexual health of older gay men, according to new studies

Lab-grown muscles reveal mysteries of rare muscle diseases

Primary hepatic angiosarcoma: Treatment options for a rare tumor

Research finds causal evidence tying cerebral small-vessel disease to Alzheimer’s, dementia

Navigating the Pyrocene: Recent Cell Press papers on managing fire risk

Restoring the Great Salt Lake would have environmental justice as well as ecological benefits

Cannabis, tobacco use, and COVID-19 outcomes

A 5:2 intermittent fasting meal replacement diet and glycemic control for adults with diabetes

Scientists document self-propelling oxygen decline in the oceans

Activating molecular target reverses multiple hallmarks of aging

Cannabis use tied to increased risk of severe COVID-19

How to make ageing a ‘fairer game’ for all wormkind

[Press-News.org] The pandemic a tough time also for pharmacies