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Argonne National Laboratory launches South Side STEM Opportunity Landscape Project at DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center

New innovative STEM maps and visualizations will help Chicago communities build STEM learning pathways for all ages

Argonne National Laboratory launches South Side STEM Opportunity Landscape Project at DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center
2023-09-29
(Press-News.org) A transformative initiative aimed at identifying, enhancing and promoting science, technology, engineering and mathematics resources within local communities.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory is proud to announce the official launch of the South Side STEM Opportunity Landscape Project, a transformative initiative aimed at identifying, enhancing and promoting science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) resources within local communities.

As part of the Argonne in Chicago initiative that includes offices in Hyde Park, the project, which was developed in collaboration with Northwestern University’s Digital Youth Network and input from educators, community organizations and local businesses, seeks to pinpoint STEM resources across nine South Side Chicago communities: Douglas, Oakland, Grand Boulevard, Kenwood, Washington Park, Hyde Park, Woodlawn, Greater Grand Crossing and South Shore. The project effectively illuminates the full spectrum of STEM program providers, locations and learning spaces across all nine communities.

The launch of the project was commemorated at the DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center where attendees had the opportunity to witness a live demonstration of the new website that included maps, stats and graphics of STEM program providers, locations where STEM is happening, and learning spaces. Event participants were also engaged in dynamic group discussions that delved into the project’s mission and methodology, and its projected influence on STEM learning experiences from kindergarten to career within these nine communities. Additionally, the event showcased an array of organizations offering insights into workforce development, internship opportunities and STEM education.

“Argonne’s STEM Opportunity Landscape Project provides a free website that elevates the STEM learning, workforce and employment opportunities within these nine communities for learners of all ages,” said Meridith Bruozas, the institutional partnerships director at Argonne. ​“This tool provides valuable insight into crafting deliberate STEM learning pathways K-Career, addressing and closing existing gaps, fostering strategic partnerships, and optimizing available resources to enrich STEM opportunities.”

The core objectives of the STEM Opportunity Landscape Project include:

Capture south side STEM opportunity data from educators, STEM providers, workforce agencies and employers to create a learning landscape that visualizes STEM resources, places and career opportunities. Provide STEM- and community-based organizations with data to inform programming, policies and strategies that advance and support robust STEM education and workforce opportunities. Host community data-driven conversations to explore existing strengths and identify gaps and resource needs. Cultivate new partnerships and relationships with and across the community to support the development of new programming and garnering of new resources. “We are excited to introduce this comprehensive STEM resource to the participating communities,” said Bruozas. ​“With the tool launched, we are excited about the next phase of the project — diving into the data with the community. This will include hosting data-driven community conversations and co-creating a plan for what STEM learning looks like on the south side.”

The STEM Opportunity Landscape Project is open and accessible to all interested viewers at no costs. For more information on the STEM Opportunity Landscape Project, email chicagostem@​anl.​gov. To access the South Side STEM Opportunity Landscape website, visit www​.south​side​stem​land​scape​.org. For more information about Argonne in Chicago, please visit our website www​.anl​.gov/​C​h​icago.

Argonne National Laboratory seeks solutions to pressing national problems in science and technology. The nation’s first national laboratory, Argonne conducts leading-edge basic and applied scientific research in virtually every scientific discipline. Argonne researchers work closely with researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and federal, state and municipal agencies to help them solve their specific problems, advance America’s scientific leadership and prepare the nation for a better future. With employees from more than 60 nations, Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, visit https://​ener​gy​.gov/​s​c​ience.

END

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Argonne National Laboratory launches South Side STEM Opportunity Landscape Project at DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center Argonne National Laboratory launches South Side STEM Opportunity Landscape Project at DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center 2

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[Press-News.org] Argonne National Laboratory launches South Side STEM Opportunity Landscape Project at DuSable Black History Museum and Education Center
New innovative STEM maps and visualizations will help Chicago communities build STEM learning pathways for all ages