PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Exercise boosts anti-cancer immunity and reduces inflammation in Lynch Syndrome patients

Study shows, for the first time, biological effects of exercise on the immune system in patients at high risk for cancer

Exercise boosts anti-cancer immunity and reduces inflammation in Lynch Syndrome patients
2023-09-19
(Press-News.org) HOUSTON ― Regular and intense aerobic exercise may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer in patients with Lynch Syndrome (LS) by improving the immune system's ability to detect and remove potentially harmful cells, according to researchers at
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.  

The findings, published today in Clinical Cancer Research, revealed that LS carriers participating in a high-intensity training (HIIT) regimen saw a reduction of the inflammatory marker prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in both the colon and the blood. Researchers also found higher levels of two types of immune cells, natural killer (NK) and CD8+ T cells, suggesting an increased immune response in the colon. 

“It was mind-blowing to me that exercise induced such strong and durable change,” said study lead, Eduardo Vilar-Sanchez, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Clinical Cancer Prevention. “We found that high-intensity training not only enhances how the body could fight cancer at its earliest stages, but it also gives many other health benefits.”  

LS is a hereditary condition affecting more than 1 million Americans that carries a high lifetime risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer. Men with LS have a 60%-80% risk of developing CRC, while that risk is 40%-60% for women. Women also face the same amount of chance of developing endometrial cancer.  

This non-randomized study followed 21 LS patients between the ages of 18 and 50 over a 12-month period. Eleven patients were assigned to the exercise group and 10 to receive usual care. All 21 patients were given activity trackers. The exercise group enrolled in three 45-minute HIIT cycling sessions a week, while usual care patients were only told about the benefits of working out.  

Participants in the exercise group recorded a median of 164 weekly exercise minutes at a heart rate >70%, while the usual care group recorded a median of 14 weekly exercise minutes. 

At the start of the study, both groups completed a baseline health questionnaire and underwent a standard-of-care lower gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy with biopsies and blood collection. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) was performed at the second visit, within 30 days of the primary endoscopy. All participants received a 1-year endoscopy followed by a CPET at the fourth checkup, within 30 days of the 1-year endoscopy. There were no significant adverse events.  

Expression analysis by next-generation sequencing showed statistically significant changes in gene expression in the normal colorectal mucosa between the exercise and usual care groups. In the group that exercised, 13 genes became more active, while 33 genes became less active when compared to the group that did not exercise. Activated genes were involved in immune signaling pathways, whereas suppressed genes were linked to muscle contraction and metabolism. 

Researchers also found that when the body's ability to use oxygen (VO2peak) increases, it stimulates production of myokines and cytokines, which help regulate your immune system. Exercise was also linked to lower levels of PGE2 and an increase in certain immune cells in the colon, including CD8+ T cells and CD57+ NK cells, which play important roles in cancer defense. 

“It can be difficult for patients to commit to taking a pill,” Vilar-Sanchez said. “If we are able to validate the preventive benefits of this approach in future studies, we hope to offer a ‘lifestyle prescription’ and give LS patients a new way to possibly lower their cancer risk over time." 

Future randomized clinical trials will be needed to confirm the preventive efficacy of aerobic exercise training in LS carriers and to further elucidate the possible immune-related pathways underlying any reductions in cancer risk. 

Limitations to the study included the small sample size without race heterogeneity and the non-randomized nature of the design. Participants knew their allocation before signing informed consent, which might have impacted their willingness to participate in the trial. In addition, differences in timing of collection of the specimens and storage in the freezer could have driven differences in metabolite levels. 

The study was supported by the Duncan Family Institute for Cancer Prevention and Risk Assessment, the T. Boone Pickens Fund, the National Cancer Institute (CA016672, P50 CA221707) and MD Anderson’s Moon Shots Program®. Vilar-Sanchez reports a consulting or advisory role with Janssen Research and Development, Recursion Pharma and Guardant Health. A full list of co-authors and disclosures can be found here.  

Read this press release in the MD Anderson Newsroom.

END

[Attachments] See images for this press release:
Exercise boosts anti-cancer immunity and reduces inflammation in Lynch Syndrome patients

ELSE PRESS RELEASES FROM THIS DATE:

COVID-infected adults with 4 or more underlying diseases or advanced age, face higher risk of ICU stay, death

2023-09-19
Whether vaccinated or not, having at least four disease risk factors put adults hospitalized due to COVID-19 at higher risk for critical outcomes, according to a 10-state study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) VISION Network. The study describes the characteristics of adults hospitalized with COVID-19 from June 2021 through March 2023 and enumerates their risk factors for critical outcomes, defined as intensive care unit (ICU) admission and/or in-hospital death. It ...

Novel ligands for transition-metal catalysis of photoreactions

Novel ligands for transition-metal catalysis of photoreactions
2023-09-19
Transition metals form catalytic complexes that can speed up various chemical processes, especially in the production of pharmaceuticals as well as various pigments, dyes, and laboratory reagents like sulfuric acid. The use of light emitting diodes (LEDs) has boosted the use of visible light in reaction catalysis, and scientists have developed photo-redox catalysts made of iridium and ruthenium, which facilitate catalysis when irradiated with specific wavelengths of light. Further, scientists have even demonstrated visible light photoreactions with palladium complexes without the use of photo-redox catalysts. While several such transition metal-catalyzed ...

Ability to drive a car influences quality of life of older adults in Japan

Ability to drive a car influences quality of life of older adults in Japan
2023-09-19
Physical health and cognitive function declines as we age. Aging impacts people’s ability to perform routine tasks, which affects their well-being and sense of independence. One such routine activity that is frequently affected is driving. For older adults, the inability to drive themselves can mean that they become unable to access basic needs or engage in social activities. In a recent study that was made available online on 29 August 2023 and is all set to be published in volume 176 of Transportation Research in October 2023, researchers ...

Pediatric endocrinologists concerned for safety amid divisive political climate

2023-09-19
WASHINGTON—Pediatric endocrinologists are concerned for their safety and their ability to provide evidenced-based care to transgender and gender-diverse adolescents amid political divides over gender-affirming care, according to a new paper published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society. Pediatric endocrinologists specialize in the care of children and adolescents with disorders related to hormones and the glands that produce them, such as diabetes and disorders of growth, thyroid or puberty. Some pediatric endocrinologists also provide gender-affirming care as part of their medical practice. Among youth ages 13 to 17 in the United States, 1.4% identify as transgender, ...

Team looks to plant tissues that move for inspiration in designing artificial actuators

Team looks to plant tissues that move for inspiration in designing artificial actuators
2023-09-19
Scientists are looking to plant tissues that are capable of motion to inspire the design and fabrication of artificial actuators. These bioinspired actuators hold significant potential in applications, such as soft robotics, prosthetics, and smart biomedical devices. A research team from the Chinese Academy of Sciences has published a perspective paper focusing specifically on the ways plants regulate their motion speed and how this might be applied with artificial actuators.   Their paper is published in the journal Nano Research on September 18.   These artificial actuators, that are responsive to humidity, solvents, heat, light, and electricity, ...

Treating NASH disease by removing cholesterol from macrophages using a unique supramolecule

Treating NASH disease by removing cholesterol from macrophages using a unique supramolecule
2023-09-19
A research group from the Graduate School of Medicine and Research Institute of Environmental Medicine at Nagoya University reported that cholesterol accumulation in macrophages promotes liver fibrosis in the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Using a unique supramolecule, they removed cholesterol in a mouse model, stopping the development of the disease. As cholesterol crystals are also found in human patients, this suggests a potential treatment for the disease. Their findings were published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.     As the number of patients with ...

Researchers unveil new flexible adhesive with exceptional recovery and adhesion properties for electronic devices

Researchers unveil new flexible adhesive with exceptional recovery and adhesion properties for electronic devices
2023-09-19
The rapid advancements in flexible electronic technology have led to the emergence of innovative devices such as foldable displays, wearables, e-skin, and medical devices. These breakthroughs have created a growing demand for flexible adhesives that can quickly recover their shape while effectively connecting various components in these devices. However, conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) often face challenges in achieving a balance between recovery capabilities and adhesive strength. In an extraordinary study conducted at UNIST, researchers have successfully synthesized new types of urethane-based crosslinkers that address this critical challenge. Led by Professor Dong Woog ...

Grant awarded to University of Louisville law professor will fund climate adaptation project

Grant awarded to University of Louisville law professor will fund climate adaptation project
2023-09-19
The Resilience Justice Project (RJ Project) at the University of Louisville’s Brandeis School of Law has been awarded a one-year multi-institutional grant through a national competitive process to evaluate how climate adaptation planning can be more equitable for low-income communities in eight U.S. coastal areas. The RJ Project will use the $75,000 award from the National Sea Grant Law Center through NOAA’s National Coastal Resilience Fund to examine coastal urban adaptation in the eight cities: Boston, Cleveland, Miami, New Orleans, San Diego, Savannah, Seattle and Tampa. Principal ...

Technological progress and climate change

Technological progress and climate change
2023-09-19
Technological progress can reduce the energy required to achieve the same ends, reducing the use of fossil fuels and the greenhouse gases associated with burning fossil fuels. But technological progress can also make production, consumption, and travel cheaper, stimulating demand and consequently increasing greenhouse gas emissions. Sai Liang and colleagues sought to explore this conundrum by building an environmentally extended general equilibrium model with heterogeneous agent and input-output network covering 141 nations and 65 sectors, ...

Yogurt may be the next go-to garlic breath remedy

2023-09-19
COLUMBUS, Ohio – It turns out yogurt may have a previously unknown benefit: eliminating garlic odors. A new study conducted in a lab – with follow-up human breath tests being planned – showed that whole milk plain yogurt prevented almost all of the volatile compounds responsible for garlic’s pungent scent from escaping into the air. Researchers tested the garlic deodorizing capacity of yogurt and its individual components of water, fat and protein to see how each stood up to the stink. Both fat and protein were effective at trapping garlic odors, leading the scientists to suggest high-protein ...

LAST 30 PRESS RELEASES:

Researchers expose new symbiosis origin theories, identify experimental systems for plant life

Q&A: How AI affects kids’ creativity

Virtual lab meetings improve undergraduate research experience and foster diversity in academia

Study shows effectiveness of updated COVID-19 vaccines wanes moderately over time, is lower against currently circulating variants

Researchers expose new ‘origin’ theories, identify experimental systems for plant life

Researchers honored for outstanding contributions to cancer care

A new Hungarian method may aid protein research

AIM algorithm enhances super-resolution microscope images in real time

Rice researchers uncover surprising role of opioid receptors in gut development

Cleveland Clinic and IBM researchers apply quantum computing methods to protein structure prediction

Blood flow makes waves across the surface of the mouse brain

More out-of-state patients seek abortions in Washington state

Researchers take step toward development of universal COVID-19 antibodies

Do epilepsy medications taken during pregnancy affect a child’s creativity?

First hints of memory problems associated with changes in the brain

Mass General Brigham study finds that memory complaints can predict biological changes in the brain

JPMorgan Chase, Argonne and Quantinuum show theoretical quantum speedup with the quantum approximate optimization algorithm

AI browser plug-ins to help consumers improve digital privacy literacy, combat manipulative design

Grant funds CU project to develop novel mechanism to expand NF1 treatments

A drying Salton Sea pollutes neighboring communities

Wild megalopolis: Study shows unexpected pockets of biodiversity pepper Los Angeles

Slugs and snails love the city, unlike other animals

Ideas that cross international borders may have powerful impact on elections

YouTube’s comments section: Political echo chamber or constructive cross-partisan forum?

Babies babble squeals and growls in clustering patterns observable from birth through the first year, suggesting this active vocal exploration is important to speech development

The sweat bee, H. rubicundus, is less sociable in Scotland than in Cornwall, but is genetically differentiated and genetically isolated too

Smartphone use may help adolescents feel better - at least in the moment, finds real-time survey of US teens

Public have no difficulty getting to grips with an extra thumb, study finds

Breakthrough in cancer prediction with nano informatics and AI

New immunotherapy could treat cancer in the bone

[Press-News.org] Exercise boosts anti-cancer immunity and reduces inflammation in Lynch Syndrome patients
Study shows, for the first time, biological effects of exercise on the immune system in patients at high risk for cancer