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24-Hour Johnny Cash Internet Radio Station Launches

24-Hour Johnny Cash Internet Radio Station Launches
2010-10-21
Johnny Cash fans around the world can now tune in to Johnny Cash Radio, a new venture launched by Bill Miller who, along with the late Johnny Cash, founded the official Johnny Cash website 14 years ago. The station, www.johnnycashradio.com, streams Johnny Cash music and content 24 hours a day, seven days a week. "Johnny Cash Radio is a dream come true for Johnny's millions of fans around the globe. We are the source for all things Cash, and our lineup includes programming hosted by Johnny's own family members, friends, former band members and others in the music industry," ...

New clues to how cancer-related proteins plasmin, thrombin lose inhibition

2010-10-20
RICHLAND, Wash. -- A new technique that searches blood for the tiniest remnants of broken down proteins has revealed new information about how cells crank up cancer activators called proteases. The results improve researchers' understanding of the mechanics of breast cancer and point to where to look for possible indicators of early disease. Appearing this week in PLoS ONE, the research shows previously unknown contributing factors to protease activation, which helps spread cancer: cancer cells almost completely chew up small protein pieces that normally put the brakes ...

Major component in turmeric enhances effect of chemotherapy drug in head and neck cancer

2010-10-20
Curcumin, the major component in the spice turmeric, when combined with the drug Cisplatin enhances the chemotherapy's suppression of head and neck cancer cell growth, researchers with UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center have found. A naturally occurring spice widely used in South Asian and Middle Eastern cooking, Turmeric has long been known to have medicinal properties, attributed to its anti-inflammatory effects. Previous studies have shown it can suppress the growth of certain cancers, said Dr. Marilene Wang, a professor of head and neck surgery, lead author of the study ...

From bees to coral reefs: How humans impact partnerships in the natural world

From bees to coral reefs: How humans impact partnerships in the natural world
2010-10-20
Mutually beneficial partnerships among species may play highly important but vastly underrecognized roles in keeping the Earth's ecosystems running, a group of evolutionary biologists suggests in a study. The authors present evidence that human impacts may be forcing these mutualist systems down unprecedented evolutionary paths. "With global climate change, evolutionary change can happen very rapidly, over a few years," said Judith Bronstein, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the UA's College of Science and senior author on the paper. "That can be a ...

Vitamin E in front line of prostate cancer fight

2010-10-20
Survival rates of the world's most common cancer might soon be increased with a new vitamin E treatment which could significantly reduce tumour regrowth. Queensland University of Technology (QUT) prostate cancer researchers are leading the fight against a disease which kills 3000 Australian men a year. Dr Patrick Ling, whose research will be a centrepiece of the new $354 million Translational Research Institute (TRI) when it opens in Brisbane, is leading a team of researchers who have identified a particular constituent of vitamin E, known as tocotrienol (T3), which ...

The world is not flat: Exploring cells and tissues in three dimensions

The world is not flat: Exploring cells and tissues in three dimensions
2010-10-20
The cells and tissues in our bodies grow, develop and interact in a highly complex, three-dimensional world. Likewise, the various microbial pathogens that invade our bodies and cause infectious disease interact with this complex 3-D tissue milieu. Yet the methods of culturing and studying human cells have traditionally been carried out in two dimensions on flat impermeable surfaces. While such 2-D culturing and modeling efforts have produced a steady stream of critical insight into cell behavior and the mechanisms of infection and disease, 2-D cell cultures have key limitations ...

Alcohol increases reaction time and errors during decision making

2010-10-20
There has been an abundance of research on the effects of alcohol on the brain, but many questions regarding how alcohol impairs the built-in control systems are still unknown. A new study released in the January 2011 issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, which is currently available at Early View, explores that subject in detail and found that certain brain regions involved in error processing are affected more by alcohol than others. According to Beth Anderson, a postdoctoral fellow at the Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Centre at Hartford Hospital in ...

Fetal alcohol exposure associated with a decrease in cognitive performance

2010-10-20
Exposure to alcohol as a fetus has been shown to cause difficulties in memory and information processing in children New findings indicate that visual perception, control of attention and demand processing may be involved in fetal alcohol-related learning problems This information could potentially be used to help children affected with such difficulties It has been known for many years that drinking alcohol while pregnant can cause serious and irreversible damage to the fetus. However, new research exploring memory deficits in children diagnosed with fetal alcohol ...

Heavy alcohol use suggests a change in normal cognitive development in adolescents

2010-10-20
Adolescence and puberty is a period of significant development in the brain New findings indicate that excessive alcohol use selectively damages the frontal lobe, which is responsible for the development of social skills and judgment This indicates that severe alcohol abuse may damage brain function, and the normal course of neural development in adolescents Alcohol, to an adolescent, is often seen as a rite of passage. Many teenagers view alcohol (as well as other drugs) as a gateway to adulthood, but are often blissfully unaware of the damage that it can cause ...

CYP2E1 gene found to be associated with alcohol response in the brain

2010-10-20
The gene CYP2E1, which is located on the terminal region of chromosome 10, plays a major role in the metabolic processing of alcohol New findings show that this gene is linked with a low sensitivity to alcohol and increased risk for alcoholism CYP2E1 could therefore be used as a predictor for those who are at risk for alcoholism The research into how alcohol reacts with the brain is a complex one, and has been relentlessly studied for many years. But a new study has shown, through linkage and association analysis on various family groups, that a gene originally ...

New vision correction options for baby boomers

2010-10-20
CHICAGO— Results of clinical research on new presbyopia treatments now available in Europe–and possibly available soon in the United States–were reported in today's Scientific Program of the 2010 Joint Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) and Middle East-Africa Council of Ophthalmology (MEACO). The AAO-MEACO meeting is the world's largest, most comprehensive ophthalmic education conference and is in session October 16 through 19 at McCormick Place, Chicago. Presbyopia is Inevitable, but Blurry Vision is Not From age 40 onward our eyes' lenses gradually ...

Cataract surgery saves lives, dollars by reducing auto crashes

2010-10-20
CHICAGO—Cataract surgery not only improves vision and quality of life for older people, but is also apparently a way to reduce the number of car crashes. The research will be presented today's at the Scientific Program of the 2010 American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) – Middle East-Africa Council of Ophthalmology (MEACO) Joint Meeting. Cataract surgery not only improves vision and quality of life for older people, but is also apparently a way to reduce the number of car crashes. The research will be presented today's at the Scientific Program of the 2010 American Academy ...

Photovoltaic medicine

2010-10-20
WASHINGTON, D.C., (Oct. 19, 2010) -- Micro-scaled photovoltaic devices may one day be used to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs directly to tumors, rendering chemotherapy less toxic to surrounding tissue. "In the first step, we were able to prove the concept," says Tao Xu, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the University of Texas in El Paso. Xu and his colleagues will present their findings today at the AVS 57th International Symposium & Exhibition, which takes place this week at the Albuquerque Convention Center in New Mexico. Currently, chemotherapeutic drugs are piped ...

Atomic-level manufacturing

2010-10-20
WASHINGTON, D.C., (Oct. 19, 2010) -- The long-held dream of creating atomically precise three-dimensional structures in a manufacturing environment is approaching reality, according to the top scientist at a company making tools aimed at that ambitious goal. John Randall, Vice President of Zyvex Labs in Richardson, Tex., says his researchers have demonstrated a process that uses a scanning tunneling microscope tip to remove protective surface hydrogen atoms from silicon one at a time and then adds single atomic layers of silicon only to those meticulously cleared areas. ...

Nanotube thermopower

2010-10-20
WASHINGTON, D.C., (Oct. 19, 2010) -- When weighing options for energy storage, different factors can be important, such as energy density or power density, depending on the circumstances. Generally batteries -- which store energy by separating chemicals -- are better for delivering lots of energy, while capacitors -- which store energy by separating electrical charges -- are better for delivering lots of power (energy per time). It would be nice, of course, to have both. Today at the AVS 57th International Symposium & Exhibition, which takes place this week at the Albuquerque ...

Batteries smaller than a grain of salt

2010-10-20
WASHINGTON, D.C., (Oct. 19, 2010) -- Lithium-ion batteries have become ubiquitous in today's consumer electronics -- powering our laptops, phones, and iPods. Research funded by DARPA is pushing the limits of this technology and trying to create some of the tiniest batteries on Earth, the largest of which would be no bigger than a grain of sand. These tiny energy storage devices could one day be used to power the electronics and mechanical components of tiny micro- to nano-scale devices. Jane Chang, an engineer at the University of California, Los Angeles, is designing ...

Sterilizing with fluorescent lights

2010-10-20
WASHINGTON, D.C., (Oct. 19, 2010) -- The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections is well known, causing an estimated 19,000 deaths and $3-4 billion in healthcare costs per year in the U.S. What is less well known is that this increased infection and resistance rate has not been met with a simultaneous development of novel antimicrobial and antibiotic agents; in fact, only three classes of antibiotics have been developed since the 1950s. To address this need, scientists at the University of New Mexico are working on a new type of antimicrobial ...

Disease in rural China linked to polluted coal

2010-10-20
WASHINGTON, D.C., (Oct. 19, 2010) -- In remote, rural areas of southwestern China, villagers cook and dry their clothes by burning pieces of coal they pick up off the ground. This fuel releases a toxin that may be poisoning millions of people, according to an ongoing investigation by chemists at the University at Buffalo in New York. The researchers are presenting their work today at the AVS 57th International Symposium & Exhibition, which takes place this week at the Albuquerque Convention Center in New Mexico. The toxin in question is fluoride, which binds to calcium ...

Improved antibiotic coatings

2010-10-20
WASHINGTON, D.C., (Oct. 19, 2010) -- Bacteria have a natural ability to attach themselves to surfaces, both natural and synthetic. Once attached, they often work cooperatively to form biofilms, thin layers of bacterial colonies that can coat the surface of a medical device and introduce the risk of infection. As a result, orthopedic implants, catheters, and even contact lenses can become vehicles for infection. Antibacterial materials on the surface can reduce the risk but generally these materials do not stick well to the devices. A research group at the University of ...

How batteries grow old

2010-10-20
WASHINGTON, D.C., (Oct. 19, 2010) -- In a laboratory at Ohio State University, an ongoing experiment is studying why batteries lose their ability to hold a charge as they age -- specifically lithium-ion batteries, which have generated a lot of buzz for their potential to power the electric cars of the future. Preliminary results presented today at the AVS 57th International Symposium & Exhibition, taking place this week at the Albuquerque Convention Center in New Mexico, suggest that the irreversible changes inside a dead battery start at the nanoscale. Yann Guezennec ...

How parasites react to the mouse immune system may help to shape their control

2010-10-20
How parasites use different life-history strategies to beat our immune systems may also provide insight into the control of diseases, such as elephantiasis and river blindness, which afflict some of the world's poorest communities in tropical South-East Asia, Africa and Central America. The research is due to be published next week in the online, open-access journal PLoS Biology. The study, led by Dr Simon Babayan of the University of Edinburgh, showed using a mouse model of parasite infection (for diseases such as elephantiasis) that when the parasitic worms enter the ...

First direct evidence that response to alcohol depends on genes

2010-10-20
UPTON, NY — Many studies have suggested that genetic differences make some individuals more susceptible to the addictive effects of alcohol and other drugs. Now scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory provide the first experimental evidence to directly support this idea in a study in mice reported in the October 19, 2010, issue of Alcoholism Clinical Experimental Research. The study compared the brain's response to long-term alcohol drinking in two genetic variants of mice. One strain lacked the gene for a specific brain receptor ...

Use of DHA fish oil capsules does not decrease postpartum depression in mothers

2010-10-20
In contrast to the findings of some studies and the recommendations that pregnant women increase their intake of fish oil via dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) because of the possible benefits, a randomized trial that included more than 2,000 women finds that use of DHA supplements did not result in lower levels of postpartum depression in mothers or improved cognitive and language development in their offspring during early childhood, according to a study in the October 20 issue of JAMA. "Epidemiological investigations from the United States and Europe demonstrate ...

Implementing program for operating room staff emphasizing teamwork appears to reduce surgical deaths

2010-10-20
Hospitals that had operating room personnel participate in a medical team training program that incorporates practices of aviation crews, such as training in teamwork and communication, had a lower rate of surgical deaths compared to hospitals that did not participate in the program, according to a study in the October 20 issue of JAMA. Adverse events related to surgery continue to occur despite the best efforts of clinicians, according to background information in the article. In 2006, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), the largest national integrated health ...

Hormone therapy use by postmenopausal women may increase incidence of more advanced breast cancer

2010-10-20
Follow-up of about 11 years of participants in the Women's Health Initiative finds that among postmenopausal women, use of estrogen plus progestin is associated with an increased incidence of breast cancers that are more advanced, and with a higher risk of deaths attributable to breast cancer, according to a study in the October 20 issue of JAMA. In the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) randomized, placebo-controlled trial of estrogen plus progestin, after an average intervention time of 5.6 years and an average follow-up of 7.9 years, breast cancer incidence was increased ...
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