PRESS-NEWS.org - Press Release Distribution
PRESS RELEASES DISTRIBUTION

Salon and Spa Galleria Adds Arlington Location

Salon and Spa Galleria Adds Arlington Location
2011-01-08
An old dog learns new tricks as an Arlington salon reopens its doors with a new marketing strategy for both customers and tenants. Every specialist who rents a studio at the Salon and Spa Galleria will receive a free page on the salon's search engine-optimized website. "It's more than just a profile page with a picture and contact information," says the owner of the salon. "It's a personal salon blog they can use to connect with their client bases. Every blog posting makes their page that much more optimized for Google, thus getting them that much more exposure on the ...

Didriks Announces British Cutlery Designer David Mellor Honored for Design Achievements by Modern Magazine

Didriks Announces British Cutlery Designer David Mellor Honored for Design Achievements by Modern Magazine
2011-01-08
In their Winter 2010 issue Modern Magazine spotlighted the late post-war British cutlery designer David Mellor. Mellor has been hailed "as Britain's most serious, modest and greatest postwar product designer." Mellor not only devoted his professional life to the design of exceptional contemporary flatware but also created many well-known industrial designs woven in British daily life, such as public trash bins, street lights and the modernized red post box. The full collection of David Mellor flatware is available for purchase in the United States at Didriks, in Cambridge, ...

Didriks Announces Third Annual February Campaign to Benefit Food For Free

Didriks Announces Third Annual February Campaign to Benefit Food For Free
2011-01-08
Didriks, a retailer of outdoor furniture and home furnishings, announced that they will donate five percent of in-store and online sales in February to Cambridge, MA nonprofit Food For Free.  This will be Didriks' third annual campaign to benefit Food For Free, an organization that collects and provides fresh food to the needy. Didriks invites the public to an in-store kickoff party on February 3rd, 2011, from 5-8pm. Catering for the event is provided by Season to Taste catering. Food For Free Director, David Leslie, said: "We're excited and grateful to partner with ...

iWatchz Launches Carbon and Jelly Collections at CES 2011 -- The World's #1 iPod Nano Watch Follows the Huge Success of its 'Q Collection' with the Launch of Two New Stylish Collections

2011-01-08
The Carbon Collection features a matte-black aluminum nanoclipz system and a carbon watchband accented with coloured stitching available in six colours. The Carbon Collection will be available in early February 2011 at over 250 Apple Stores nationwide, Apple.com and www.iwatchz.com at $49.95 USD. The Jelly Collection features a translucent-coloured nanoclipz system and matching vibrant silicon watchbands in pink, orange, red, green, blue, white and grey. The Jelly Collection will be available at retailers nationwide and at www.iwatchz.com in early February 2011 at the ...

IVF breakthrough to hit the world market

2011-01-07
A University of Adelaide reproductive biologist has achieved a major breakthrough in IVF technology that is expected to help millions of women around the world who have suffered previous miscarriages after IVF treatment. Professor Sarah Robertson, an NHMRC Principal Research Fellow and member of the University's Robinson Institute, has partnered with a Danish company to develop a product which improves IVF embryo implantation rates for some women by up to 40%. In the world's largest clinical trial on IVF media, Professor Robertson and ORIGIO a/s - a European company ...

Scripps Research chemist devises new method to quantify protein changes

2011-01-07
JUPITER, FL, January 5, 2011 – A scientist from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute has devised a new method of analyzing and quantifying changes in proteins that result from a common chemical process. The new findings could provide new insights into the effects of a highly destructive form of stress on proteins in various disease models, particularly cancer. The study, published January 5, 2011, in the online Early View of the journal Angewandte Chemie, was designated by the journal as a "very important paper," a distinction bestowed on less than five ...

Deaths from anesthesia during childbirth plummet

2011-01-07
AURORA, Colo. (Jan. 5, 2011) – The number of women who die from complications of anesthesia during childbirth has plummeted 59 percent over the last two decades thanks to improved monitoring and better medical techniques, according to a recent study. The report's lead researcher, Joy Hawkins, MD, professor of anesthesiology and director of Obstetric Anesthesia at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, said the risks have been dramatically reduced due to a greater focus on eliminating complications of general anesthesia. Hawkins examined 12 years of anesthesia-related ...

Ammonites' last meal: New light on past marine food chains

Ammonites last meal: New light on past marine food chains
2011-01-07
Scientists have discovered direct evidence of the diet of one of the most important group of ammonites, distant relatives of squids, octopuses and cuttlefishes. The discovery may bring a new insight on why they became extinct 65.5 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous. Ammonites are among the world's most well known fossils but until now, there has been no experimental evidence of their place in the food chain. Using synchrotron X-rays, a Franco-American team of scientists led by Isabelle Kruta has discovered exceptionally preserved mouth organs of ammonites, ...

Ammonites dined on plankton

Ammonites dined on plankton
2011-01-07
Powerful synchrotron scans of Baculites fossils found on American Museum of Natural History expeditions to the Great Plains suggests that the extinct group of marine invertebrates to which they belong, the ammonites, had jaws and teeth adapted for eating small prey floating in the water. One ammonite also provided direct evidence of a planktonic diet because it died with its last meal in its mouth—tiny larval snails and crustacean bits. The detailed description of internal structure of ammonites, published by a Franco-American research team this week in Science, also provides ...

Spinning the unspinnable: Using biscrolling technology invented at UT Dallas

2011-01-07
Nanotechnologists at The University of Texas at Dallas have invented a broadly deployable technology for producing weavable, knittable, sewable, and knottable yarns containing up to 95 weight percent of otherwise unspinnable guest powders and nanofibers. A minute amount of host carbon nanotube web, which can be lighter than air and stronger pound-per-pound than steel, confines guest particulates in the corridors of highly conducting scrolls without interfering with guest functionality for such applications as energy storage, energy conversion, and energy harvesting. Using ...

When it's cool, female butterflies chase males in sex role reversal

When its cool, female butterflies chase males in sex role reversal
2011-01-07
If you want to be surrounded by females on the prowl, it pays to be cool, at least if you are a male butterfly. In an unusual example of sex role reversals, females actively court males after being exposed to cool, dry temperatures as caterpillars, Yale University researchers report in the Jan. 7 issue of the journal Science. Raised in the moist and warmer season as larvae, males take up the traditional roles of suitor, displaying their wing designs to females who do the choosing. "Behavior in these butterflies is changed by the temperatures experienced during development," ...

Cancer in a single catastrophe

2011-01-07
Most of the time cancer seems to creep up gradually over time; cells become premalignant, then increasingly abnormal before they become cancerous. But sometimes cancers seem to pop up as if out of nowhere. Now, researchers reporting in the January 7th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication, have new evidence to explain how that can happen. Based on the DNA sequences of multiple cancer samples of various types, they show that cancer can arise suddenly in the aftermath of one-off cellular crises involving tens to hundreds of genomic rearrangements. "We think ...

A blood test for Alzheimer's disease?

2011-01-07
Using a new technology that relies on thousands of synthetic molecules to fish for disease-specific antibodies, researchers have developed a potential method for detecting Alzheimer's disease with a simple blood test. The same methodology might lead to blood tests for many important diseases, according to the report in the January 7th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication. "If this works in Alzheimer's disease, it suggests it is a pretty general platform that may work for a lot of different diseases," said Thomas Kodadek of The Scripps Research Institute. ...

It's complicated: Despite the challenges, collaboration is key in kidney disease care

2011-01-07
Most primary care physicians (PCPs) and kidney specialists favor collaborative care for a patient with progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD), but their preferences on how and when to collaborate differ, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society Nephrology (CJASN). PCPs and kidney specialists need to partner more effectively to optimize care for patients with CKD. Prompt referral of patients to kidney specialists can slow CKD progression or help patients prepare for dialysis or kidney transplantation in a timely ...

Plasma jets are prime suspect in solar mystery

2011-01-07
BOULDER—One of the most enduring mysteries in solar physics is why the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona, is millions of degrees hotter than its surface. Now scientists believe they have discovered a major source of hot gas that replenishes the corona: narrow jets of plasma, known as spicules, shooting up from just above the Sun's surface. The finding addresses a fundamental question in astrophysics: how energy moves from the Sun's interior to create its hot outer atmosphere. "It's always been quite a puzzle to figure out why the Sun's atmosphere is hotter than its surface," ...

When less is more: How mitochondrial signals extend lifespan

When less is more: How mitochondrial signals extend lifespan
2011-01-07
LA JOLLA, CA-In making your pro-longevity resolutions, like drinking more red wine and maintaining a vibrant social network, here's one you likely forgot: dialing down your mitochondria. It turns out that slowing the engines of these tiny cellular factories could extend your life-an observation relevant not only to aging research but to our understanding of how cells communicate with each another. So report researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in the Jan. 7, 2011, issue of Cell. Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator Andrew Dillin, Ph.D., and ...

Researchers visualize herpes virus' tactical maneuver

2011-01-07
For the first time, researchers have developed a 3D picture of a herpes virus protein interacting with a key part of the human cellular machinery, enhancing our understanding of how it hijacks human cells to spread infection and opening up new possibilities for stepping in to prevent or treat infection. This discovery uncovers one of the many tactical manoeuvres employed by the virus. The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)-funded team, led by The University of Manchester, have used NMR - a technique related to the one used in MRI body scanners ...

Stem cell discovery could lead to improved bone marrow transplants

2011-01-07
SANTA CRUZ, CA--Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, have identified a key molecule for establishing blood stem cells in their niche within the bone marrow. The findings, reported in the January issue of Cell Stem Cell, may lead to improvements in the safety and efficiency of bone marrow transplants. Bone marrow transplants are a type of stem cell therapy used to treat cancers such as lymphoma and leukemia and other blood-related diseases. In a bone marrow transplant, the "active ingredients" are hematopoietic stem cells, which live in the bone marrow ...

Steering cancer inflammation to inhibit tumor growth and spread

2011-01-07
Most cancer tissues are invaded by inflammatory cells that either stimulate or inhibit the growth of the tumor, depending on what immune cells are involved. Now a Swedish-Belgian research team has shown that a protein that naturally occurs in the body, HRG, inhibits tumor growth and metastasis into secondary organs by activating specific immune cells. The study is being published today in the Net edition of the prestigious journal Cancer Cell. - Our study shows that the regulation of tumor-associated inflammation can be utilized to treat cancer and that there is a great ...

'Timing is everything' in ensuring healthy brain development

2011-01-07
Work published today shows that brain cells need to create links early on in their existence, when they are physically close together, to ensure successful connections across the brain throughout life. In people, these long-distance connections enable the left and right side of the brain to communicate and integrate different kinds of information such as sound and vision. A change in the number of these connections has been found in many developmental brain disorders including autism, epilepsy and schizophrenia. The Newcastle University researchers Dr Marcus Kaiser ...

Punctuated evolution in cancer genomes

2011-01-07
Remarkable new research overthrows the conventional view that cancer always develops in a steady, stepwise progression. It shows that in some cancers, the genome can be shattered into hundreds of fragments in a single cellular catastrophe, wreaking mutation on a massive scale. The scars of this chromosomal crisis are seen in cases from across all the common cancer types, accounting for at least one in forty of all cancers. The phenomenon is particularly common in bone cancers, where the distinctively ravaged genome is seen in up to one in four cases. The team looked ...

New study reveals impact of eating disorders on Native-Americans

2011-01-07
Scientists in Connecticut have carried out one of the first psychological studies into eating disorders in Native American (NA) populations. The research, published in The International Journal of Eating Disorders, provides new insights into the extent to which Native American populations experience eating disorders, revealing that women are more likely to report behavioral symptoms then men, while challenging views that NA men and ethnically white men will experience different psychological symptoms. The team, led by Professor Ruth Striegel-Moore from Wesleyan University ...

Scripps Research scientists develop groundbreaking technology to detect Alzheimer's disease

2011-01-07
JUPITER, FL, January 5, 2011 – Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute, have developed a novel technology that is able to detect the presence of immune molecules specific to Alzheimer's disease in patients' blood samples. While still preliminary, the findings offer clear proof that this breakthrough technology could be used in the development of biomarkers for a range of human diseases. The study, led by Scripps Research Professor Thomas Kodadek, Ph.D., was published in the January 7, 2011 edition of the journal Cell. Traditionally, antigens—a ...

Genetic abnormalities identified in pluripotent stem cell lines

2011-01-07
A multinational team of researchers led by stem cell scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Scripps Research Institute has documented specific genetic abnormalities that occur in human embryonic (hESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines. Their study, "Dynamic changes in the copy number of pluripotency and cell proliferation genes in human ESCs and iPSCs during reprogramming and time in culture" will be published in the January 7 issue of the journal Cell Stem Cell. The published findings highlight the need for frequent ...

Neural stem cells maintain high levels of reactive oxygen species, UCLA study finds

2011-01-07
For years, the majority of research on reactive oxygen species (ROS) – ions or very small molecules that include free radicals – has focused on how they damage cell structure and their potential link to stroke, cardiovascular disease and other illnesses. However, researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have shown for the first time that neural stem cells, the cells that give rise to neurons, maintain high levels of ROS to help regulate normal self-renewal and differentiation. The findings, published in the Jan. ...
Previous
Site 6767 from 7484
Next
[1] ... [6759] [6760] [6761] [6762] [6763] [6764] [6765] [6766] 6767 [6768] [6769] [6770] [6771] [6772] [6773] [6774] [6775] ... [7484]

Press-News.org - Free Press Release Distribution service.