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Decomposing 'refrigerants', a potent greenhouse gas, using industrial waste

Decomposing refrigerants, a potent greenhouse gas, using industrial waste
2024-07-22
A technology has been developed to decompose refrigerants, a greenhouse gas 1,300 times more potent than carbon dioxide, using challenging-to-handle industrial waste. Dr. Ryi, Shin-kun’s research team at the Hydrogen Convergence Materials Lab of the Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER) has successfully developed a catalyst from industrial waste known as 'red mud,' a byproduct of aluminum production. This catalyst can decompose HFC-134a refrigerant, commonly used in household appliances like air conditioners and refrigerators, with an efficiency of 99%. * Red Mud: An industrial byproduct remaining after extracting aluminum ...

UVM taps Tim Rademacher to lead research at Proctor Maple Research Center

UVM taps Tim Rademacher to lead research at Proctor Maple Research Center
2024-07-22
Tim Rademacher is taking on a sweet new role at the University of Vermont—as the new Scientific Director of UVM’s Proctor Maple Research Center (PMRC). The PMRC is a field research station of the Department of Plant Biology at the University of Vermont, and is the oldest and most renowned maple science research centers in the world. Since 1947 it has produced cutting edge research on maple, supported maple sugar producers, and bolstered maple syrup production in Vermont—and globally. “I'm very excited to join PMRC with its rich history and its excellent work that has really pushed the industry in the past, says Rademacher, who will start this fall. “I ...

Foldable pouch actuator improves finger extension in soft rehabilitation gloves

Foldable pouch actuator improves finger extension in soft rehabilitation gloves
2024-07-22
Soft rehabilitation gloves have become popular tools for helping patients with hand function-related disabilities recover finger movement. These gloves often use soft pneumatic actuators that employ air pressure to generate movements. Despite significant design improvements in recent years, many available soft actuators have drawbacks in achieving bidirectional motion typical of finger joints—such soft actuators facilitate finger bending (or flexion) but not finger straightening (or extension).   A group of biomedical researchers from Chiba University successfully ...

Male elephants signal ‘let’s go’ with deep rumbles

2024-07-22
The bull elephants gather in the evening coolness to drink. After a spell, a senior male lifts his head and turns from the waterhole. With ears flapping gently, he lets out a deep, resonant rumble.  One by one, the others respond, their voices overlapping in a sonorous, infrasonic chorus that whispers across the savanna. This elephant barbershop quartet conveys a clear message: It’s time to move on. Gradually, the elephants shift, their massive bodies swaying as they follow their rumbling leader to the next stop on their nocturnal wanderings. For the first time, scientists from Stanford University and other institutions have documented male elephants using “let’s ...

Submarine canyons are crucial for the instability of the Antarctic ice sheet

2024-07-22
Submarine canyons are crucial for the instability of the Antarctic ice sheet Antarctic canyons play a crucial role in the instability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, as they facilitate the transfer of relatively warm water (Circumpolar Deep Water) from the abyssal areas to the continental shelf and from there to the base of the ice sheet, thus contributing to its melting.  The new study, conducted by an international team of researchers led by the National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics (OGS) and including the University of Southampton, ...

People in their 50s are at higher amputation risk than older people after leg surgery

2024-07-22
Research Highlights: Adults in their 50s with peripheral artery disease or PAD — are more likely than adults older than 80 to undergo leg amputation one to five years after an emergency surgery to restore blood flow to the lower limbs. This study analyzes outcomes among patients older than age 50 hospitalized with PAD, as noted in eight years of data collected in England. Researchers say early diagnosis, risk factor modification and treatment are warranted to help prevent patients from developing severe forms of PAD. Embargoed until 4 a.m. CT/5 a.m. ET Monday, July 22, 2024 DALLAS, ...

Exposing dengue’s invasion strategies

Exposing dengue’s invasion strategies
2024-07-22
KANSAS CITY, MO—July 22, 2024—Mosquito-borne viral infections once confined to tropical regions are spreading. Dengue virus infects up to 400 million people worldwide each year according to World Health Organization estimates, and no available treatments exist for this disease. Now, research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research has uncovered surprising strategies for how dengue and hundreds of other viruses replicate in their hosts, with the potential to aid in developing novel antiviral treatments and vaccines. Led by Stowers Predoctoral Researcher Luciana ...

Under embargo: Smell of human stress affects dogs’ emotions leading them to make more pessimistic choices

Under embargo: Smell of human stress affects dogs’ emotions leading them to make more pessimistic choices
2024-07-22
Peer reviewed: Yes Type of evidence: Observational study Subject: Animals   UNDER STRICT EMBARGO until 10:00 hours [UK BST] / 05:00 hours [US EDT] Monday 22 July 2024 Smell of human stress affects dogs’ emotions leading them to make more pessimistic choices Dogs experience emotional contagion from the smell of human stress, leading them to make more ‘pessimistic’ choices, new research finds.  The University of Bristol-led study, published in Scientific Reports today [22 July], is the first to test how human stress odours affect dogs' learning and emotional state.   Evidence in humans suggests that the smell of a stressed ...

Blood proteins predict the risk of developing more than 60 diseases

2024-07-22
Research on thousands of proteins measured from a drop of blood demonstrates the ability of proteins to predict the onset of many diverse diseases. The research, published today (22 July 2024) in Nature Medicine, was carried out as part of an international research partnership between GSK, Queen Mary University of London, University College London, Cambridge University and the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité Universitätsmedizin, Germany. The researchers used data from the UK Biobank Pharma Proteomics Project (UKB-PPP), ...

Virginia Tech researchers find potential method to control mosquito populations through genetic breeding

Virginia Tech researchers find potential method to control mosquito populations through genetic breeding
2024-07-22
Virginia Tech researchers have found a new way to identify genetic targets useful for control of mosquito populations, potentially offering an alternative to insecticides. Their study, published today in Communications Biology, focused on the genetic basis of species incompatibility. They crossed Ae. aegypti, a major global arboviral disease vector, and its sibling species, Ae. mascarensis, from the Indian Ocean. When offspring is crossed back with one parent, about 10 percent of the progeny becomes intersex and is unable to reproduce. The researchers identified abnormalities in the sex determination pathways of these ...

Amsterdam UMC set to lead large-scale European study into preventing burnout due to stress among staff in and around the operating theatre

2024-07-22
On average, healthcare professionals involved in surgical procedures and care in hospitals experience more stress and burnout than other professional groups in Europe. An estimated 60% of these caregivers are showing symptoms of burnout, while up to half of nurses are considering leaving their profession. To address this, thanks to a Horizon Grant of almost 6.5 million euros, Amsterdam UMC will lead a European consortium in search of the best solutions to stress.  "Healthcare providers involved in surgical procedures are under enormous pressure. Think of surgeons, nurses, theatre assistants, anesthesiologists. They ...

National Poll: Some parents not confident their kids are wearing the right shoes

National Poll: Some parents not confident their kids are wearing the right shoes
2024-07-22
ANN ARBOR, Mich. –  As children grow, it may feel like they’re constantly outgrowing one clothing item essential for so many activities: their shoes. But many parents in a new national poll acknowledge a lack of confidence in ensuring their children are wearing properly fitting shoes – which experts say is necessary to support growth and prevent injuries. One in seven parents also say they’ve had concerns about their child’s feet or the way they walk while one in 10 parents report their child ...

Eco-friendly treatment saves squid eggs from newfound parasite

Eco-friendly treatment saves squid eggs from newfound parasite
2024-07-22
Raising squid in aquaculture has been a challenge that researchers have tried to address for many decades without meaningful success. Squid are highly sensitive to changes in water flow, are vulnerable to disease, have complex life cycles and hard-to-meet food preferences, and can become aggressive towards each other, all of which make them difficult to rear. At the same time, the population of wild squid is plummeting due to overfishing and climate change, and in Japan alone, it’s estimated ...

Quit Googling and take naps to cut dementia risk, says AI expert

2024-07-22
People can reduce their risk of age-related dementia by exercising their brains properly instead of Googling, according to a leading Canadian academic. Professor Mohamed I. Elmasry says simple daily habits such as afternoon naps, memory ‘workouts’ and not reaching for a smartphone can increase the odds of healthy aging. His new book, iMind: Artificial and Real Intelligence (with foreword by Canadian cell biologist Dr. Aileen Burford-Mason), says the focus has shifted too far away from RI (natural, or real) intelligence in favor of ...

Duke-NUS launches LIVE Ventures, a S$20 million incubator to accelerate research commercialisation

2024-07-22
New incubator aims to tap industry experts to bridge the knowledge and funding gap to enhance bench-to-bedside success LIVE Ventures provides up to $500,000 for high-potential academic research projects   Duke-NUS Medical School today launched LIVE Ventures, a S$20 million incubation programme designed to catalyse the commercialisation of innovative academic research. Focused on translating scientific breakthroughs into clinical applications, LIVE Ventures will provide Duke-NUS scientists conducting ...

Samuel Pepys’ fashion prints reveal his guilty pleasure: Fancy French clothes

Samuel Pepys’ fashion prints reveal his guilty pleasure: Fancy French clothes
2024-07-22
University of Cambridge media release UNDER STRICT EMBARGO UNTIL 00:01AM (UK TIME) ON MONDAY 22ND JULY 2024   A collection of French fashion engravings offers precious new insights into the life of Samuel Pepys years after his premature final diary entry. The prints show the tailor’s son remained fascinated by the power of fashion long after he had secured wealth and status. But they also expose Pepys’ internal conflict over French style. Most of what we know about Samuel ...

New genetic test will eliminate a form of inherited blindness in dogs

New genetic test will eliminate a form of inherited blindness in dogs
2024-07-22
Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is a group of inherited diseases that causes progressive degeneration of the light sensitive cells at the back of the eye. Dogs with PRA have normal sight at birth, but by the age of four or five they will be totally blind. There is no treatment. Now a team led by the University of Cambridge has identified the genetic mutation that causes PRA in English Shepherd Dogs, and developed a DNA test for it. By identifying dogs carrying the disease before their eyesight starts to fail, this provides a tool to guide breeding decisions so the disease is not passed on to puppies. Owners usually don’t realise their dog has PRA until it is ...

Cancer risk: Most Australian welders exposed to high levels of dangerous fumes

2024-07-21
New Curtin University research has revealed at least 46,000 Australian welders are exposed to high levels of dangerous, potentially cancer-causing fumes at work — and little is being done to protect them.   A joint Curtin School of Population Health and University of Sydney project funded through the Centre for Work Health and Safety, the Australian-first study was published today in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health.   The research team surveyed 634 workers and employers involved in welding from across Australia ...

Two-in-one mapping of temperature and flow around microscale convective flows

Two-in-one mapping of temperature and flow around microscale convective flows
2024-07-20
Tokyo, Japan – Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have devised a way to measure both the temperature and velocity profiles of fluid in a convective plume at millimeter length scales in 3D. They combined near-infrared absorption imaging and image processing to separate the motion of tracer particles from snapshots of how light is absorbed, producing both a smooth velocity and temperature map. The technology promises new insights into optimizing the design of micro-heating and cooling devices.   Accurate maps of how heat and matter flow at the microscale are vital to the design of micro-heating and cooling devices. A classic example ...

Texas A&M engineers explore intelligence augmentation to improve safety

2024-07-20
Artificial intelligence (AI) has grown rapidly in the last few years, and with that increase, industries have been able to automate and improve their efficiency in operations. A feature article published in AIChE Journal identifies the challenges and benefits of using Intelligence Augmentation (IA) in process safety systems. Contributors to this work are Dr. Faisal Khan, professor and chemical engineering department head at Texas A&M University, Dr. Stratos Pistikopoulos, professor and director of the Energy Institute, Drs. Rajeevan Arunthavanathan, Tanjin Amin, and Zaman Sajid from the Mary Kay O’Connor Safety Center. Additionally, Dr. Yuhe ...

ORNL economist honored at international hydropower conference

ORNL economist honored at international hydropower conference
2024-07-19
Researcher Rocio Uria-Martinez was named one of four “Women with Hydro Vision” at this year’s  HYDROVISION International 2024 conference taking place in Denver this week. Awarded by a committee of industry peers, the honor recognizes women who use their unique talents and vision to improve and advance the worldwide hydropower industry.  Uria is an energy and environmental economist and senior R&D staff member at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge ...

UCLA selected by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to test Medicare dementia care model

2024-07-19
UCLA has been selected by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to participate in a new Medicare alternative payment model designed to support people living with dementia and their caregivers. UCLA is one of almost 400 participants building Dementia Care Programs (DCPs) across the country working under CMS’ Guiding an Improved Dementia Experience (GUIDE) Model  to increase care coordination and improve access to services and supports, including respite care, for people living ...

Fish adjust reproduction in response to predators

Fish adjust reproduction in response to predators
2024-07-19
Some species of fish can evolve their egg-laying habits in response to predators in the area in order to survive, according to new research from The University of Texas at Arlington. It has long been observed that organisms modify their traits, including reproductive patterns, in response to changes in their environment. This type of evolutionary plasticity has been observed in many types of animals in different habitats and with varying predators. “We knew that fish who laid their eggs externally often adapted depending on the predators in the area, but we did not know how quickly species could change to these externals pressures,” said biology Professor Matthew Walsh, ...

DDX41 and its unique contribution to myeloid leukemogenesis

DDX41 and its unique contribution to myeloid leukemogenesis
2024-07-19
“[...] myeloid neoplasms associated with DDX41 variants likely exhibit a unique pathogenesis that diverges from the conventional understanding of myeloid neoplasms.” BUFFALO, NY- July 19, 2024 – A new editorial paper was published in Oncotarget's Volume 15 on July 2, 2024, entitled, “DDX41 and its unique contribution to myeloid leukemogenesis.” In this new editorial, researcher Hirotaka Matsui from the National Cancer Center Hospital in Tokyo, Japan, and Kumamoto University discusses myeloid neoplasms. Until ...

Digital games on vaping devices could lure more youth to nicotine addiction

2024-07-19
RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- In an “Industry Watch” research paper in the journal Tobacco Control, two scientists at the University of California, Riverside, raise the alarm on new electronic cigarette products equipped with touch screens, animated displays, and built-in games. Because the products are user friendly and attractive to youth, they may couple nicotine addiction with gaming disorder, the researchers caution. Of particular concern to the researchers is that coupling nicotine to existing youth behaviors, such as video gaming and screen time use, could broaden the smart electronic cigarette market to include youth with no prior interest in nicotine products, while ...
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