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RUDN University chemists obtained an unusual planar nickel complex exhibiting magnetic properties

RUDN University chemists obtained an unusual planar nickel complex exhibiting magnetic properties
2021-07-15
RUDN University chemists obtained a metal-containing complex with an unusual planar architecture. The unexpected structure was formed due to the spontaneous fixation of carbon dioxide from the air during the reaction. This compound exhibits unusual magnetic properties (spin glass behaviour). This can be useful for creating memory storage devices. The results are published in the Journal of Organometallic Chemistry Coordination polymers are hybrid crystalline coordination compounds contained of infinitely repeating fragments (structural elements). These structural ...

Researcher creates cell lines to help treat mitochondrial diseases in children

Researcher creates cell lines to help treat mitochondrial diseases in children
2021-07-15
The mitochondrion has garnered quite the reputation for its role as the "powerhouse of the cell." These tiny, but mighty organelles play various life-sustaining roles, from powering our own cells and organs to fueling chemical and biological processes. But when they aren't working properly, a number of rare diseases can occur. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of debilitating genetic disorders that affect one in 5,000 people throughout the world, most of them being children. Along with these diseases come a variety of health concerns including, but not limited to, heart ...

Digital assistants created for e-commerce which adapt themselves to each shop's needs

2021-07-15
The pandemic has taught us that almost all companies have to sell on the internet. Bots are a technology that facilitates e-commerce. They are digital assistants that can answer customer queries about products that are sold or help to locate them, as well as supporting customers in the purchasing process. "In whatever language; and moreover, chatbots never get tired: They're available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year", said Jordi Cabot, the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) researcher who created Xatkit, a company specialized in their development. This technology has existed for some time in big companies and is now also helping improve the digital competitiveness ...

RUDN University chemists propose a one-step synthesis of substances for medicine

RUDN University chemists propose a one-step synthesis of substances for medicine
2021-07-15
The RUDN University chemists have discovered a reaction for the synthesis of acetimidamides, heterocyclic compounds with biological activity that can be used for the synthesis of hormones, anti-inflammatory and other medical drugs. The reaction goes in one step with an efficiency of up to 96%. The results are published in the journal Molecules. Traditional chemical synthesis goes in several stages and requires the isolation and purification of intermediates at each stage. It is not efficient and not environmentally friendly as it increases the loss of substances and the consumption of solvents, and there is a problem of waste disposal. ...

Bioengineering discovery paves way for improved production of bio-based goods

Bioengineering discovery paves way for improved production of bio-based goods
2021-07-15
Scientists have uncovered a way to control many genes in engineered yeast cells, opening the door to more efficient and sustainable production of bio-based products. The study, published in Nucleic Acids Research by researchers from DSM's Rosalind Franklin Biotechnology Center in Delft, the Netherlands, and the University of Bristol, has shown how to unlock CRISPR's potential for regulating many genes simultaneously. Baker's yeast, or Saccharomyces cerevisiae to give it it's full name, is considered as a workhorse for biotechnology. Not only has it been used for producing bread and beer for thousands of years, but today it can also be engineered to produce an array of other useful compounds that form the basis of pharmaceuticals, fuels, and food additives. However, achieving ...

Tracking COVID-19 across Europe

Tracking COVID-19 across Europe
2021-07-15
According to the World Health Organization, a third wave of COVID infections is now all but inevitable in Europe. A COVID tracker developed by IIASA researcher Asjad Naqvi, aims to identify, collect, and collate various official regional datasets for European countries, while also combining and homogenizing the data to help researchers and policymakers explore how the virus spreads. While many comparisons have been made between the COVID-19 pandemic and similar events in history, one thing sets this pandemic apart from others: the unprecedented amount of knowledge and data that is constantly being generated to understand how the pandemic is unfolding. For a high-income region like Europe, the quality of information made available on a daily basis is exceptionally ...

ComCor study on SARS-CoV-2: where are French people catching the virus?

2021-07-15
The Institut Pasteur, in partnership with the French National Health Insurance Fund (CNAM), Santé publique France and the Ipsos Social Research Institute, recently presented the results of the ComCor epidemiological study on circumstances and places of infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The aim of the study was to identify the socio-demographic factors, places visited and behaviors associated with a higher risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2. The study contains two parts: the first part describes the circumstances of infection of index cases diagnosed positive for SARS-CoV-2 during the curfew period, especially when the person considered as the source of infection is known; the ...

Caring for the physical health of those with mental illness

2021-07-15
PHILADELPHIA - People who struggle with serious mental illnesses are more likely to die early - about 10 to 30 years early - than those without mental illness from any cause. Many factors contribute to this disparity including poor access to care, undetected health conditions and difficulty managing chronic health conditions. Addressing physical illness in those with serious mental illness has been a major challenge. To address this, researchers tested a peer-led intervention called the Bridge that helps patients with mental illness prioritize their health, access health care and develop skills to self-manage their health. The approach showed a 50% reduction in emergency room use for those in ...

World-first finding offers hope for psychosis sufferers

2021-07-15
University of Otago scientists have opened the door to improved treatment of brain dysfunction which causes psychosis. Dr Ryan Ward, of the Department of Psychology, says he and a team of researchers have been working on ways to model schizophrenia symptoms in animal models. "Psychosis is a debilitating aspect of schizophrenia and, while current drugs treat it well, they have horrendous side effects which lead to poor quality of life for patients. Research which can identify specific mechanisms of the dysfunction can provide more precise drug targets for treatment, improving patient ...

Study shows diet causes 84% drop in troublesome menopausal symptoms--without drugs

2021-07-15
WASHINGTON--A new study, published by the North American Menopause Society in the journal Menopause, found a plant-based diet rich in soy reduces moderate-to-severe hot flashes by 84%, from nearly five per day to fewer than one per day. During the 12-week study, nearly 60% of women became totally free of moderate-to-severe hot flashes. Overall hot flashes (including mild ones) decreased by 79%. The study, called the WAVS trial--the Women's Study for the Alleviation of Vasomotor Symptoms-shows that diet changes can be much more powerful for treating ...

A new avenue for fighting drug-resistant bacteria

A new avenue for fighting drug-resistant bacteria
2021-07-15
A small regulatory RNA found in many problematic bacteria, including Escherichia coli, appears to be responsible for managing the response of these bacteria to environmental stresses. Professor END ...

Thinking without a brain

2021-07-15
If you didn't have a brain, could you still figure out where you were and navigate your surroundings? Thanks to new research on slime molds, the answer may be "yes." Scientists from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and the Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University have discovered that a brainless slime mold called Physarum polycephalum uses its body to sense mechanical cues in its surrounding environment, and performs computations similar to what we call "thinking" to decide in which direction to grow based on that information. Unlike previous studies with Physarum, these results were obtained without giving ...

Comprehensive primary care is vital to holistic care and optimal recovery after a stroke

2021-07-15
DALLAS, July 15, 2021 -- Statement Highlights: The new scientific statement, "Primary Care of Adult Patients After Stroke," acknowledges the importance of primary care in the system of care for patients with stroke, summarizing the available literature and providing a roadmap for holistic, goal-directed and patient-centered care. The statement is published today in Stroke, a journal of the American Stroke Association, a division of the American Heart Association. Primary care professionals provide essential comprehensive and consistent care to patients ...

Removing the lead hazard from perovskite solar cells

Removing the lead hazard from perovskite solar cells
2021-07-15
"The solar energy-to-electricity conversion of perovskite solar cells is unbelievably high, around 25%, which is now approaching the performance of the best silicon solar cells," says Professor László Forró at EPFL's School of Basic Sciences. "But their central element is lead, which is a poison; if the solar panel fails, it can wash out into the soil, get into the food chain, and cause serious diseases." The problem is that in most of the halide perovskites lead can dissolve in water. This water solubility and solubility in other solvents is actually a great advantage, as it makes building perovskite solar panels simpler and inexpensive - another perk along with their ...

Identification of over 200 long COVID symptoms prompts call for UK screening programme

2021-07-15
Patients who experience long COVID have reported more than 200 symptoms across 10 organ systems*, in the largest international study of 'long-haulers' to date, led by UCL scientists together with a patient-led research collaborative. For the study, published in the Lancet's EClinicalMedicine, patient researchers who connected through the Body Politic online COVID-19 support group created a web-based survey designed to characterise the symptom profile and time course in patients with confirmed or suspected long COVID, along with the impact on daily life, work, and return to health. With responses from 3,762 ...

Pandemic of antibiotic resistance is killing children in Bangladesh

2021-07-15
BOSTON - Resistance to antibiotics is common and often deadly among children with pneumonia in Bangladesh, according to a new study coauthored by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) with colleagues at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (abbreviated as icddr,b). This study, which appears in the journal Open Forum Infectious Diseases, offers an early warning that a pandemic of potentially deadly antibiotic resistance is under way and could spread around the globe. The study was led by Mohammod Jobayer Chisti, MD, PhD, a senior scientist in icddr,b's Nutrition ...

Teens with secure family relationships "pay it forward" with empathy for friends

2021-07-15
Teens' ability to empathize -- to understand others' perspectives and emotions, and to care for their wellbeing -- is an important contributor to their relationships, including with friends. Prior research shows that teens who have more secure family relationships report higher levels of empathy for others. But little research examines whether teens with more secure family relationships actually show greater empathy when observed in real-life interactions with peers, or whether their empathic capacities show different patterns of growth over time. A new study tested whether ...

Evaluating peers' food choices may improve healthy eating habits among young adolescents

2021-07-15
According to the World Health Organization, over 340 million children and adolescents (aged 5 to 10 years old) were classified as overweight or obese in 2016, a statistic that has risen from 14% since 1975. Childhood obesity is associated with a wide range of severe health complications and an increased risk of premature onset of illnesses, including diabetes and heart disease. Without intervention, children and young adolescents classified as obese are likely to remain so throughout adolescence and adulthood. A new study conducted in the United Arab Emirates investigates whether asking early adolescents to evaluate the food choices of peers triggers deliberative thinking that improves their own food selection, even when the peers' ...

Heart problems resolve in majority of kids with COVID inflammatory syndrome

2021-07-15
NEW YORK, NY (July 15, 2021)--Heart problems in children hospitalized with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C)--an inflammatory condition triggered by COVID--were mostly gone within a few months, a new study by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and NewYork-Presbyterian has found. The study published in Pediatrics about 45 MIS-C patients is the first in North America to report on longitudinal cardiac and immunologic outcomes in children hospitalized with MIS-C. "We've learned that COVID causes a spectrum of illness in children. Some are asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and a small number of kids who develop MIS-C become critically ill, requiring ...

Extraordinary carbon emissions from El Nino-induced biomass burning estimated using Japanese aircraft and shipboard observations in Equatorial Asia

2021-07-15
Equatorial Asia, which includes Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, and surrounding areas, experienced devastating biomass burning in 2015 due to the severe drought condition induced by the extreme El Niño and a positive anomaly of the Indian Ocean dipole. This biomass burning emitted a significant amount of carbon, mainly in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2), into the atmosphere. Equatorial Asia has very few ground-based stations that observe CO2 and other related atmospheric constitutents. Meanwhile, a few satellites could observe atmospheric CO2; however, their observations were less available ...

Stakeholders' sentiment can make or break a new CEO

Stakeholders sentiment can make or break a new CEO
2021-07-15
When a CEO steps down or is dismissed, the attention of the board is on how to choose the right executive to succeed that CEO. However, Bocconi University professor Dovev Lavie claims that managing the process of introducing the new CEO and choking the negative sentiment that can arise among stakeholders in a moment of uncertainty could be a more critical task, especially when the new CEO comes from outside the firm. The effect of such a negative sentiment, which is a form of psychological bias, on a firm's performance is stronger than the implications of the new CEO's previous experience ...

Pandemic layoffs pushed hospitality workers to leave industry

2021-07-15
VANCOUVER, Wash. - The psychological toll of losing a job due to COVID-19 caused many young hotel and restaurant workers to consider changing careers, according to a Washington State University study. In the study, the laid-off and fully furloughed hospitality employees reported being financially strained, depressed, socially isolated and panic stricken over the pandemic's effects, leading to increased intention to leave the industry all together. The intention to leave was particularly strong among women and younger workers. "It's a warning sign for my industry that the younger generation was really hit hard," said Chun-Chu Chen, an assistant ...

People with learning disabilities 'extremely vulnerable' to the effects of COVID-19

2021-07-15
People with learning disabilities with covid-19 are five times more likely to be admitted to hospital and eight times more likely to die compared with the general population of England, finds a study published by The BMJ today. Risks were particularly high for those with severe to profound learning disability, Down's syndrome and cerebral palsy. The researchers say prompt access to covid-19 testing and healthcare is warranted for this group, and prioritisation for covid-19 vaccination and other targeted preventive measures should be considered. Emerging evidence has shown that people with learning ...

New study suggests benefit-to-harm balance of statins for healthy adults 'generally favorable'

2021-07-15
Statins are associated with a small increased risk of side effects in patients without a history of heart disease, but these effects are mild compared with the potential benefits of treatment in preventing major cardiovascular events, say researchers in The BMJ today. They say their findings suggest that the benefit-to-harm balance of statins for adults without heart disease is generally favourable. Statins are widely used to prevent heart disease, and severe side effects are rare, but many people are reluctant to take them because of the potential for milder effects such as muscle weakness and stiffness. For people with existing heart disease, the benefits of statins far outweigh the risk of these effects, but when statins are used by people without a history of heart ...

Ultra-processed food linked to higher risk of IBD

2021-07-15
Ultra-processed food linked to higher risk of IBD Further studies needed to identify contributory factors in processed foods that might account for these associations A higher intake of ultra-processed food is associated with higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), finds a study published by The BMJ today. Ultra-processed foods include packaged baked goods and snacks, fizzy drinks, sugary cereals, ready meals containing food additives, and reconstituted meat and fish products - often containing high levels of added sugar, fat and salt, but lacking in vitamins and fibre. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is more common in industrialised nations and it is thought that dietary factors might play a role, but ...
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